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Ébène String Quartet Photo
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Ébène String Quartet

Thursday, May 2, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Announcement of the Winners of the 2019 Creative Reactions Contest at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN String Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1
GABRIEL FAURÉ String Quartet in E Minor, Op. 121
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 131

About the Artist

Perhaps we can all agree that the French are inherently cooler than the rest of us. After all, this is a people who invented black turtlenecks and Existentialism, while simultaneously perfecting the breakfast pastry. And at the top of the list of “cool things from France” is the Ébène Quartet, perhaps the only group in history that can smoothly transition from Bartók to barbershop harmonies, Brahms to Bruce Springsteen. Here, they’ll focus on Beethoven as part of their multi-year cycle of his complete string quartets, while also taking the time to perform their signature rendition of the Fauré quartet – the first time it’s ever been performed at PUC!

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FROM THE FOUR CORNERS...

Over the years, PUC has brought in ensembles from all around the world. In addition to the Ébène Quartet (France), we’ve hosted the debuts of the Hagen String Quartet (Germany), the Budapest String Quartet (Hungary), the Danish String Quartet (Denmark), the Tokyo String Quartet (Japan), the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir (one guess where they’re from…), and many more.

Artist Website

Ébène String Quartet »

Ébène Quartet plays Haydn

More videos at discover and listen »
Princeton University Orchestra & Glee Club, Gustavo Dudamel, Conductor Photo
Princeton University Orchestra & Glee Club, Gustavo Dudamel, Conductor Photo
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Princeton University Orchestra & Glee Club, Gustavo Dudamel, Conductor

Friday, April 26, 2019, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Gustavo Dudamel: Artist-In-Residence subscription package.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

FRANZ SCHUBERT Gesang der Geister über den Wassern for Men’s Chorus, D. 714
PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Romeo and Juliet
FELIX MENDELSSOHN A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Op. 61

About the Artist

For the final concert in the residency, Maestro Dudamel picks up his baton for the first time and does the thing he does better than anyone else in the world today: inspire and empower young people through the power of music. He will lead the Princeton University Orchestra and Glee Club in a program centered around two great Shakespeare plays, Tchaikovsky’s take on Romeo and Juliet and Mendelssohn’s majestic rendition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The latter will feature film projections by Venezuelan film director Alberto Arvelo, a good friend of Maestro Dudamel, with whom he has collaborated several times in the past.

“I cannot say that music is the only thing that will save the world, but we have to put art somewhere far more central to the main sense of our society.”

- Gustavo Dudamel
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Ensemble Berlin: featuring members of Berlin Philharmonic

Tuesday, April 23, 2019, 7:00 PM Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Gustavo Dudamel: Artist-In-Residence subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

CURATED BY GUSTAVO DUDAMEL

Exploring “Art & Nature”
Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel

STEVEN MACKEY New Work written for the occasion
RICHARD WAGNER Fantasia in F-sharp Minor, WWV 22
RICHARD WAGNER Prelude and Liebestod from “Tristan and Isolde”
FRANZ SCHUBERT “The Shepherd on The Rock” D. 965
FRANZ SCHUBERT Fantasy in C Major, D. 760  “Wanderer”

About the Artist

Maestro Dudamel’s relationship to the hallowed Berlin Philharmonic stretches back a decade and includes close personal connections with the orchestra’s most recent Music Directors, Claudio Abbado and Sir Simon Rattle. For this concert, Dudamel has chosen a handful of musicians from that august orchestra to perform a program that explores nature in all its forms – from science to the environment to the very nature of humanity itself. Works by Schubert and Wagner, as well as a new work by Princeton University faculty composer Steven Mackey, paint a broad musical portrait of the physical world and beyond that is perhaps most elegantly encompassed by a quotation from their contemporary, poet Heinrich Heine: “When words leave off, music begins.”

Artist Website

Ensemble Berlin »

“I cannot say that music is the only thing that will save the world, but we have to put art somewhere for more central to the main sense of our society.”

- Gustavo Dudamel
Avi Avital, Mandolin & Omer Avital, Bass Photo
Avi Avital, Mandolin & Omer Avital, Bass Photo
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Avi Avital, Mandolin & Omer Avital, Bass

Tuesday, April 16, 2019, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package, or you can subscribe to all 3 Crossroads Series concerts for $81.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

Avital Meets Avital

What do you get when you mix up Moroccan, North African, Israeli, and Mediterranean musical traditions and filter them through a blend of jazz and classical idioms? We probably would never have known if not for the musical union of mandolinist Avi Avital and bassist Omer Avital (no relation). Fortunately for us, these two virtuosos have joined forces to explore the crossroads of classical technique and jazz improvisation, in a conversation that grows from a shared cultural experience and travels across genres and decades to arrive in a place of mutual self-discovery.

Artist Websites

Avi Avitalk »
Omer Avital »

Avital Meets Avital: Maroc

More videos at discover and listen »

“Everything you never dreamt a mandolin could do…truly breathtaking in virtuosity and dedication.”

- Haaretz Daily
Australian Chamber Orchestra, Richard Tognetti, Artistic Director with Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
Australian Chamber Orchestra, Richard Tognetti, Artistic Director with Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
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Australian Chamber Orchestra, Richard Tognetti, Artistic Director with Paul Lewis, Piano

Thursday, April 11, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

SAMUEL ADAMS Concerto Grosso

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K. 467

JOHANNES BRAHMS String Sextet in G Major, Op. 36, arr. for String Orchestra

 

 

About the Artist

CHARLES S. ROBINSON MEMORIAL CONCERT

There’s something indescribable about watching the 18 players of the Australian Chamber Orchestra perform together – the way they move, stand, breathe, and play as one, led by the indefatigable Richard Tognetti. The visceral, explosive energy they generate as an ensemble pushes the boundaries of chamber music, and when combined with the intensity and vision of a pianist like Paul Lewis, you’re in for a truly transformative evening of music-making. They’ll be playing Mozart’s evergreen “Elvira Madigan” concerto, as well as an arrangement Brahms’ aching Sextet in G Major and a brand-new work by Samuel Adams (the composer, not the famed brewer/founding father).

Artist Websites

Australian Chamber Orchestra »
Paul Lewis »

Australian Chamber Orchestra plays Beethoven "Kreutzer" Sonata

More videos at discover and listen »

“The gang every string player wants to be in.”

- The Guardian
Takács String Quartet with Marc-André Hamelin, Piano and John Feeney, Bass Photo
Takács String Quartet with Marc-André Hamelin, Piano and John Feeney, Bass Photo
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Takács String Quartet with Marc-André Hamelin, Piano and John Feeney, Bass

Thursday, April 4, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. 1, Hob.III:75
DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH String Quartet No. 4 in D Major, Op. 83
FRANZ SCHUBERT Quintet for Piano and Stringsin A Major, D. 667 “Trout”

About the Artist

At this point, the Takács String Quartet are part of the PUC family, making their 20th appearance on the series this season. But this year will be different – not only because of their recently-announced new second violinist Harumi Rhodes (daughter of Samuel Rhodes of the Juilliard Quartet), but also because they’ll be bringing along the magnificent pianist Marc-André Hamelin to play the scales off of Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet. “Why the ‘Trout’?” you may ask. Well first, because it’s a shining jewel in the crown of the chamber music repertoire, but also because it came out on top of our audience survey of “favorite pieces of chamber music.” You asked for it, friends, and now you’ve got it!

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A TIMELESS CLASSIC...

Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet was first performed on the series in 1909 by the Kneisel String Quartet and friends, and has remained a PUC favorite for over a century as one of the most popular selections in our “favorite pieces of chamber music” audience survey.

Artist Websites

Takács String Quartet »
Marc-André Hamelin »

“This is chamber music of overwhelming intensity...simply the best I have ever heard in concert.”

- The Guardian
Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Violin and Polina Leschenko, Piano Photo
Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Violin and Polina Leschenko, Piano Photo
Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Violin and Polina Leschenko, Piano Photo
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Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Violin and Polina Leschenko, Piano

Thursday, March 28, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

BÉLA BARTÓK Violin Sonata No. 2
FRANCIS POULENC Violin Sonata
GEORGE ENESCU Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Op. 25
MAURICE RAVEL “Tzigane”

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AS FATE WOULD HAVE IT...

George Enescu may be a featured composer on this program, but he actually gave the PUC premiere of Ravel’s “Tzigane,” performing on the series as a violinist in 1938!

About the Artist

First things first: it’s pronounced “Koh-pah-CHEEN-skah-yah,” but you can feel free to just call her “PatKop.” This wild-child of the violin has exploded onto the international scene in recent years with an untamable energy and a far-reaching approach to repertoire that runs from baroque and classical to commissions and reimagined modern masterpieces. For her PUC debut, she explores music rooted in her Moldovan-Austrian-Swiss heritage, from Enescu’s folksy Sonata No. 3 to the Hungarian flavors of Ravel’s “Tzigane.”

Artist Website

Patricia Kopatchinkskaja »

Kopatchinskaja talks about the duo recording between herself and Leschenko

More videos at discover and listen »

“The duo offers a feast of edgy, risk-filled music-making”

- The Guardian
Meet The Music Photo
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Meet The Music

Saturday, March 23, 2019, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

“The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses”
with special guests
The Princeton Girlchoir

For Kids Ages 6-12

About the Artist

Based on the beloved story by Paul Goble, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses is a musical telling of the exciting and haunting tale of a Native American girl who understands horses on a mystical level and runs away from home to be with the horses. A story of thunderstorms and thundering hooves, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses will enchant and inspire audiences of all ages. Music by Bruce Adolphe.

Artist Websites

Meet The Music »
Bruce Adolphe »
Alexander Melnikov, Piano and Andreas Staier, Piano Photo
Alexander Melnikov, Piano and Andreas Staier, Piano Photo
Alexander Melnikov, Piano and Andreas Staier, Piano Photo
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Alexander Melnikov, Piano and Andreas Staier, Piano

Thursday, March 14, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

PADEREWSKI MEMORIAL CONCERT

SCHUBERT WORKS FOR PIANO DUO
including the Fantasie in F Minor, D. 940

About the Artist

Back in 2016, Alexander Melnikov came to PUC and played a 3-hour program of the complete preludes and fugues of Shostakovich that left the audience with jaws squarely on the floor (his recording of the works was named one of the “50 Greatest Recordings of All Time” by BBC Music Magazine). Now he returns with good friend and fellow keyboard maven Andreas Staier to perform a gloriously intimate program of Schubert’s four-hand piano music. It’s the concert equivalent of gourmet-quality comfort food, and you’ll want to be there, plate in hand.

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SPEAKING OF PIANO PAIRS...

Famed husband-and-wife duo Robert and Gaby Casadesus lived in Princeton, where they performed at PUC and developed a lasting friendship  with violinist (and occasional physicist) Albert Einstein.

Artist Websites

Alexander Melnikov »
Andreas Staier »

Alexander Melnikov on the piano

More videos at discover and listen »
Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano Photo
Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano Photo
Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano Photo
Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano Photo
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Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano

Sunday, March 10, 2019, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

"SONGPLAY"
with special guests
CRAIG TERRY, Piano
CHUCK ISRAELS, Bass
CHARLIE PORTER, Trumpet
JIMMY MADISON, Drums

About the Artist

Joyce DiDonato is one of the great communicators of our era – able to bridge genres and generations with her profound humanity, her musical vision, and her extraordinary voice. In her new program, “SONGPLAY,” she traces the musical thread from the Italian Baroque to the American Songbook, including art songs to sambas to jazz ballads. PUC audiences got a taste of this back in 2015 when she sang the Italian art song standard “Caro mio ben” with a jazz piano accompaniment as an encore to a jaw-dropping recital debut. She and her ensemble play with the transitions and connections between styles and centuries, weaving a musical tapestry connected by a collective sense of joy and experimentation.

Artist Website

Joyce DiDonato »

Joyce DiDonato Interview

More videos at discover and listen »

“Joyce sings and the world is suddenly brighter.”

- American composer Jake Heggie
Steven Isserlis, Cello and Connie Shih, Piano Photo
Steven Isserlis, Cello and Connie Shih, Piano Photo
Steven Isserlis, Cello and Connie Shih, Piano Photo
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Steven Isserlis, Cello and Connie Shih, Piano

Thursday, February 28, 2019, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

"Composers & their Muses"

CLARA SCHUMANN 3 Romances, Op. 22, arr. Isserlis
ROBERT SCHUMANN 3 Romances, Op. 94

VÍTEZSLAVA KAPRÁLOVÁ Ritornelle

BOHUSLAV MARTINU Sonata No. 1 for Cello and Piano
AUGUSTA HOLMÈS “Minstrel’s Chant,” arr. Isserlis
CÉSAR FRANCK Sonata for Cello and Piano in A Major

About the Artist

Steven Isserlis is – without question – one of the greatest cellists performing today. One of only two living cellists in the Gramophone Hall of Fame (the other one is a little-known performer named Yo-Yo Ma), this is a man who never stops searching, reaching, and expanding his musical output. PUC is honored to have him make his long-awaited debut on the series, with a program that tells a tale of love and influence, juxtaposing works by female composers with those of the men they inspired. Join us for what promises to be a luminous night of music making and storytelling, with one of the leading lights of the art form.

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IT'S A CELLOBRATION!

Isserlis is the latest in a distinguished line of cellists to bring their resonant tones to Richardson Auditorium. Previous performers include greats like Pablo Casals (1922), Jacqueline du Pré (1968), Mstislav Rostropovich (1963), and Yo-Yo Ma (1979).

Artist Websites

Steven Isserlis »
Connie Shih »

Steven Isserlis and Connie Shih

More videos at discover and listen »

“He can have the listener in perpetual wonder at the ingredients of his art.”

- The Australian
Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings in F Major, D. 803 Photo
Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings in F Major, D. 803 Photo
Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings in F Major, D. 803 Photo
Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings in F Major, D. 803 Photo
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Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings in F Major, D. 803

Tuesday, February 19, 2019, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM On Stage at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Concerts on the Performances Up Close series are offered only as single tickets; however, in honor of our 125th anniversary, subscribers to the Anniversary Series can buy a ticket to this concert with your subscription now.

Program

Brentano String Quartet
Anthony McGill, Clarinet
Jennifer Montone, Horn
Daniel Matsukawa, Bassoon
Leigh Mesh, Bass

Listening to Franz Schubert’s Octet makes one feel that a reservoir of melody has been opened up, with torrents of tunefulness pouring from each measure. What might on the surface seem like a light-hearted musical diversion, in fact, holds deep wells of yearning, evanescent beauty, haunting the lighter moments and looking toward the composer’s far darker works. The sound world expands and contracts, sounding richly symphonic one moment and strikingly spare the next, and in the hands of the Brentano Quartet – who spent 16 years in-residence at Princeton – and friends, this kaleidoscopic masterpiece will be nothing short of revelatory.

Artist Website

Brentano String Quartet »

Schubert Octet for Winds & Strings

More videos at discover and listen »
Gabriel Kahane, Vocalist/Composer Photo
Gabriel Kahane, Vocalist/Composer Photo
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Gabriel Kahane, Vocalist/Composer

Thursday, February 14, 2019, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package, or you can subscribe to all 3 Crossroads Series concerts for $81.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

8980: Book of Travelers

In these divided times, music has an ever-more important role as a universal language of connection, and a reminder of our shared experience. The morning after the 2016 presidential election, singer-songwriter Gabriel Kahane packed a suitcase and took a two-week, 8,980-mile train trip across the U.S. without a phone or internet. The resulting song cycle, drawn from the kaleidoscopic spectrum of his fellow travelers, is an eloquent cry for reconciliation and an attempt to rediscover our collective humanity in the face of all that seeks to separate us.

Artist Websites

Gabriel Kahane »
Book of Travelers »

Gabriel Kahane's 8980:Book of Travelers

More videos at discover and listen »

“The most remarkable thing he achieves, in song after song, might just be his vivid yet subtle articulation of empathy.”

- The New York Times
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Richardson Chamber Players: Then & Now

Sunday, February 10, 2019, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

“Then & Now: Celebrating PUC’s 125th Anniversary,”  featuring mixed chamber works by Camille Saint-Saëns, Johannes Brahms, Eric Nathan, Richard Strauss, and Anton Arensky written during PUC’s inaugural season (1894–1895) paired with works of today

About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students offer Sunday afternoon concerts of mixed chamber works.

Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time Photo
Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time Photo
Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time Photo
Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time Photo
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Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time

Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM On Stage at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Concerts on the Performances Up Close series are offered only as single tickets; however, in honor of our 125th anniversary, subscribers to the Anniversary Series can buy a ticket to this concert with your subscription now.

Program

STEFAN JACKIW, Violin
JAY CAMPBELL, Cello
YOONAH KIM, Clarinet
CONRAD TAO, Piano

No words can adequately capture the towering mystery of Olivier Messiaen’s “Quartet for the End of Time.” One can speak of the piece’s backstory, composed in a World War II concentration camp and inspired by the biblical depiction of an Angel of God heralding the end of days. One can describe the musical language, which incorporates birdsong, plainchant, shimmering cascades of light, a sonic depiction of eternity, and everything in between. But ultimately, the only way to truly understand it is to sit in wonder as this hour-long musical journey reveals the depths of our humanity while simultaneously opening the door to the infinite. Guiding our way will be four of the brightest young stars of classical music, led by PUC favorite Stefan Jackiw, who stepped in for Isabelle Faust back in 2015 and illuminated a darkened hall (and our collective souls) with a movement of the Messiaen arranged for violin and piano. A number of concertgoers expressed the hope that they might one day hear him play the full piece, and now, friends, that day has come.

Artist Websites

Stefan Jackiw »
Conrad Tao »

“Talent that's off the scale”

- Washington Post on Stefan Jackiw
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Musicians from the Los Angeles Philharmonic

Monday, January 7, 2019, 7:00 PM Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Gustavo Dudamel: Artist-In-Residence subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

CURATED BY GUSTAVO DUDAMEL

Exploring “Art & Faith”
Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel

JURI SEO New Work written for the occasion
WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART Quintet in A Major for Clarinet and Strings, K. 581
ARVO PÄRT Chamber Works

About the Artist

Conductor Sir Georg Solti once said “Mozart makes you believe in God,” and it’s hard to disagree after listening to the absolute perfection of his Clarinet Quintet. As the luminous centerpiece of this program that explores the intersection of art and spirituality, Mozart’s music will be placed side-by-side with that of living Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, whose “holy minimalist” works evoke a kind of meditative transcendence, containing oceans of feeling in their seemingly simple repetitions. A new work by Princeton University faculty composer Juri Seo rounds out this intense, introspective program.

Artist Website

Los Angeles Philharmonic »

“I cannot say that music is the only thing that will save the world, but we have to put art somewhere far more central to the main sense of our society.”

- Gustavo Dudamel
Martin Fröst, Clarinet and Henrik Mawe, Piano Photo
Martin Fröst, Clarinet and Henrik Mawe, Piano Photo
Martin Fröst, Clarinet and Henrik Mawe, Piano Photo
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Martin Fröst, Clarinet and Henrik Mawe, Piano

Thursday, December 13, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

FRANCIS POULENC Sonata for Clarinet and Piano

ANTONIO VIVALDI / GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN Selections for Clarinet and Piano
JOHANNES BRAHMS Sonata No. 2 for Clarinet and Piano in E-flat Major, Op. 120, No. 2
JOHANNES BRAHMS Hungarian Dances, arr. by Fröst

About the Artist

When asked “What’s your favorite instrument to hear in a classical music recital?” most people’s default response probably wouldn’t be “the clarinet.” That is, until they’ve heard the sweeping sounds of Swedish clarinetist Martin Fröst. This is a performer who truly transcends his instrument and makes music that simply feels alive. From his riveting on-stage presence (he’s been known to dress up like a bird in concert) to his inventive approach to programming, if anyone is going to convert you to the clarinet, it’s Fröst. For his PUC debut (and one of only two U.S. recitals this season), he’s joined by fellow Swede Henrik Måwe for a sumptuous spread of Brahms, Poulenc, and Vivaldi/Telemann arrangements.

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SPEAKING OF THE CLARINET...

PUC has a long history of presenting non-traditional instruments in recital, including banjos, mandolins, bagpipes, accordions, harpsichords, crumhorns, and even an Anglo-Saxon harp!

Artist Websites

Martin Frost »
Henrik Mawe »

Clarinetist Martin Fröst plays Poulenc Sonata

More videos at discover and listen »

“Until you've heard Martin Fröst, you really haven't heard the clarinet”

- The Times (London)
Simón Bolívar String Quartet Photo
Simón Bolívar String Quartet Photo
Simón Bolívar String Quartet Photo
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Simón Bolívar String Quartet

Sunday, December 2, 2018, 2:00 PM Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Gustavo Dudamel: Artist-In-Residence subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

CURATED BY GUSTAVO DUDAMEL

Exploring “Art & the Americas”
Panel discussion following the concert, moderated by Gustavo Dudamel

ALBERTO GINASTERA String Quartet No. 1, Op. 20
DONNACHA DENNEHY New Work written for the occasion
ANTONÍN DVORÁK String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96  “American”

About the Artist

As Music Director of the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, Dudamel will bring together a string quartet made of the principals in the orchestra (each now living outside of his home country), to play a program that explores music’s ability to transcend geographical and political borders and unite us in our shared experiences. A highlight of the program will be a new work by Princeton University faculty composer Donnacha Dennehy.

Artist Website

Simón Bolívar String Quartet »

Simón Bolivar String Quartet plays Shostakovich

More videos at discover and listen »

“I cannot say that music is the only thing that will save the world, but we have to put art somewhere far more central to the main sense of our society.”

- Gustavo Dudamel
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Richardson Chamber Players: From Rio to Brooklyn

Sunday, November 11, 2018, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

“From Rio to Brooklyn,” featuring mixed chamber works of George Gershwin, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Silvestre Revueltas, Astor Piazzolla, and Cuban composer Leo Brouwer

 

About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students offer Sunday afternoon concerts of mixed chamber works.

Abigail Washburn, Banjo & Wu Fei, Guzheng Photo
Abigail Washburn, Banjo & Wu Fei, Guzheng Photo
Abigail Washburn, Banjo & Wu Fei, Guzheng Photo
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Abigail Washburn, Banjo & Wu Fei, Guzheng

Thursday, November 8, 2018, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package, or you can subscribe to all 3 Crossroads Series concerts for $81.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

Beijing Meets Banjo

It might feel a bit strange to use the words “rockstar” and “guzheng” in the same sentence, but if anyone can take this 2,000-year-old Chinese stringed instrument and crank it up to 11, it would be Wu Fei. She is single-handedly responsible for bringing this once-elitist court instrument out of the palaces of the Qin dynasty and into the streets, using it in entirely unexpected and captivating ways. And matching her string for string and note for note is Abigail Washburn, a banjo virtuoso (and wife of fellow picker Béla Fleck) and TED Fellow who happens to also be fluent in both the language and culture of China. Together, these two remarkable musicians come together for an evening of musical storytelling that crosses continents to find commonalities.

Artist Websites

Abigail Wiashburn »
Wu Fei »

Boat Song/The Water is Wide." The two songs are folk songs from China and the U.S.

More videos at discover and listen »

“This sparkling collaboration...brought the similarities between Appalachian and Chinese folk tunes into stark relief, playing pan-continental mashups of traditional music. American folk tunes were gently decorated with the zither's glissando, and a take on the Coon Creek Girls' 1938 78 rpm record "Banjo Pickin' Girl" featured a furious zither solo. ”

- Rolling Stone Magazine
Baby Got Bach: Bring on the Brass! Photo
Baby Got Bach: Bring on the Brass! Photo
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Baby Got Bach: Bring on the Brass!

Saturday, November 3, 2018, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

“Bring on the Brass!”
with special guests
The Westerlies Brass Quartet

 

About the Artist

Back by popular demand, pianist and host Orli Shaham will introduce pre-school-aged kids to the joy of live classical music.  She will be joined by special guest artists, the Westerlies Brass Quartet. The Westerlies navigate a wide array of music with the precision of a string quartet, the audacity of a rock band, and the charm of a family sing-along.

Artist Websites

The Westerlies »
Orli Shaham »

“Baby Got Bach is a Must-See”

- New York Family Magazine
Schubert String Quintet in C Major, D. 956 Photo
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Schubert String Quintet in C Major, D. 956

Wednesday, October 17, 2018, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM On Stage at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Concerts on the Performances Up Close series are offered only as single tickets; however, in honor of our 125th anniversary, subscribers to the Anniversary Series can buy a ticket to this concert with your subscription now.

Program

TAKÁCS STRING QUARTET
with DAVID REQUIRO, Cello

Yehudi Menuhin might have put it best when he described Franz Schubert’s music as “purity itself.” His sublime cello quintet, completed weeks before his death, is quite possibly one of the most perfectly written works in all of chamber music - a piece of astounding beauty that exists entirely in its own musical universe. Centered around a miraculous slow movement that seems to stop time itself, the narrative fuses drama, consoling sadness, transcendence, bliss, and more, before ending with a rousing dance-like finale which – composed as the composer lay on his death bed – stands among the most life-affirming statements in all of music.

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

Takács String Quartet with Marc Coppey play Schubert Quintet

More videos at discover and listen »
Jerusalem String Quartet with special guests Pinchas Zukerman, Viola and Amanda Forsyth, Cello Photo
Jerusalem String Quartet with special guests Pinchas Zukerman, Viola and Amanda Forsyth, Cello Photo
Jerusalem String Quartet with special guests Pinchas Zukerman, Viola and Amanda Forsyth, Cello Photo
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Jerusalem String Quartet with special guests Pinchas Zukerman, Viola and Amanda Forsyth, Cello

Thursday, October 11, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert is currently on sale as part of the 125th Anniversary Series subscription package and the Concert Classics Series subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018. 

Program

RICHARD STRAUSS String Sextet Op. 85 from Capriccio
ARNOLD SCHOENBERG String Sextet Op. 4, “Verklärte Nacht”
PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY String Sextet Op. 70, “Souvenir de Florence”

About the Artist

All of the best things in life begin with friends and family, and our 125th season is no exception. We’ll kick things off by bringing back the acclaimed Jerusalem String Quartet after a six-year hiatus – but they won’t be coming alone. They’ll be bringing their longtime friend and mentor, legendary violist Pinchas Zukerman, and his wife, cellist Amanda Forsyth. Together, these old acquaintances will offer a program of rarely heard, richly expressive works. The season will saunter out of the gate to the aristocratic overtones of Strauss’ faux-Rococo sextet from his opera Capriccio, before shifting the mood to Schoenberg’s transfixing, transcendent “Transfigured Night.” The concert will end on a bittersweet note with Tchaikovsky’s touchingly nostalgic “Souvenir de Florence.”

Artist Websites

Jerusalem Quartet »
Pinchas Zukerman »

Jeruasalem String Quartet plays Shostakovich

More videos at discover and listen »

“An absolute triumph! Their playing has everything you could possibly wish for.”

- BBC Music Magazine
Bobby McFerrin, Vocalist Photo
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Bobby McFerrin, Vocalist

Friday, September 21, 2018, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This event is currently being sold as an add-on to a subscription package.  It can also be added to a Make Your Own Series subscription.  Single tickets to this event will go on sale online only on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, and everywhere else on Tuesday, September 4, 2018.

Program

"CIRCLESONGS"

About the Artist

Bobby McFerrin is not so much a musician as he is an instrument of music itself, a pure distillation of sound into joy whose performances blur the lines between performer and audience, fusing the two in a joyous communion. He opens PUC’s 125th season in that same spirit of community with his remarkable Circlesongs, a unique musical language that grows out of tribal chant and sacred music, moving across styles and time periods and resulting in something that is as ancient as it is urgently relevant. McFerrin will improvise an evening of shared sound with some help from the Princeton University Glee Club, and together they’ll lead the audience in a call and response, following a pulsing pathway toward the freedom we feel when raising our voices together in harmony.

Artist Website

Bobby McFerrin »

“He has the uncanny ability to bring out your inner child.”

- The New York Times
Truls Mørk, Cello and Behzod Abduraimov, Piano Photo
Truls Mørk, Cello and Behzod Abduraimov, Piano Photo
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Truls Mørk, Cello and Behzod Abduraimov, Piano

Thursday, May 3, 2018, 8:00 PM Creative Reactions Contest Winners Announcement at 7pm, free to ticketholders

Ticket Info

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Program

RACHMANINOFF Two Pieces for Cello and Piano, Op. 2
GRIEG Cello Sonata in A Minor, Op. 36
GRIEG Intermezzo in A Minor for Cello and Piano
RACHMANINOFF Cello Sonata in G Minor, Op. 19

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Truls Mørk is one of the 21st century’s definitive cellists—his tone is song-like and recognizable, as if he’s extracting his own voice from the instrument. He is the only Norwegian ever to win a Grammy Award, and his playing has been characterized as “unforced splendor … his expansive, Russian-inflected bowing and vibrato ensures that quiet passages float into the far reaches of the hall.” (The New Yorker) In the last decade, his public appearances have been scarce due to illness, and we feel honored to be a part of his return to the world stage, which has already been met with glorious reviews. He is joined by Uzbek pianist Behzod Abduraimov in a program of chamber music by two great composers from their respective homelands: Norway’s Edvard Grieg and Russia’s Sergei Rachmaninoff. Abduraimov made his Princeton debut in 2013 as a relatively unknown gem, and has since gone on to major stardom, including his Stern Auditorium in Carnegie Hall debut this past season.

Artist Websites

Truls Mørk »
Behzod Abduraimov »

Truls Mork Plays Chopin Sonata

More videos at discover and listen »

Cellist Truls Mork Plays Rachmaninoff Cello Sonata - 2nd movt.

More audio at discover and listen »

“Technical control is one thing, but the compelling quality throughout this programme was the intense personal conviction Truls conveyed … By turns tender, introverted, fiery and passionate, he constantly propelled us forward on this compelling epic journey.”

- The Strad Magazine
Voices of America: Celebrating African-American Composers Photo
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Voices of America: Celebrating African-American Composers

Sunday, April 15, 2018, 3:00 PM

Ticket Info

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Program

"Voices of America: Celebrating African-American Composers"

GEORGE WALKER Bleu for unaccompanied violin
ALVIN SINGLETON Sweet Chariot
DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN  Fast Black Dance Machine
BILLY STRAYHORN/DUKE ELLINGTON  "Take the 'A' Train"
DUKE ELLINGTON   "Come Sunday" from Black, Brown and Beige
DUKE ELLINGTON "It Don't Mean a Thing (If it Ain't Got That Swing)"
KENDALL WILLIAMS  Taking a Chance (World Premiere)

PLAYERS:

Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute
Aawa White, Flute
Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet
Robert Wagner, Bassoon
Oliver Santana-Rivera, Saxophone
Vincent Ector, Drums
Adda Kridler, Violin
Alberto Parrini, Cello
Brian Glassman, Bass
Peggy Kampmeier, piano
John Nydam '20, piano

 

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was formed in the 1994-1995 Centennial Season of Princeton University Concerts. The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Their repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This season’s programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of pianist Geoffrey Burleson, trombonist Benjamin Herrington, and soprano Sarah Pelletier. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Lawrence Brownlee, Tenor & Justina Lee, Piano Photo
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Lawrence Brownlee, Tenor & Justina Lee, Piano

Thursday, April 12, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

SCHUMANN Dichterliebe, Op. 48

plus
Traditional Spirituals

Every Time I Feel the Spirit
Sinner Please Don’t Let This Harvest Pass
Soon I Will Be Done
Here’s One
There Is a Balm in Gilead
Deep River
Come by Here Good Lord

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Richardson Auditorium will transform into the Metropolitan Opera stage for an evening as the superstar tenor Lawrence Brownlee visits for a wonderfully imaginative program of songs. Brownlee has been called “one of the world’s leading bel canto tenors” (Associated Press) and his voice “an instrument of great beauty and expression” (NPR), and over the last five years he has taken the opera world by storm, performing at nearly every major opera house and alongside dozens of world-class orchestras. Recently, he has turned his attention to the urgent and painfully relevant topic of race relations in America, releasing a CD of spirituals and other songs that engage with his African-American roots, in tribute to Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and the Black Lives Matter movement. His program here at Princeton will be half spirituals and half art song, delivered in his one-of-a-kind, glistening belt.

BEYOND THE MUSIC...
Take your love of music, and this artist, even further with our Beyond the Music Programming.  Tenor Lawrence Brownlee will be participating in a special event beyond the concert.

Performers As Teachers - Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:00AM, Lee Rehearsal Room in the Lewis Arts complex. Lawrence Brownlee coaches Princeton student vocalists. Free and Open to the Public. MORE INFO ON ALL PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS EVENTS>

Artist Website

Lawrence Brownlee »

Lawrence Brownlee Sings There's A Balm in Gilead

More videos at discover and listen »

Lawrence Brownlee Everytime I feel the Spirit

More audio at discover and listen »

“With his sweet tone, fastidious pitch, and poetic phrasing, Brownlee made familiar fare sound intriguingly fresh, banishing, for a moment, the ghosts of Caruso and Pavarotti.”

- Alex Ross, The New Yorker
Artemis String Quartet Photo
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Artemis String Quartet

Thursday, April 5, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

MOZART String Quartet No. 23 in F Major, K. 590
SHOSTAKOVICH String Quartet No. 7 in F-sharp Minor, Op. 108
SCHUMANN String Quartet in A Major, Op. 41, No. 3

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Since their formation in Lübeck, Germany in 1989, the Artemis Quartet has steadily risen to the top tier of European chamber music, hosting regular series in Vienna, Berlin, and Amsterdam that have achieved legendary status. Passion, power, and harnessed-chaos are the hallmarks of their style. The New York Times described a recent concert at Carnegie Hall as “a warm, alert performance, shivering with energy even in its silences.” They return to Princeton after a tremendous 2013 performance, bringing with them a new second violinist and a varied program of masterworks. Mozart’s K. 590 String Quartet, his last, is weightless and shimmering. Schumann’s Quartet Op. 41, No. 3, also his last, opens with a two-note downward-falling motif tenderly set to the lyric “Clara,” his wife. In between is Shostakovich’s hugely popular String Quartet No. 7, which clocks in at a slim thirteen minutes and is equal parts sardonic and heartbreakingly sincere.

Artist Website

Artemis String Quartet »

Artemis Quartet Plays Schumann

More videos at discover and listen »

“… they leap, in a single bow stroke, from a snarl to a smile.”

Sir András Schiff, Piano Photo
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Sir András Schiff, Piano

Thursday, March 29, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert announcement of the 18-19 season at 7:15pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

MENDELSSOHN Fantasie in F-sharp Minor, Op. 28
BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp Major, Op. 78
BRAHMS 8 Klavierstücke, Op. 76
BRAHMS 7 Fantasien, Op. 116
BACH English Suite No. 6 in D Minor, BWV 811

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Paderewski Memorial Concert

The New York Times writes, “There is nothing more reliable in the world of classical music today than pianist András Schiff playing Bach.” Over a four-decade career, Schiff has attained legendary status as one of the instrument’s all-time greats, amassing Grammys, Gramophones, and even Knighthood for his contribution to the arts. His interpretations of Bach’s keyboard music are perhaps the most influential since Glenn Gould, publicly denouncing use of the sustain pedal in favor of lean, clear counterpoint. But his approach and sound vary widely from composer to composer, era to era—he is one of a few living pianists whose musicianship genuinely seems to know no bounds, and the influence of his work on other artists can be heard in concert halls, universities, and recording studios around the world. He visits Richardson Auditorium with a program that is sure to shed new light on timeless classics.

Artist Website

András Schiff »

Sir András Schiff plays Bach

More videos at discover and listen »

“He’s a very rare example of a musician who sets moral standards for the world.”

- Conductor Iván Fischer
Baby Got Bach: String ‘Stravaganza Photo
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Baby Got Bach: String ‘Stravaganza

Saturday, March 17, 2018, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

Back by popular demand, pianist and host Orli Shaham will introduce pre-school-aged kids to the joy of live classical music. She will be joined by special guest artists the Rolston String Quartet, First Prize winners of the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition in 2016, in a program that highlights chamber music for string instruments with piano. Recommended for ages 3-6.

Read more about the program »

Artist Websites

Orli Shaham »
Rolston String Quartet »

Rolston Quartet plays Mendelssohn

More videos at discover and listen »
Tenebrae Choir, Nigel Short Artistic Director Photo
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Tenebrae Choir, Nigel Short Artistic Director

Thursday, March 15, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor John Fleming and Reverend Joan Fleming at 7pm, free to ticketholders. Talk will take place in Hamilton Murray Theater Princeton University Chapel

Ticket Info

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Program

OWAIN PARK Footsteps
JOBY TALBOT Path of Miracles

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

London’s 17-voice Tenebrae Choir, founded and directed by former King’s Singer Nigel Short, is one of the world’s leading vocal ensembles. With a repertoire that spans five centuries and especially celebrates new works, Tenebrae adheres to its self-described mission of “passion and precision.” They graced our series in 2012 and return this year with a very special performance of Joby Talbot’s Path of Miracles, commissioned by the group in 2005. The work is based on the most enduring route of the Catholic pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, and the drama unfolds both musically and visually, with the choir singing from all corners of the chapel. The Times (London) called Tenebrae’s recording of Path of Miracles “an evocative odyssey”—we invite you to take part in the odyssey with eyes and ears. The program begins with a wonderful new piece by British choral composer and rising star Owain Park. The piece was also commissioned by Tenebrae as a companion to Path of Miracles, and is scored for two choirs. Princeton’s own Glee Club will join Tenebrae in this memorable, homespun collaboration.

Note: this concert will be performed without intermission. Please allow plenty of time to park and find your seats.

WAIT!  THERE'S MORE!  WANT TO SING WITH THE MEMBERS OF TENEBRAE?  PARTICIPATE IN OUR LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM...
All amateur singers of any age, any level, are invited to join Tenebrae following the concert (roughly 9:45pm) for a community reading.  LEARN MORE HERE>

Artist Websites

Tenebrae »
Joby Talbot »

Tenebrae Records Owain Park's Footsteps

More videos at discover and listen »

“For purity and precision of tone, and flawless intonation, Nigel Short’s chamber choir Tenebrae is pretty much unbeatable.”

- The Times (London)
Bernstein & Friends: A Centennial Celebration Photo
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Bernstein & Friends: A Centennial Celebration

Sunday, March 11, 2018, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

"Bernstein and Friends: A Centennial Celebration"

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 7 Anniversaries for Piano
AARON COPLAND Fanfare for the Common Man
BERNSTEIN Aria "What a Movie" from Trouble in Tahiti
LUKAS FOSS For Lenny for Solo Piano
BERNSTEIN "Some Other Time" from On the Town
BERNSTEIN Two Love Songs for Mezzo-soprano and Piano
BERNSTEIN West Side Story Suite for Brass Quintet, arr. Jake Gale
WILLIAM SCHUMAN Brass Quintet

PLAYERS:

Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet
Nivanthi Karunaratne '18, Horn
Peter Delong '18, Horn
Allison Halter '18, Horn
Jacob Williams '20, Horn
Lucas Makinen '20, Trumpet
Christian Venturella '21, Trumpet
Benjamin Herrington, Trombone
Rajeev Erramilli '18, Trombone
Jeffrey Caswell, Bass Trombone
Mitch Hamburger '18, Tuba
John Ferrari, Percussion
Henry Peters '20, Percussion
Barbara Rearick, Mezzo-Soprano
Jennifer Tao, Piano

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was formed in the 1994-1995 Centennial Season of Princeton University Concerts. The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Their repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This season’s programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of pianist Geoffrey Burleson, trombonist Benjamin Herrington, and soprano Sarah Pelletier. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Danish String Quartet Photo
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Danish String Quartet

Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 6:00 PM & 9:00PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

“Modern Day Vikings”

6PM - Music of Jörg Widmann, Brahms
9PM - Scandinavian Folk Music

Make a night of It and come to both concerts with a Dancebreak in between....

NEW THIS YEAR: DANCEBREAK!
Immerse yourself in the folk tradition at the heart of this year’s PUC125 series through dance classes offered in between three of the PUC125 events. This class will be tailored to Scandinavian folk music performed at the concerts by the Danish String Quartet, and led by Scandinavian dance teacher Cathie Springer, with live music by fiddler Paul Morrissett from The Klezmatics. Embrace the folk spirit in these events, free to all ticketholders. This Dancebreak will take place in the Assembly Room at Nassau Presbyterian Church.

PLEASE NOTE:  You must have purchased tickets to one of the concerts in order to attend Dancebreak.  Tickets will be checked at the door.

About the Artist

A series that blends folk and classical traditions wouldn’t be complete without the tremendous Danish String Quartet. They visited Richardson in 2014 and blew us away with their unorthodox, laid-back approach to standard repertoire and Scandinavian folk music alike. Now, we get the opportunity to join them onstage for two PUC125 performances, much like the evening with Barokksolistene—classical music at 6pm, and arrangements of Scandinavian folk tunes at 9pm.

Artist Website

Danish String Quartet »

Danish String Quartet plays on NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts: Scandinavian Folk Music

More videos at discover and listen »

Danish Quartet Plays Scandinavian Folk Music

More audio at discover and listen »

“One of the best quartets before the public today.”

- Washington Post
Brentano String Quartet with special guest Jonathan Biss, Piano Photo
Brentano String Quartet with special guest Jonathan Biss, Piano Photo
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Brentano String Quartet with special guest Jonathan Biss, Piano

Thursday, February 15, 2018, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

MOZART String Quartet No. 19 in C Major, K. 465 “Dissonance”
WEBERN 6 Bagatellen for String Quartet, Op. 9 / SCHUBERT Minuets, D. 89
ELGAR Piano Quintet in A Minor, Op. 84

 

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Charles S. Robinson Memorial Concert

For thirteen years, the Brentano String Quartet was Princeton’s cherished quartet-in-residence, filling Richardson Auditorium with more wonderful performances than we can count, with a whirl of collaborators and repertoire. In 2014, they moved on to the same post at the Yale School of Music, replacing the Tokyo String Quartet after their 37-year tenure. The Daily Telegraph (London) has called their sound “hair-raising … An ensemble of exceptional insight and communicative gifts.” These gifts will be in full bloom in February, when the home team returns and is joined by another Princeton veteran, pianist Jonathan Biss. Biss is a New York City cultural linchpin with a long history as both a soloist and chamber musician. Their program includes the lush and rarely heard Elgar Piano Quintet, composed on vacation in summer of 1918 and “influenced by the quiet and peaceful surroundings.”

Artist Websites

Brentano String Quartet »
Jonathan Biss »

Excerpts from Brentano Quartet and Jonathan Biss playing Elgar and more

More videos at discover and listen »

“Biss’s ability and interest go for things of transcendence and sublimeness.”

- Pianist Leon Fleisher
Jennifer Koh, Violin Photo
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Jennifer Koh, Violin

Thursday, February 8, 2018, 6:00 PM & 9:00PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

“Exploring Bach’s Chaconne and Its Legacy” – through works by Missy Mazzoli, and Luciano Berio

NEW THIS YEAR: DANCEBREAK!
Immerse yourself in the folk tradition at the heart of this year’s PUC125 series through dance classes offered in between three of the PUC125 events. This Baroque Dance class will be centered around the Chaconne step and taught by professional dancer Carlos Fittante.  Dancebreak is free to all ticketholders. and will take place in the Assembly Room at Nassau Presbyterian Church, right across the parking lot from Richardson Auditorium.  Please use the entrance on the parking lot side of the church. For dancing, we recommend that you wear comfortable clothes. The class will last one hour, and will be finished by 8:30pm in order to allow the 9:00pm ticketholders enough time to make the concert.

PLEASE NOTE:  You must have purchased tickets to one of the concerts in order to attend Dancebreak.  Tickets will be checked at the door.

About the Artist

Although J.S. Bach is not typically categorized as “folk music,” much of his work found origins in the rhythms and tunes of dance. Trailblazing violinist Jennifer Koh explores these connections in a program based on one of Bach’s greatest dances, the Chaconne from his Violin Partita in D Minor. She will perform this pillar of classical music, followed by contemporary music that explicitly looks to it for inspiration.

BEYOND THE MUSIC...
Take your love of music, and this artist, even further with our Beyond the Music Programming.  Violinist Jennifer Koh will be participating in two special events beyond the concert.

Live Music Meditation - Wednesday, February 7, 2018 at 12:30PM, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Free and Open to the Public. No prior experience necessary.  MORE INFO ON ALL MINDFULNESS WITH MUSIC EVENTS>

Performers As Teachers - Wednesday, February 7, 2018 at 7:00PM, Taplin Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Jennifer Koh coaches Princeton student violinists. Free and Open to the Public. MORE INFO ON ALL PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS EVENTS>

Artist Website

Jennifer Koh »

Jennifer Koh Plays Bach Chaconne at the 92Y in New York City

More videos at discover and listen »

Jennifer Koh plays Adagio from Bach Solo Violin Sonata No. 1

More audio at discover and listen »

“A seeker, an adventurer, an artist who endeavors to find and reveal relationships, and to see the Western musical heritage in an evolving, unbroken continuum.”

- Financial Times (London)
Bohemia: Echoes of Vltava Photo
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Bohemia: Echoes of Vltava

Sunday, November 19, 2017, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

"Bohemia: Echoes of Vltava"
A musical journey down the Vltava river through works by Czech composers.

JOSEF SUK from Life and Dreams for Solo Piano, Op. 30
BEDRICH SMETANA Five Evening Songs for Soprano and Piano, T. 124
LEOS JANACEK String Quartet No. 1
ANTONIN DVORAK Quintet No. 2 for Piano and Strings. Op. 81

PLAYERS:

Eric Wyrick, Violin
Tabitha Oh '18, Violin
Kristin Qian '18, Violin
Jessica Thompson, Viola
Tom Kraines, Cello
Francine Kay, Piano
Sarah Pelletier, Soprano

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was formed in the 1994-1995 Centennial Season of Princeton University Concerts. The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Their repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This season’s programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of pianist Geoffrey Burleson, trombonist Benjamin Herrington, and soprano Sarah Pelletier. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Cristina Pato, Galician Bagpipe and the Cristina Pato Quartet Photo
Cristina Pato, Galician Bagpipe and the Cristina Pato Quartet Photo
Cristina Pato, Galician Bagpipe and the Cristina Pato Quartet Photo
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Cristina Pato, Galician Bagpipe and the Cristina Pato Quartet

Thursday, November 16, 2017, 6:00 PM & 9:00PM Dancebreak at 7:30pm (see information below) Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Latina and Migrations” – exploring the musical heritage of Cristina Pato and the gaita

6PM - Cristina Pato samples the diffusion of Latino music from her most recent CD “Latina,”
9PM - The ensemble returns to explore the gaita’s folk roots and legacy with selections from her CD “Migrations.”

Make a night of It and come to both concerts with a Dancebreak in between....

NEW THIS YEAR: DANCEBREAK!
Immerse yourself in the folk tradition at the heart of this year’s PUC125 series through dance classes offered in between three of the PUC125 events. This Galician dance class is inspired by the music performed at the 9pm concert by Cristina Pato, and led by professional dancer, Andres Camano.  Embrace the folk spirit in these events, free to all ticketholders. This Dancebreak will take place in the Music Room at Nassau Presbyterian Church. 

PLEASE NOTE:  You must have purchased tickets to one of the concerts in order to attend Dancebreak.  Tickets will be checked at the door.

About the Artist

The gaita, or Galician bagpipe, has an unmistakable sound: haunting, tender at moments, and ferocious in others. A member of Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, Cristina Pato is one of its few masters. “She’s a virtuoso, and when she opens the floodgates of her technique, the force can knock you back a few steps.” (The New York Times) In two different programs with her quartet, Pato will showcase all that her instrument and prodigious talent can offer. 

Cristina Pato Quartet

Cristina Pato, gaita, piano and vocals
Victor Prieto, accordion
Edward Perez, bass
Mauricio Zottarelli, drums

Artist Website

Cristina Pato »

Cristina Pato on NPR's TIny Desk Concerts

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Cristina Pato and her Quartet Play Fandango from her CD "Latina"

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“Her music gets to you if you open your heart. In fact it will pry open the gateway to your soul and if you resist, it will get you anyway.”

- The World Music Report
Benjamin Grosvenor, Piano Photo
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Benjamin Grosvenor, Piano

Thursday, November 9, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH French Suite No. 5 in G Major, BWV 816
BRAHMS 4 Klavierstücke, Op. 119 interspersed with BRETT DEAN Hommage à Brahms
DEBUSSY Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune (arr. Leonard Borwick/George Copeland)
BERG Piano Sonata, Op. 1
RAVEL Gaspard de la nuit

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About the Artist

Just past his 24th birthday, Benjamin Grosvenor is quickly becoming one of the world’s most decorated young pianists. When he signed to Decca Records in 2011, he became the youngest British musician ever to do so, and since then he has appeared with dozens of major orchestras on five continents. The New York Times writes, “He commands the stage with aristocratic ease … Mr. Grosvenor makes you sigh with joy … a temperament rare in yesteryear, let alone now.” His electrifying performances and understated virtuosity earned him the New York Philharmonic’s inaugural Ackman Prize last October, and there’s no question that his legacy will continue to blossom in the coming years. We’re proud to invite him to make his debut in Princeton with a program that highlights his wide expressive range and multidisciplinary musical intelligence, featuring works by Bach, Brahms, Debussy, Ravel, and Berg.

Artist Website

Benjamin Grosvenor »

Inside the Mind of a Prodigy: Benjamin Grosvenor on CNN

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Benjamin Grosvenor Plays Scarbo from Ravel's Gaspard de la Nuit

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“poetic and gently ironic, brilliant yet clear-minded, intelligent but not without humour, all translated through a beautifully clear and singing touch.”

- The Independent (London)
Meet The Music: Four Harmonious Friends Photo
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Meet The Music: Four Harmonious Friends

Saturday, November 4, 2017, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Come to Richardson Auditorium to hear The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center play a new musical and magical version of a very ancient story about an elephant, a monkey, a rabbit, and a bird who must learn to get along. Featuring a Japanese flute called the shinobue, Irish folk drums, a cello, and bass trombone—guess which instrument is which animal! Musicians from the Silk Road Project (Mike Block, Shane Shanahan, Kaoru Watanabe, and Steve Wilson) and Global Musicians Workshop join composer and host Bruce Adolphe to play his new and ancient tale plus new and improvised music on unusual instruments.  Recommended for ages 6-12.  The program is approximately one hour.

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Artist Website

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »
Tabea Zimmermann, Viola and Thomas Hoppe, Piano Photo
Tabea Zimmermann, Viola and Thomas Hoppe, Piano Photo
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Tabea Zimmermann, Viola and Thomas Hoppe, Piano

Thursday, October 26, 2017, 8:00 PM Musical Preview by La Vie en Cello - Princeton student cellists at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HINDEMITH Viola Sonata Op. 25, No. 4
SCHUBERT Viola Sonata in A Minor, D. 821 “Arpeggione”
SHULAMIT RAN Perfect Storm
SCHUMANN Märchenbilder for Viola and Piano, Op. 113
BRAHMS Sonata for Viola and Piano in F Minor, Op. 120, No. 1

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About the Artist

Two seasons ago in Richardson Auditorium, the phenomenal pan-European Arcanto Quartet dazzled us with a lush program of Romantic repertoire. Tabea Zimmermann, who is regularly cited as the world’s greatest living violist, made her Princeton debut during that performance, and our ears are still resonating with her singular, unforgettable tone. Now she returns triumphantly, treating us to a full evening of her majestic playing alongside pianist Thomas Hoppe. György Ligeti once said of the viola, the violin’s mysterious and unsung cousin: “the low C-string gives the viola a unique acerbity, compact, somewhat hoarse, with an aftertaste of wood, earth and tannic acid.” And indeed, in Zimmermann’s hands, the instrument sings just as it should, filled with “graceful athleticism and a feathery left-hand touch.” (The New York Times) Hoppe and Zimmermann will perform the cornerstones of the viola sonata repertoire, rarely heard on our stage, including Brahms’ late masterpiece Op. 120, No. 1 and Schubert’s wonderfully melodic “Arpeggione” Sonata.

BEYOND THE MUSIC...
Take your love of music, and this artist, even further with our Beyond the Music Programming.  Violist Tabea Zimmermann will be participating in two special events beyond the concert.

Live Music Meditation - Friday, October 27, 2017 at 12:30PM in the Lee Music Performance and Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex. Free and Open to the Public. No prior experience necessary.  MORE INFO ON ALL MINDFULNESS WITH MUSIC EVENTS>
PLAN TO ARRIVE EARLY:  Meditations are seated on a first come, first served basis, and tend to fill up quickly.  Once the room is at capacity, the meditation is closed.

Performers As Teachers - Friday, October 27, 2017 at 10AM in the Lee Music Performance and Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex. Tabea Zimmermann coaches Princeton student violists. Free and Open to the Public. MORE INFO ON ALL PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS EVENTS>

Artist Websites

Tabea Zimmermann »
Thomas Hoppe »

Tabea Zimmermann Plays Schubert

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Tabea Zimmermann plays an excerpt from Schubert "Arpeggione" Sonata - 3rd movt.

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“Zimmermann and Hoppe convincingly breathe new life and bring an astonishing array of colours and voices to a neglected area of the repertoire.”

- The Irish Times
Quatuor Mosaïques Photo
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Quatuor Mosaïques

Thursday, October 12, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Wendy Heller at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MOZART String Quartet No. 17 in B-flat Major, K. 458 “The Hunt”
MOZART String Quartet No. 15 in D Minor, K. 421
HAYDN String Quartet in C Major, Op. 20, No. 2, HOB III:32

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About the Artist

The sound of a world-class string quartet is much like the human voice: no two sound the same, and the personality of the artist shines through in the nuances of their expression. We are thrilled to kick off our 2017-2018 Concert Classics Series with one of the great and unique voices of the string quartet genre, Vienna’s Quatuor Mosaïques, as they celebrate their 30th anniversary. Renowned for their interpretations of 18th-century classics on gut-stringed instruments, Quatuor Mosaïques have brought the rich, delicate timbre of gut strings to modern audiences on four continents and in countless prestigious chamber music festivals. Their performances of the early Haydn quartets earned them the 2000 Gramophone Award and were heralded as “probing, visionary interpretations” by The Washington Post. This will be our first time hosting a period instrument quartet, and they promise to cast a spell with their core repertoire from the Galant era.

Artist Website

Quatuor Mosaïques »

Quatuor Mosaiques Plays Mozart Quartet K. 458 "Hunt" - 2nd Movt.

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“The group’s calling card has always been its probing, visionary interpretations of the early Haydn quartets, and indeed the [Haydn] quartet which opened the concert, was amazing. Here, the delicate gut strings on their period instruments perfectly caught the psychological tension.”

- The Washington Post
Barokksolistene, Bjarte Elke, Artistic Director Photo
Barokksolistene, Bjarte Elke, Artistic Director Photo
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Barokksolistene, Bjarte Elke, Artistic Director

Thursday, October 5, 2017, 6:00 PM and 9:30PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall and the new Lewis Center for the Arts Complex

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Program

"The Double Deal” – an evening with Henry Purcell from the theatre and court to the pub.  The concert at 6pm will feature the music of Purcell and his contemporaries.  At 9:30pm, the concert will feature "The Alehouse Sessions," an interactive and playful event that brings the raw rhythms of Scandinavian folk music to…the high baroque.  As the group likes to call it, "it's just old pop music."

About the Artist

The Norwegian Baroque ensemble Barokksolistene gracefully synthesize the vernacular music of their homeland with traditional repertoire, and here at Princeton they will treat us to a double-header: a 6pm in-the-round performance in Richardson of music from English theatres and the court in the time of Henry Purcell, followed by a 9:30pm “Alehouse Session” of songs and melodies from the pubs and taverns of 17th-century England. The “Alehouse Session” will take place in the newly opened Lewis Center Complex for the Arts to celebrate its arrival on campus. Please join for both, and bring an appetite for beer!

Artist Website

Barokksolistene »

Barokksolistene plays an Alehouse Session

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Barokksolistene plays The English Dancing Master from The Alehouse Sessions

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“Any group that can have a festival audience performing an Icelandic football chant has to be doing something right.”

- The Guardian (London)
Shostakovich and The Black Monk: A Russian Fantasy Photo
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Shostakovich and The Black Monk: A Russian Fantasy

Thursday, September 28, 2017, 7:30 PM Chekhov's The Black Monk: The Text Illuminated, a discussion with Professor Ellen Chances at 6:15pm, free to ticketholders (see information below) Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

featuring the EMERSON STRING QUARTET accompanied by an ensemble of seven actors inlcluding LEN CARIOU and JAY O. SANDERS, Directed by James Glossman

In Anton Chekhov’s classic short story The Black Monk, a brilliant scholar is haunted by hallucinations of a black monk and unravels in his obsessive quest for genius. This mystical story resonated with Dmitri Shostakovich, and he always dreamed of adapting it for an opera. But decades of suffering under an oppressive political regime wreaked havoc on the composer’s life, and he left the work unfinished. In a very special new project, the Emerson String Quartet is reimagining Shostakovich’s struggle to retell Chekhov’s story through a staged performance of his 14th String Quartet, accompanied by a cast of seven actors. This bold intersection of chamber music and theater speaks to the continuing adventurousness of the Emerson, who celebrate their 40th anniversary this season and have treated us to more inspired performances in Richardson Auditorium than we can count. Princeton University Concerts is proud to have been a part of commissioning this work, as part of our increasing mission to celebrate and nurture interdisciplinary, non-traditional projects. Dive deeply with us into the stories of Chekhov, Shostakovich, love, art, and madness.  Join us immediately following the production for a TALK BACK conversation between Professor Simon Morrison, violinist Philip Setzer and Writer/Director James Glossman, free to ticketholders.

Running time: approximately 90 minutes without intermission

_____________________________________________________________

DELVE DEEPER - CHEKHOV'S THE BLACK MONK: The Text Illuminated

Read Chekov's short story, The Black Monk, prior to the concert and join a free discussion with renowned Chekhov scholar Professor Ellen Chances, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Princeton University. The talk will take place in the Assembly Room at Nassau Presbyterian Church at 6:15pm and is free to all ticketholders.  The book can be bought at Labyrinth Bookstore on Nassau Street in Princeton, New Jersey for a 15% discount by mentioning the event.

This piece is co-commissioned by Princeton University Concerts, the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival, Tanglewood Music Festival and SUNY Stony Brook. Running time: approximately 90 minutes without intermission.

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About the Artist

Participating Artists:

Created by James Glossman and Philip Setzer
Written and Directed by James Glossman

The Emerson String Quartet

Eugene Drucker, Violin

Philip Setzer, Violin

Lawrence Dutton, Viola

Paul Watkins, Cello


Len Cariou, Dmitri Shostakovich
Jay O. Sanders, Josef Stalin
Ali Breneman, Younger Woman
Alex Glossman, Younger Man
Evelyn McGee-Colbert, Middle Woman
Paul Murphy, Older Man
Linda Setzer, Older Woman

Carolyn Kelson, Stage Manager
Bettina Bierly, Costume Designer
Christopher and Justin Swader, Scenic Designers
Julie Duro, Lighting Designer
Jeff Knapp, Multimedia Designer
 

 

Artist Website

Emerson String Quartet »

Violinst Phil Setzer and Director James Glossman talk about Shostakovich and The Black Monk

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“We are presenting a theatrical realization of Shostakovich’s vision of The Black Monk as an opera. The music will be woven into the fabric of the drama, much as Shostakovich’s personal story is interwoven with the Chekhov story in James Glossman’s script.”

- Phil Setzer, First Violinist of the Emerson String Quartet
Murray Perahia, Piano Photo
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Murray Perahia, Piano

Thursday, May 11, 2017, 8:00 PM Announcement and Reading of the 2017 Creative Reactions Winners at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Paderewski Memorial Concert

BACH French Suite No.6 in E major
SCHUBERT Impromptus Op. 142, D. 935
MOZART Rondo in A minor,  K. 511
BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 32 Op. 111

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About the Artist

Pianist Murray Perahia first graced our stage in the spring of 1976, shortly after winning the Leeds Piano Competition and earning his first record deal. Forty years later, he returns to Princeton as one of the most in uential pianists of our time, having performed with every leading orchestra to universal acclaim, all while enjoying the friendship of the likes of composer Benjamin Britten and pianist Vladimir Horowitz. The Chicago Tribune declares, “His commanding insights are more than enough to breathe freshness and distinction into works we've heard many times before, but seldom played at this inspired level.” But while his playing has been celebrated for its meticulous, jaw-dropping clarity, he  nds inspiration in the unpredictable: “What really counts for me,” Perahia reveals, “is spontaneity. I never give the same performance twice.” We are honored to have him close our season with one of his trademark unrepeatable evenings.

Artist Website

Murray Perahia »

“His place among the great pianists of our time is not disputed.”

- The Guardian (London)
Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano Photo
Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano Photo
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Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano

Sunday, April 30, 2017, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Breaking Ground” – music by J.S. Bach, Philip Glass, Arvo Pärt, Nico Muhly, with Finnish folksongs

About the Artist

According to The Telegraph (London), Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto “surely has the most personal sound of any classical violinist now alive.” Composer-pianist Nico Muhly is one of the most celebrated and sought-after classical composers of the last decade and is the youngest composer ever commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera. These ground-breaking classical musicians join forces for a hallmark program of their own curating that combines the music of J.S. Bach with contemporary fare.

Artist Websites

Pekka Kuusisto »
Nico Muhly »

Violinist Pekka Kuusisto plays and sings a popular finnish folksong

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“Kuusisto and Muhly brought a sense of such intimacy and spontaneity...more concerts should feel this way.”

- The Washington Post
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MINDFULNESS & MUSIC

Thursday, April 27, 2017, 12:30 PM Live Music Meditation with violinist Pekka Kuusisto and led by Matthew Weiner ASSEMBLY ROOM AT NASSAU PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (61 NASSAU ST)

Program

Join us for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and violinist Pekka Kuusisto.

Come for a half-hour guided meditation to music performed by Kuusisto, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary.  This is part of our Mindfulness with Music Program.This event is FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

Kuusisto will be joined by pianist/composer Nico Muhly at the final PUC125: Performances Up Close concert of our 2016-17 season on Sunday, April 30th, 2017 at 7:30PM. For more information about the concert, please click HERE.

Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin Photo
Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin Photo
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Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin

Thursday, April 20, 2017, 8:00 PM Musical Preview by the Princeton Girlchoir at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Violin duos by JEAN-MARIE LECLAIR, SERGEI PROKOFIEV, BÉLA BÁRTÓK, and JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

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About the Artist

Two of the most revered violinists of our generation come together for a special evening of rarely performed works for two violins. In 2000, Pamela Frank received the Avery Fisher Prize—perhaps the highest honor given to American instrumentalists. Teaching at Curtis and Peabody, her public concerts have been precious few in recent years. She has now returned to the concert stage, bringing her “big, rich sound ... that breathes with purpose” (Philadelphia Inquirer). The other half of the duo is none other than Christian Tetzlaff, who is becoming a staple at Richardson Auditorium after his extraordinary solo debut in 2012 and the sold-out follow-up with his eponymous trio last season. A violin duo is perhaps the most intimate and conversational of all the chamber music forms, and these two masters—who have been friends for decades—invite us into the discussion.

Artist Website

Christian Tetzlaff »

“Projection is one- third intellectual, one-third your soul, and one- third what you do with the right hand to spin those thoughts and feelings into sound. Christian is like a math genius of the bow.”

- Violinist Pamela Frank on her childhood friend Christian Tetzlaff
Béla Fleck, Banjo and Abigail Washburn, Banjo/Voice Photo
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Béla Fleck, Banjo and Abigail Washburn, Banjo/Voice

Thursday, April 13, 2017, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Selections from the duo's 2016 Grammy-winning recording for Best Folk Album: "Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn."

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About the Artist

Béla Fleck is one of the most innovative and in uential banjo players in the history of the instrument, often combining classical harmony with an e ortless Scruggs style. He was at the helm of such landmark groups as the Flecktones and the Africa Project, and recently wrote his first Banjo Concerto, commissioned and premiered by the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. With 15 Grammys and 30 nominations, he has been nominated in more musical categories than any other artist in Grammy history! The collaboration with his wife and fellow banjoist, Abigail Washburn, is one of the most magical in his catalogue, with the purity of two-part counterpoint in full force guided by Abigail’s soulful singing and claw-hammer style. In a season anchored by timeworn masterworks here at Princeton, Fleck and Washburn offer a slightly different perspective to the mix, drawing from the great vernacular music of Appalachia.

Artist Website

Béla Fleck »

Fleck & Washburn on CBS Sunday Morning

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“Their harmonic lines were as close-knit as their relationship, and there was warmth and wit woven through their performances, smiles and patter. But it’s their expressive range— in Washburn’s nostalgia-tinged voice and Fleck’s insouciant solos—that made the evening so compelling. If anyone can convince a skeptical world of the beauty of the banjo, it is this pair.”

- The Guardian (London)
Something Old, Something New Photo
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Something Old, Something New

Sunday, April 9, 2017, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Something Old, Something New" including a new work by Princeton composer/faculty Juri Seo

AUGUSTA READ THOMAS Scat for Oboe, Violin, Viola, Cello, and Piano
MARCO UCCELLINI Selections from Ozio
ANTONIO VIVALDI Cello Sonata No. 3 in A Minor
ARVO PÄRT Two Pieces for Violin, Cello and Piano
JURI SEO Rondeaux for Violin, Viola, Cello, Oboe/English Horn, Trombone, and Piano (World Premiere)

Musicians:

Wendy Young, Harpsichord
Margaret Kampmeier, Piano/Harpsichord
Mark Broschinsky, Trombone/Sackbut
Matthew Sullivan, Oboe
Anna Lim, Violin
Nancy Wilson, Violin
Jessica Thompson, VIola
Alistair MacRae, Cello
Calvin Wentling '18, Countertenor
 

About the Artist

Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Benjamin Bagby, Anglo-Saxon Harp and Voice Photo
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Benjamin Bagby, Anglo-Saxon Harp and Voice

Thursday, March 30, 2017, 6:00 PM Richarfson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Beowulf” – the epic book in a multi-media performance with Bagby playing the Anglo-Saxon harp and singing/reciting the Beowulf story. Bagby will be joined by Experiential Designer and Adobe Creative Resident  Craig Winslow who will bring the colorful characters and narrative to life through the use of projection.

Please note:  The concert starts promptly at 6:00pm and will last 85 minutes, with questions. Seating for this performance is on stage and is limited to just under 200 patrons seated in-the-round surrounding the musicians. Seating is general admission, and latecomers will not be seated immediately so as not to break the stream of music in an intimate setting. The seats are configured so that every patron will be close to the musicians, but please arrive early if you have a seating preference.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Watch as Bagby summons music’s magical capacity to travel across time and bring narrative to life. Accompanied by a six-string lyre, the riveting adventures of the legendary warrior Beowulf in his quest to defeat the horrific monster Grendel will be recited, chanted, and sung in the original Old English in which this illustrious 11th-century masterpiece was written. This production, critically acclaimed for almost two decades, is a rare chance to encounter one of the most popular texts in western literature as it was originally performed.

Artist Website

Benjamin Bagby »

“a double tour de force of scholarly excavation and artistic dynamism.”

- San Francisco Chronicle
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, March 16, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 7 in F Major, Op. 59. No. 1
String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130, with Op. 133 “Grosse Fuge”

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About the Artist

Our Beethoven Series closes with three celebrated works from the master’s middle and late periods. After this season, the Takács Quartet will no longer perform the Beethoven quartet cycle in its entirety, so this performance marks a final farewell bow for the legendary interpreters, who “play the Beethoven repertoire better than any quartet past or present” (The Cleveland Plain Dealer). The evening begins with the great “Razumovsky” Quartet Op. 59, No. 1. The piece marks Beethoven’s first foray into chamber music’s more expansive forms, setting the stage for later explorations. After intermission, they bring us the Quartet Op. 130, including the original last movement, the notorious "Grosse Fuge," which was so poorly received (“an indecipherable horror”) upon its premiere that Beethoven hastily replaced it with a more digestible Finale. But the bold and dense fugue is now considered a groundbreaking achievement—Stravinsky famously called it “an absolutely contemporary piece of music that will be contemporary forever.”

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“The consummate artistry of the Takács is simply breathtaking.”

- The Guardian (London)
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with the quartet, hosted by Scott Burnham Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 6 in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6
String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135
String Quartet No. 9 in C Major, Op. 59, No. 3

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About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here is one you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  Monday, March 13, 2017 at 7pm in Taplin Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.  Please note that this class was originally scheduled for Tuesday, March 14 but was changed due to the impending weather.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“No other composer has posed so many questions about the form and emotional content of a string quartet, and come up with so many different answers. The need we feel to revisit our interpretations of the quartets is inspired in part by the spirit of exploration that runs through them.”

- From Beethoven For A Later Age: Living with the String Quartets by Edward Dusinberre (First Violinist of the Takács String Quartet)
Meet The Music: Albert & Wolfgang Photo
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Meet The Music: Albert & Wolfgang

Saturday, March 11, 2017, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

The musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and host Bruce Adolphe return on Pi Day Weekend with a program that honors Princeton’s own Albert Einstein.

BRUCE ADOLPHE, Albert Einstein
LLEWELLYN SANCHEZ-WERNER, Piano
DANBI UM, Violin
MATTHEW LIPMAN, Viola
NICHOLAS CANELLAKIS, Cello

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Meet the Music!  Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she encounters chamber music in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.

A group of physics students await their teacher on their first day of class, and who should appear but Albert Einstein! Einstein once said, “Mozart’s music is so pure and beautiful that I see it as a reflection of the inner beauty of the universe.” In his day, Einstein performed Mozart sonatas on the violin and played chamber music with professional musicians all over the world. Join us for an adventure with Einstein and Mozart! Featuring the music of Mozart and Adolphe.

Artist Website

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »

VIDEO PREVIEW: Click to Meet the Music at Richardson Auditorium on March 11, 2017

More videos at discover and listen »
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MINDFULNESS & MUSIC

Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 12:30 PM Live Music Meditation with SO Percussion and led by Matthew Weiner Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

Join us for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and our Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence SO Percussion  Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary.  This is part of our Mindfulness with Music Program.This event is FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

Hagen String Quartet Photo
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Hagen String Quartet

Thursday, March 2, 2017, 8:00 PM Musical Preview featuring siblings Sarah and Solene Le Van '18 at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, D. 87
SHOSTAKOVICH Quartet No. 12 in D-flat Major, Op. 133
DVOŘÁK Quartet No. 14 in A-flat Major, Op. 105

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Over a three-decade career, the Hagen Quartet have become an unmatched presence on the European chamber music scene, touring and collaborating at a whirlwind pace while releasing forty- five CDs for Deutsche Grammophon. They formed in Salzburg in 1981 and have remained Austria-based, with Vienna’s Die Presse heralding them as “the highest art of existence.” We were very fortunate to host them on an infrequent U.S. tour in 2012, and we are doubly fortunate to invite them back in 2017! The group—which includes three siblings—will be performing on the four Stradivarius instruments previously owned by the Paganini, Cleveland, and Tokyo Quartets. Their program is a sample of chamber music at its  nest and most exciting, from a great quartet whose unusual interpretations are always full of surprises.

PLUS THERE'S MORE....PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS

in addition to the concert, 2nd violinist of the Hagen Quartet, Rainer Schmidt will coach Princeton student quartets.  The coaching takes place on March 2 at 10AM in Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall and is free open to the public.

“Nothing as it seems. And it is certainly not as we thought we knew it. That is the Hagen Quartet’s message.”

- HAMBURGER ABENDBLATT
England’s Green Photo
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England’s Green

Sunday, February 19, 2017, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"England's Green and Pleasant Land"

RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Merciless Beauty, 3 Rondels for 2 Violins, Cello, and Voice
FRANK BRIDGE Novelletten, H. 44
GERALD FINZI Five Bagatelles, Op. 23 for Clarinet and Piano
JOHN MCCABE Three Folk Songs for Clarinet, Piano, and Voice
BENJAMIN BRITTEN Folk Songs for Voice and Piano
EDWARD ELGAR Serenade for String Orchestra, Op. 20
 

About the Artist

MUSICIANS:

Rochelle Ellis, Soprano
David Kellett, Tenor
Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet
Anna Lim, Violin
Eric Wyrick, Violin
Emma Powell '17, Violin
Danielle Farina, Viola
Alberto Parrini, Cello
Elizabeth DiFelice Piano
Michael Pratt, Conductor
 


Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Colin Currie, Percussion Photo
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Colin Currie, Percussion

Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Realismos Mágicos” – solo percussion music by Per Norgaard, Toshio Hosokawa, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis and Rolf Wallin's eleven short pieces based on Gabriel García Márquez short stories.  Currie will be joined by actor Michael Dean Morgan who read excerpts from Garcia Márquez' stories as part of the presentation.

COMPLETE PROGRAM:

ELLIOTT CARTER Figment V for Solo Marimba
PER NØRGÅRD "Fire over Water” from I-Ching for Solo Percussion
TOSHIO HOSOKAWA Remniscence for Solo Marimba
BRUNO MANTOVANI Moi, jeu... for Solo Marimba
KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN Vibra-Elufa for Solo Vibraphone
ROLF WALLIN  Realismos Mágicos for Solo Marimba

About the Artist

One of the most internationally sought-after solo percussionists of our time, Colin Currie will perform feats of percussion acrobatics, bouncing seamlessly between instruments with his hallmark “cool headed brilliance” (The Daily Telegraph, London). Having premiered works by most of today’s leading composers, all of Colin Currie’s performances sparkle with novelty and spontaneity. With the seemingly in nite range of sounds conjured by his instruments, Currie will show music at its most primal, liberating, and unexpected.

Artist Websites

Colin Currie »
Michael Dean Morgan »

“Surely the world’s best and most daring percussionist”

- The Spectator (London)
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putnins, Artistic Director Photo
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Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putnins, Artistic Director

Thursday, February 9, 2017, 8:00 PM Princeton University Chapel

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Program

“Northern Land & Spirit,” choral works by ARVO PÄRT, PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY, VELJO TORMIS and JEAN SIBELIUS

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About the Artist

Our spring season kicks off with the beloved Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir in their first visit to the Northeast since selling out Carnegie Hall in June 2014. The music of their homeland, in all its glory and gravitas, anchors their mission and repertoire, but the 25-voice ensemble brings equal might to everything from Gregorian chant to the present day. The Washington Post declares, “the choir’s performances inspire a transporting awe,” while Newsday praises their “music-making of sublime and self-abnegating mastery.” They have been nominated for no less than fourteen Grammy’s across a range of styles, and they visit Princeton with a program of favorites from Northern Europe: Tchaikovsky, Tormis, Sibelius, and the uncrowned king of Estonian music, Arvo Pärt, whose vocal music is written exclusively for the EPCC. Our beautiful and resounding University Chapel will be the perfect space to revel in the power of the human voice.

Artist Website

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir »

“Pure, powerful and unabashedly spiritual.”

- The Washington Post
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LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 10:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

CALLING ALL AMATEUR STRING PLAYERS:  WE WANT YOU!

Following the performance of the Takács String Quartet on January 19, 2017, at approximately 10pm,  amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to join the Takács Quartet for a community sight-reading of Beethoven String Quartet Op. 18, No. 4.  This annual event coincides with the Beethoven String Quartet Cycle played by the Takács Quartet throughtout the current season. Audience is also invited to stay after the performances to enjoy the sight reading session.  It is always a positive celebration of our collective love of music. Players do not need to have concert tickets to participate in the Late Night Chamber Jam, but reservations are required. SIGN UP NOW>

Enjoy excerpts from the 2015 Late Night Chamber Jam, held annually.

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Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 3 in D Major, Op. 18, No. 3
String Quartet No. 8 in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2
String Quartet No. 12 in E-flat Major, Op. 127

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

Please note: THIS CONCERT WILL BE FOLLOWED BY THE LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM.  For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“The Takacs Quartet might play this repertoire (Beethoven) better than any other quartet in the past or present.”

- The Cleveland Plain Dealer
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with Scott Burnham and members of the quartet Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 5 in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5
String Quartet No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 18, No. 4
String Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

WAIT! THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, with 2 classes remaining on January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Open Rehearsal:  time and place tbd.  Check back for more details.

3. Late Night Chamber Jam: Amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to sight read a Beethoven String Quartet with the Takács String Quartet.  LEARN MORE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“This is chamber music of overwhelming intensity - simply the best I've ever heard.”

- The Guardian (London)
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, November 17, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1
String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 74 “Harp”
String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 131

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

We are absolutely thrilled and honored to be hosting the Takács Quartet for six concerts this season as they perform the Beethoven string quartet cycle in its entirety. Hailed as “chamber music playing of overwhelming intensity ... simply the best I’ve seen in concert” (The Guardian, London), their 2006 box set of the sixteen quartets has become the high-water mark for these masterworks. We have included two of their programs in our Concert Classics Series, of which this special evening is the first. The program proceeds chronologically, beginning with Beethoven’s Quartet Op. 18, No. 1, influenced by Haydn and deeply rooted in the 18th-century quartet tradition. His Quartet Op. 74 follows, nicknamed “Harp” for the arpeggiating pizzicato figure in the first movement. After intermission, we are treated to the tremendous, seven-movement Op. 131. Upon hearing a performance of the quartet for the first time, Schubert remarked, “After this, what is left for us to write?”

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, taking place on November 16; January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought as a series, or individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Mindfulness & Music: Join us on November 16 at 12:30pm for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet. Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary. READ MORE HERE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“The Takács might play Beethoven better than any other quartet in the past or the present.”

- The Cleveland Plain Dealer
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MINDFULNESS & MUSIC

Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 12:30 PM Live Music Meditation with the Takács String Quartet and led by Matthew Weiner Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

Join us for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet.  Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary.  This is part of our Mindfulneeds with Music Program, and is special event in celebration of our Beethoven String Quartet Cycle this year.
This event is FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with the quartet, hosted by Scott Burnham Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2
String Quartet No. 11 in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso”
String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 with Finale

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of democracy. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, taking place on November 16; January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought as a series, or individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Mindfulness & Music: Join us on November 16 at 12:30pm for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet. Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary. READ MORE HERE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“Beethoven’s 16 string quartets were written over a 27-year span of his life, and they range from the wide-eyed energy and variety of his first six quartets to the enigmatic and existential worlds of his final five quartets. It is impossible to think of a more compelling window onto Beethoven, onto the genre of the string quartet, or even onto the entire multifarious pageant of chamber music in the modern West.”

- Professor Scott Burnham on the Beethoven String Quartets
Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds Photo
Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds Photo
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Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds

Saturday, November 5, 2016, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"WONDERFUL WINDS" — Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she encounters chamber music in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Back by popular demand, pianist Orli Shaham will introduce pre-school-aged kids to the joy of live classical music played, in an interactive concert especially created for children age 3 to 6 and their families. You'll meet all the instruments in the woodwind family and see how to make music just by breathing.  Internationally renowned concert pianist Orli Shaham is your host, along with special guest woodwind quintet, Windsync in their Princeton debut. Aaron Copland's Hoedown will set your toes tapping and you'll be riveted by the classic musical tale Peter and the Wolf.  And, of course, plenty of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, and more.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Orli Shaham is an internationally renowned pianist.  She travels all over the world giving concerts and many of today's most important composers have written pieces for her, including Princeton's own Steven Mackey who has written a piece for her. Orli created the Baby Got Bach series in 2010 series because she thought that there weren’t enough opportunities for pre-school aged kids to hear really great live classical music.  Baby Got Bach is recognized by parents, media and the music community as a significant force in music education and entertainment for pre-schoolers.  The program is in-residence at the 92nd Street Y in New York City, and has been cited in New York Magazine’s “Best of New York” list. Orli has also taken Baby Got Programs on tour all over the country.

Special guests Windsync have been hailed by the Houston Chronicle as “revolutionary chamber musicians.”  They are internationally recognized for dramatic and engaging interpretations of classical music.  Gold Medalist in the National Fischoff Chamber Music Competition and winner of the Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh International Competition, this dynamic ensemble focuses on building a connection with audiences through adventurous programming and charismatic stage presence. These five virtuoso players perform exclusively from memory and specialize in creative concerts that inspire and entertain audiences of all ages.

Artist Websites

Orli Shaham »
WindySync »
Sergei Babayan, Piano and Daniil Trifonov, Piano Photo
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Sergei Babayan, Piano and Daniil Trifonov, Piano

Thursday, October 27, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

SCHUMANN Andante and Variations in B-flat Major, Op. 46
SCHUBERT Fantasie in F Minor for Piano Four Hands, D. 940
BRAHMS Hungarian Dances WoO. 1
RACHMANINOFF Two Suites for Two Pianos

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

At the age of 25, Daniil Trifonov has already established himself as one of the finest living pianists. “A fully formed virtuoso with an artistic soul to match his mighty fingers” (Seattle Times), he has appeared with all of the “Big Five” U.S. orchestras, swept First Prize and Audience Prize at both the Rubinstein and Tchaikovsky Competitions, and given a solo recital at Carnegie Hall to uproarious acclaim. Amid his touring schedule, though, he manages to continue study at The Cleveland Institute of Music, under the tutelage of prominent Armenian pianist Sergei Babayan. In an extremely special evening, this student and teacher come together to perform a program of 19th-century piano duos. It will be the  rst two-piano program on our series since 1982, and an unusual opportunity to witness such an intimate relationship enacted onstage—the cherished passing of music from one generation to the next will be right before our eyes.

 

Join us for more...
PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS

Daniil Trifonov will coach student members of the Princeton Pianists Ensemble on Friday, October 28, 2016 at 9:30AM in Richardson Auditorium.  This event is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

 

Artist Websites

Daniil Trifonov »
Sergei Babayan »

pianists Sergei Babayan and Daniil Trifonov play Rachmaninoff Suite for Two Pianos

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Pianists Sergei Babayan and Daniil Trifonov play Rachmaninoff Suite for Two Pianost Live at teh Verbier Festival

More audio at discover and listen »

“(Trifonov) has everything and more...technically incredible...his touch—he has tenderness and also the demonic element. I never heard anything like that.”

- Pianist Martha Argerich
Melting Pot Photo
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Melting Pot

Sunday, October 16, 2016, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

"Melting Pot" - Music with Folk Influences from the New World

Three American Folk Songs for brass quintet arr. Andrew Rinfleisch
CHARLES IVES  Piano Trio
Modern Ballads for brass quintet and percussion
WILLIAM BOLCOM Select Cabaret Songs for Voice & Piano
PAQUITO D’RIVERA Four Pieces for Brass Quintet and Percussion

MUSICIANS:
Sarah Pelletier, Soprano; Geoffrey Burleson, Piano; Anna Lim, Violin; Susannah Chapman, Cello; Wayne DuMaine, Trumpet; Henry Whitaker '17, Trumpet; Chris Komer, Horn; Benjamin Herrington, Trombone; Brian Brown, Tuba; John Ferrari, Percussion
 

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Belcea String Quartet Photo
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Belcea String Quartet

Thursday, October 13, 2016, 8:00 PM Musical Preview at 7PM by alums of the Royal College of Music/Princeton University Exchange program, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

SCHUBERT Quartet No. 12 in C Minor, D. 703 “Quartettsatz”
BRAHMS Quartet in A Minor, Op. 51, No. 2
SCHUBERT Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, D. 810 “Death and the Maiden”

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Twenty years ago, a group of young string players at London’s Royal College of Music came together around a collective passion for the string quartet repertoire and its endless capacity for reinterpretation. A few years later, their rendering of the Debussy and Ravel string quartets won the Gramophone Award for Best Debut Recording, and the rest is history. The Guardian (London) describes the intensity of a Belcea performance well: “[they] seize the music’s energy, shocking us out of our seats with every fortissimo.” And in addition to their eternally youthful energy, they are deeply committed to mentoring emerging groups and fostering a landscape of young quartet players—the Belcea Quartet Trust is an ambitious new project that offers intensive coaching sessions for ensembles on the rise. In their Princeton debut (and a rare visit to the United States), they will perform works by two great melodicists, Schubert and Brahms. Prepare to drive home with tunes running through your head!

Artist Website

Belcea String Quartet »

Belcea Quartet plays Brahms live at Carnegie Hall

More videos at discover and listen »

Belcea String Quartet plays the Scherzo from Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" Quartet

More audio at discover and listen »

“a spiritual depth and expressive urgency that leaves you eager to hear more.”

- The New York Times
Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano Photo
Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano Photo
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Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Lindsey Christiansen from Westminster Choir College at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

JOAQUIN TURINA Songs from Homenaje a Lope de Vega
JOHANNES BRAHMS  Select songs
ANTONIN DVORAK  Cigánské melodie, Op. 55
CHARLES IVES  Select songs
JEAN SIBELIUS  Select songs

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About the Artist

A young mezzo from Georgia is currently taking the world by storm, and her name is Jamie Barton. Sporting a nose ring and an ebullient smile, Barton summons a tone that has earned her comparisons to many of the mid-20th century greats—and indeed, the magnificent Marilyn Horne called a recent recital “one of the greatest I’ve ever heard.” Just this year she won the prestigious Richard Tucker Award, an honor conferred annually on a rising American star that places her in the lineage of Renée Fleming and Joyce DiDonato. But as her voice becomes a staple in large opera houses, we are thrilled to invite her into the more immediate and personal setting of Richardson Auditorium to ring in opening night of Princeton University Concerts’ 2016-2017 mainstage series! She brings us a program of late Romantic lieder, a wonderful showcase for her richly detailed instrument which the Los Angeles Times calls “the darkly creamy lager that poured forth from altos of yore.”

PLUS, THERE'S MORE...

Jamie Barton will appear on the PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS series
Friday, October 7, 2016 at 12:30PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall
Come peek behind the scenes as Jamie Barton coaches talented Princeton students.  This event is free and open to the public.
 

Artist Website

Jamie Barton »

Jamie Barton Takes 5 with Opera News

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Mezzo-Soprano Jamie Barton sings Donizetti's O mon Ferand at the 2012 Richard Tucker Gala

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“She is a great artist, no question, with an imperturbable steadiness of tone, and a nobility of utterance that invites comparison not so much with her contemporaries as with mid-20th century greats.”

- The Guardian (London)
Augustin Hadelich, Violin and Pablo Sáinz Villegas, Guitar Photo
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Augustin Hadelich, Violin and Pablo Sáinz Villegas, Guitar

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Histoire du Tango” – works by Astor Piazzolla, Manuel De Falla, Eugène Ysaÿe, Roland Dyens, and a world premiere by composer Lorenzo Palomo.  Lighting designer Kate Ashton will create an atmosphere that reinforces the character and emotional message of each work on this multimedia program

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About the Artist

Making their Princeton debut, Grammy-award winning violin phenomenon Augustin Hadelich and Spanish guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas bring highlights from their popular album, Histoire du Tango, to Princeton University Concerts.

With audience seated around them directly on the stage, the artists will trace the history of Argentina's national dance in Astor Piazzolla's title track and stir up folk, gypsy and flamenco dances. Transforming the stage into an Argentine nightclub with the help of light-designer Kate Ashton, the duo will present two performances, each an hour long. Seating is very limited. Audience will have a chance to interact with the artists following the performance.

Artist Websites

Augustin Hadelich »
Pablo Sáinz-Villegas »

Hadelich and Villegas talk about their CD "Histoire du Tango"

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“Hadelich’s playing combined impressive technical command with plush, rich-textured sound. And with magisterial poise and serene control...”

- The New York Times
Matthias Goerne, Baritone with Alexander Schmalcz, Piano Photo
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Matthias Goerne, Baritone with Alexander Schmalcz, Piano

Thursday, April 28, 2016, 8:00 PM Preview Event featuring the winners of the 2016 Creative Reactions Contest at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Die Schöne Mullerin, D. 795

Please note that this concert will be performed without intermission.  The running length of the concert will be an estimated 75 minutes.  There will be no late seating so plan to get to the concert early.

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About the Artist

Tim Smith of The Baltimore Sun once wrote, “If you are very, very lucky, you get to hear a performance every now and then that is so sublime in execution, so profound in expressive realization that it will have a place with you for the rest of your life. I felt I had one of those experiences when baritone Matthias Goerne sang [Schubert]. I felt privileged to witness it.” And lo and behold, in our own intimate Richardson Auditorium, we close our Concert Classics series with a touch of the transcendent as Goerne comes and performs the entire Die Schöne Mullerin song cycle by Schubert. Goerne’s voice is typically heard in giant rooms like Carnegie or Disney Hall, but for lieder, and especially the deeply personal lieder of Schubert at his peak, Richardson is a much more immediate environment to experience this music as it was created and intended. He has been called the heir of the late Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, singing the repertoire that made him a star.

Artist Website

Matthias Goerne »

Matthias Goerne sings Das Wandern from Die Schoene Mullerin

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“...one of the most compelling and insightful performances of Schubert I have ever heard.”

- The New York Times
Julien Labro, Accordion/Bandoneon/Accordina  Gregg Kallor, Piano Photo
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Julien Labro, Accordion/Bandoneon/Accordina Gregg Kallor, Piano

Thursday, April 14, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

The Big Squeeze,  two one-hour concerts offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

Accordion virtuoso Julien Labro can do it all. Equally at home performing traditional Latin music in performing arts centers, free jazz in clubs, and hooks on techno tracks, Labro is a true Renaissance man. At 6pm, he brings us  a program of accordion music from around the world, featuring works by Bernhard Molique, Astor Piazzolla, Isaac Albéniz, Gabriel Fauré, Fernando Otero and Labro himself.  At 9pm, Labro and Kallor are joined by Jorge Roeder, bass and Richie Barshay, drums for a jazz nightcap.

Take the trip in just 60 minutes and experience a variety of cultures through the musical styles of Julien Labro as he performs the accordion, bandoneon and accordina, three relatively unknown instruments in North America, and shows how they have been incorporated into various genres of music across different regions around the world. Travel to France with the accordina and see how jazz musicians use this unique instrument to express their creativity, emotions and, of course, romance. This journey will also feature a stop in Argentina, where the melancholic yet passionate musical tones of the bandoneon inspired Astor Piazzolla to develop Nuevo Tango, a genre of music once so controversial that he was banned from the country. Last but not least, the accordion will take you throughout Europe, South America, and North America as Julien shows how it has been adopted by each region into the Classical, Jazz and Pop genres.

These informal concerts will feature music introduced by the artist. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with Mr. Labro.

ENCORE!

In between the two “Big Squeeze” programs, squeeze in some art! The Princeton University Art Museum will salute the concerts’ South American repertoire with two special, 30-minute tours of its Art of the Ancient Americas galleries. Free and open to all, Encore presents the chance to extend the Performance Up Close to a “culture up close,” whether as a coda after the 6PM concert, a prelude to the 9PM concert, or an interlude for those attending both events. Two tours start at 7:30pm and 8:00pm.  Refreshments will be served.

About the Artist

Heralded as “the next accordion star” by Howard Reich of The Chicago Tribune, Julien Labro has established himself as one of the foremost accordion and bandoneón players in both the classical and jazz genres. Deemed to be “a triple threat: brilliant technician, poetic melodist and cunning arranger,” his artistry, virtuosity, and creativity as a musician, composer and arranger have earned him international acclaim and continue to astonish audiences worldwide. Picking up the accordion at the tender age of 9, French-born Labro was influenced early on by traditional folk music and the melodic, lyrical quality of the French chanson. Upon discovering the music of jazz legends like Charlie Parker and Miles Davis, he quickly became inspired by the originality, freedom, creativity, and the endless possibilities in their musical language.

Artist Website

Julien Labro »

Accordian Player Julien Labro talks about his instruments

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Julien Labro plays Astor Piazzolla with the Spektral Quartet

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“Brilliant accordionist”

- Chicago Tribune
Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
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Paul Lewis, Piano

Thursday, April 7, 2016, 8:00 PM Preview event at 7pm featuring Ellipses Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Sonata No. 9 in B Major, D. 575
BRAHMS
Three Intermezzi, Op. 117
BRAHMS Four Ballades, Op. 10
LISZT Après une lecture du Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonata (“Dante” Sonata)

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About the Artist

Last season at Princeton, violinist Lisa Batiashvili and pianist Paul Lewis treated us to an extraordinary program of works by Schubert and Beethoven. It was the first time Lewis, a concert hall staple and veteran interpreter of the central European canon, was on our stage, and we were unsatisfied with only one concert. Hence, he returns this year to perform alone in an evening of mid-Romantic masterworks, including Schubert’s great Sonata in B Major. This music finds him at the absolute top of his game, and arguably at the top of anyone’s game. Of his recordings of the complete Beethoven sonatas, Anthony Tommasini writes in The New York Times, “if I had to recommend a single complete set, I would suggest Mr. Lewis’s distinguished recordings.” And, of his live performance of the last three Schubert sonatas in Boston in 2013, The Boston Globe said it was “the most audacious, most edifying, and most fulfilling musical event of the season.” These recommendations pretty much speak for themselves—spend your Thursday night hearing some of the best Romantic piano playing in the world.

Come early to check out Ellipses, Princeton's Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community.

Plus there's more...

Paul Lewis will give a FREE MASTERCLASS when he coaches Princeton piano students.
Friday, April 8, 2016 at 10AM-12PM
Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Free and open to the public.
 

Artist Website

Pianist Paul Lewis plays Schubert

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Paul Lewis plays Bach live in Richardson Auditorium

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“Here is fresh, intelligent yet daring playing alert to the flights of wildness in the music.”

- The New York Times
Parisian Spring Photo
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Parisian Spring

Sunday, April 3, 2016, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Parisian Spring"

CLAUDE DEBUSSY Trio for Flute, Viola, Harp
MAURICE RAVEL Chansons madécasses for Mezzo-soprano, Flute and Cello
JACQUES IBERT 2 Stèles orientées for Soprano and Flute
MANUEL DE FALLA Psyché for Soprano, Flute, Harp, Violin, Viola, Cello
DARIUS MILHAUD 3 Little Symphonies

About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students

Escher String Quartet Photo
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Escher String Quartet

Thursday, March 24, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Composer’s Last Words," Part Two - a one-hour concert offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

BRITTEN String Quartet No. 3
SCHUBERT String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, “Death and the Maiden”

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the quartet.

CALLING ALL AMATEUR STRING PLAYERS:  WE WANT YOU!

Following the 9pm performance, amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to join the Escher Quartet for a community sight-reading of a string quartet.  It's another LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM. Click here for more information. 

About the Artist

Adam Barnett-Hart, Violin • Aaron Boyd, Violin • Pierre Lapointe, Viola • Brook Speltz, Cello

NYC-based Escher Quartet is quickly on the rise, serving as artists-in-residence at The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, where last season they presented a critically acclaimed 3-concert series featuring the quartets of Benjamin Britten. They have received acclaim for its profound musical insight and rare tonal beauty. Championed by the Emerson String Quartet, the group was on the BBC New Generation Artists scheme from 2010-2012, giving debuts at both the Wigmore Hall and the BBC Proms at Cadogan Hall. In its home town of New York.  In 2013, the Quartet became one of the very few chamber ensembles to be awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

Artist Website

Escher String Quartet »

Escher Quartet plays Beethoven

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Escher Quartet plays the Scherzo from Mendelssohn Quartet No. 4

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“...one of the top young quartets before the public today...This is a group to watch.”

- The Washington Post
Baby Got Bach: Principally Percussion Photo
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Baby Got Bach: Principally Percussion

Sunday, March 20, 2016, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

NEW THIS SEASON — Building on the success of “Meet the Music,” we are excited to now presents it’s first concert geared towards children ages 3-6 and their families. Hosted by world-renowned pianist Orli ShahamBaby Got Bach: “Principally Percussion,” will feature Princeton’s esteemed Ensemble-in-Residence Sō Percussion and American Ballet Theatre dancer Rachel Richardson. This interactive concert will explore all of the sounds a piano and percussion can make through the music of J.S. Bach, Steve Reich, John Cage, and Princeton's own Steven Mackey. Kids are invited to stay afterward to come on stage and jam with the musicians!

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About the Artist

Orli Shaham is an internationally renowned pianist.  She travels all over the world giving concerts and many of today's most important composers have written pieces for her, including Princeton's own Steven Mackey who has written a piece for her that will be heard in its Princeton debut at this concert. Orli created the Baby Got Bach series in 2010 series because she thought that there weren’t enough opportunities for pre-school aged kids to hear really great live classical music.  Baby Got Bach is recognized by parents, media and the music community as a significant force in music education and entertainment for pre-schoolers.  The program is in-residence at the 92nd Street Y in New York City, and has been cited in New York Magazine’s “Best of New York” list. Orli has also taken Baby Got Programs on tour all over the country.  This concert respresents Baby Got Bach’s Princeton University Concerts debut.

Guest artists So Percussion, are Princeton's Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence. Sō Percussion has redefined the scope of the modern percussion ensemble.  Their repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as David Lang, and Princeton's Steven Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Worden, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

Rachel Richardson joined the Amercian Ballet Theatre as an apprentice in January 2015 and became a member of the corps de ballet in June 2015.  Her repertoire includes Columbine and one of the Nutcracker's Sisters in The Nutcracker, as well as roles in all of the Company's full-length ballets.

Artist Websites

Orli Shaham »
SO Percussion »

Orli Shaham plays Steve Reich's Clapping Music

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Ébène String Quartet Photo
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Ébène String Quartet

Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

Two one-hour concerts, offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

Back by popular demand are the four members of the astounding Ébène Quartet. Come for the gavotte, but stay for the lindy-hop: these remarkable chameleons will begin the evening with an all-French program from the traditional string quartet literature of Debussy and Dutilleux at 6pm, but will then transform Richardson stage into the Cotton Club with pieces from their collection of jazz favorites at 9pm.

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About the Artist

Pierre Colombet, Violin • Gabriel Le Magadure, Violin • Adrien Boisseau, Viola • Raphaël Merlin, Cello

“Someday My Prince Will Come” says the Disney song. He will indeed, on March 9, and he’s bringing three other princes with him. They are the virtuosos of the Ébène Quartet, whose concert on our season last year was unforgettable.  They are four Frenchmen known for moving seamlessly and with élan between classical and jazz (“Jazzical”?), enriching performances of each with the magic of the other. “A string quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band,” lauded The New York Times, and in praising their recent Carnegie Hall performance of a Schumann Quartet, The Times said the finale “took on a decidedly jazzy swing.” The Boston Globe hails the Quartet’s non-classical fare as “exciting and ear-opening.” With one program devoted to classical music and a second one devoted to jazz, you might hear some Miles Davis or, in a nod to a local boy, a moving take on Bruce Springsteen’s Streets of Philadelphia, performed with instrumental majesty and surprisingly princely vocals.

Artist Website

Ébène String Quartet »

Ébène Quartet plays Mendelssohn

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The Ébène Quartet plays Miserlou from Pulp Fiction

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“a string quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band”

- The New York Times
Alexander Melnikov, Piano Photo
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Alexander Melnikov, Piano

Sunday, March 6, 2016, 2:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SHOSTAKOVICH The Complete Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87

Please note: this concert is approximately 3 hours with two 20-minute intermissions

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About the Artist

After Isabelle Faust takes on the Bach Sonatas and Partitas, pianist Alexander Melnikov will tackle a wildly different but equally tremendous cycle: Shostakovich’s complete 24 Preludes and Fugues. Composed at the height of his popularity after the Second World War, these pieces are quintessential Shostakovich: sometimes sarcastic, sometimes wistful, and almost always politically charged. Russian-born Melnikov is one of the only pianists to commit this daunting cycle to recording, and did it in dazzling fashion: his 2010 recording was included in BBC Music Magazine’s list of the “50 Greatest Recordings of All Time.” Another critic reflects on his interpretation: “everything is testament to reflection and skill, yet the pianist is not lecturing, but laughing, dreaming, lamenting and dancing” (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung). Following this stunning critical reception, he makes a rare live appearance at Princeton focusing on these extraordinary pieces from Russia’s most controversial composer.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE REPERTOIRE...

INSIDE THE SHOSTAKOVICH PRELUDES & FUGUES FOR PIANO WITH SIMON MORRISON
a class in collaboration with the Princeton Adult School
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 7-8:30PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

In the lead up to this extraordinary concert, Princeton Professor Simon Morrison, one of the world’s leading experts on Russian and Soviet music, will untangle the mysteries of these pieces and illuminate their importance, giving class members an insider’s knowledge of what to expect from the performance.  This is a rare opportunity to immerse yourself in these rarely heard pieces from Russia’s most controversial composer.

This class is offered through the Princeton Adult School. To sign up, visit thier website or call 609-683-1101.

Class:  $40
Class, plus a concert ticket: $76

Artist Website

Alexander Melnikov »

Alexander Melnikov plays Shostakovich Prelude No. 1. His recoring of the complete Preludes and Fugues was called "one of the 50 greatiest recordings of all time" by BBC Music Magazine.

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“Melnikov reveals a kaleidoscope of colours and moods. An exhilarating experience.”

- BBC Music Magazine
Tetzlaff Trio Photo
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Tetzlaff Trio

Thursday, February 25, 2016, 8:00 PM Musical Preview featring the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUMANN Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80
DVORÁK Trio No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 90, “Dumky”
BRAHMS Trio No. 1 in B Major, Op. 8

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About the Artist

Christian Tetzlaff, Violin  • Tanja Tetzlaff, Cello  •  Lars Vogt, Piano

In the crowded and entangled landscape of violin virtuosi, Christian Tetzlaff is simply one of a kind. Noted for his “anti-lyrical” sound and preference for wide dynamic range over soloistic bombast, he has achieved superstardom over the course of three decades in the public eye. Following a triumphant solo recital two seasons ago on our series, he returns this year with the Tetzlaff Trio, a rare configuration that includes pianist Lars Vogt and cellist (and sister) Tanja Tetzlaff. It will be the first piano trio on our stage in over ten years, and we are celebrating the occasion with a program of absolute treasures—works by Brahms, Schumann and Dvorák that anchor the 19th-century piano trio repertoire. This is not a collection of artists who tour through the states together more than once in a blue moon, so please be sure to put this one on your calendar.

Come early and hear some of the most talented high-school age a capella singers in our community when the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble sings at 7pm.

Artist Websites

Tetzlaff Trio »
Christian Tetzlaff »

The Tetzlaff Trio play an excerpt of the 2nd movement of Schubert's 2nd Piano Trio

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“Whatever they play, you want to hear it.”

- The New York Times
Invitation to the Dance Photo
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Invitation to the Dance

Sunday, February 21, 2016, 3:00 PM

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Program

"Invitation to the Dance"

LUIGI BOCCHERINI Guitar Quintet in D Major, G. 448
MAURICE RAVEL La valse, for Two Pianos
JOHANN STRAUSS, arr. Arnold Schoenberg Emperor Waltzes
MANUEL DE FALLA 7 Canciones populares españoles for Voice and Guitar
DARIUS MILHAUD Scaramouche, Op.165b for Two Pianos

PLAYERS
Anna Lim, Violin; Demi Fang ‘17, Violin; Jessica Thompson, Viola; Susannah Chapman, Cello; Laura Oltman, Guitar;  Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Francine Kay, Piano; Paul von Autenried ‘16, Piano; Min-Joo Yi ‘16, Piano; Rochelle Ellis, Soprano





 

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About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students

Igor Levit, Piano Photo
Igor Levit, Piano Photo
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Igor Levit, Piano

Thursday, February 4, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Partita No. 4 in D Major, BWV 828
SCHUBERT Moments musicaux, Op. 94, D. 780
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 17 in D Minor, Op. 31, No. 2
PROKOFIEV Sonata No. 7 in B-flat Major, Op. 83

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About the Artist

Paderewski Memorial Concert

Our spring season kicks off with one of the world’s freshest and most delightful new discoveries: 28-year-old pianist Igor Levit. Virtually unknown until 2014, he has experienced a truly meteoric rise over the last twelve months in the wake of a performance at New York City’s Park Avenue Armory that garnered rave reviews from both The New York Times and The New Yorker. His debut recording for Sony Classical boldly tackled the last three Beethoven sonatas in all their cryptic glory, a rare undertaking for anyone but a venerated old-timer. Alex Ross of The New Yorker said of the recordings, “I was transfixed. Here was playing of technical brilliance, tonal allure, intellectual drive, and an elusive quality that the Germans indicate with the word Innigkeit, or, inwardness.” It is an incredibly exciting time to have him on our stage; by next year he may very well be a household name.

Artist Website

Igor Levit »

Pianist Igor Levit plays Beethoven

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Igor Levit plays an excerpt from Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 31

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“A major new pianist has arrived”

- The New Yorker
David Greilsammer, Piano/Prepared Piano Photo
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David Greilsammer, Piano/Prepared Piano

Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 6:00 PM & 9:00PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

Scarlatti/Cage Sonatas: Journey Between Two Worlds, a one-hour program offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

What do Domenico Scarlatti and John Cage have in common? Quite a lot, according to pianist David Greilsammer. In one unbroken stream, he performs sonatas by the two composers back- to-back, revealing many similarities between the 18th century Italian and the notorious avant- gardist. Don’t be surprised if you start mixing them up halfway through.

Read more about the program in this week's US1 Newspaper.

About the Artist

Known for his fascinating and eclectic programs, conductor and pianist David Greilsammer is recognized as one of today’s most imaginative and audacious artists. Last December, The New York Times selected his album “Mozart In-Between” (Sony Classical) as one of the best recordings of the year. The American newspaper had already awarded his previous album, “Baroque Conversations” among the best albums of 2012, and his New York recital was selected as one of the most interesting musical events of the year.

Born in Jerusalem, David Greilsammer studied at The Juilliard School with Yoheved Kaplinsky, in addition to working with pianist Richard Goode. After making his New York Lincoln Center debut, he went on to becoming “Young Musician of the Year” at the French Music Awards.

Known as a unique interpreter of both baroque and contemporary music, David Greilsammer is also celebrated for his Mozart performances. In 2008, he performed in Paris all of Mozart’s piano Sonatas in a one-day “marathon” and in recent years, he has recorded various albums devoted to the composer. Last season, he played and conducted the complete cycle of Mozart’s twenty-seven piano concertos in Geneva.

Since 2013, David Greilsammer is “Artist in Residence” both at the Saint-Etienne Opera in France and the Meitar Ensemble in Tel Aviv.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artist. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with Mr. Greilsammer.

Artist Website

David Greilsammer »

Pianist David Greilsammer previews his groundbreaking project combining works of Scarlatti and Cage

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Greilsammer plays Scarlatti Sonata in B Minor

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“Mr. Greilsammer is a standout musician who has it in him to challenge, inform and delight audiences”

- The New York Times
Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar Photo
Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar Photo
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Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar

Thursday, November 19, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“AROUND THE WORLD,” an eclectic mix of music from the duo’s acclaimed CD linking Asia, Europe and the Americas, from the award-winning recording on the Warner Classics Label

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About the Artist

A star flautist only comes around once or twice in a generation—and it’s fair to say that this generation’s strongest candidate is Swiss-born Emmanuel Pahud. He sits principal flute in the Berlin Philharmonic and as a soloist has delved into every corner of the repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Prepare to discover a new side of the instrument, and trace Pahud’s dynamics as they range from warm, resonant lows to brilliant, bell-like highs. He joins guitarist Christian Rivet to bring us a program based on their new recording “Around the World,” which charts a worldwide musical course through the lens of folk-inspired composers Elliott Carter, Béla Bartók, and others. It’s a rich and varied collection of pieces, brought to life by an artist with “perhaps the most appealing sound since that of the young James Galway.” (The Washington Post)

Artist Website

Emmanuel Pahud »

Emmanuel Pahud and Christian Rivet play "Around the World"

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Emmanuel Pahud and Christian Rivet play from The History of Tango off their award-winning recording "Around the World."

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“...the nearest thing we've had to a star flautist since James Galway.”

- The Guardian (London)
Isabelle Faust, Violin Photo
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Isabelle Faust, Violin

Monday, November 16, 2015, 7:00 PM Princeton University Chapel

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Program

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
The Complete Sonatas and Partitas, BWV 1001-1006

Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001
Partita No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002
Sonata No. 2 in A Minor, BWV 1003

—Extended Intermission—

Partita No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006
Sonata No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1005
Partita No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004
 

Please note the running time of this concert is a little over three hours with one extended intermission

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About the Artist

Written over the course of twenty years in the early 1700s, Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin have undergone three centuries of dogged reinvention, rediscovery, and reinterpretation. They are required at every conservatory audition, they are recorded by every major violinist, and they are generally considered an essay on the instrument’s expressive and technical capabilities. How, after all these years, can we still find so many nooks and crannies in this cryptic and beautiful cycle? Violinist Isabelle Faust, whose playing is characterized by “passion, grit and electricity” (The New York Times), is perhaps best known for her probing renditions of Bach. She visits Princeton with a very special performance of all six Sonatas and Partitas. In the spirit of “Performances Up Close” this concert will take place in the round at the Princeton University Chapel staged and lit dramatically to reflect the mood and inspiration of the music’s spiritual origins. Prepare to hear Bach’s beloved language with fresh ears. Please note that the Princeton University Chapel will be seated and configured for this special event, so that every person can see and hear the artist up close.  This means that tickets to this event will be limited to no more than 500 seats.

Artist Website

Isabelle Faust »

Isabelle Faust Plays Bach

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Isabelle Faust plays the Gavotte from Bach Partita No. 3

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“Faust has a magnificent grasp of this music. Hear her if you can!”

- Gramophone Magazine
Arcanto String Quartet Photo
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Arcanto String Quartet

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Selections from “The Art of the Fugue,” BWV 1080 (Contrapunctus 1; Contrapunctus 2; Contrapunctus 9. a 4, alla Duodecima)
SCHUMANN Quartet in A Minor, Op. 41 No. 1
SMETANA Quartet No. 1 in E Minor “From My Life”

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About the Artist

Antje Weithaas, violin  • Daniel Sepec, violin • Tabea Zimmermann, viola • Jean-Guihen Queyras, cello

Our fall season continues to drop a spotlight on the string quartet as we welcome our third, pan-European phenoms the Arcanto Quartet. Formed in 2002 by four of Europe’s most high-profile chamber players, they found immediate chemistry; from day one it was clear that this would not be just another exciting but fleeting supergroup. And indeed, though all four artists have maintained rigorous schedules of touring and recording as soloists, when everyone joins forces the Arcanto is nothing short of dazzling. London’s The Telegraph puts it succinctly: “Freshness, close rapport, finesse, and a blend of eloquence and vitality have been hallmarks of its style ever since its debut.” This is a rare opportunity to catch them on a U.S. tour, which includes Carnegie Hall and a small handful of major cities along with their Princeton debut. Be certain to listen carefully to the famous viola solo in the opening of Smetana’s Quartet in E Minor “From My Life,” performed by Tabea Zimmermann, who is regularly cited as the world’s greatest living violist.

Artist Websites

Arcanto String Quartet »
Tabea Zimmermann »

Arcanto Quartet plays the Second Movement of Brahms Quartet No. 1

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“...one of the most stiumulating and enjoyable ensembles to listen to, no matter what it is playing.”

- The Telegraph (London)
Meet the Music: My Brother Franz Schubert Photo
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Meet the Music: My Brother Franz Schubert

Saturday, November 7, 2015, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Ferdinand was a bad composer, and he stole music from Franz in order to pass his school exam. He confessed and was forgiven by Franz. In this fun version of the true story, Ferdinand tries desperately to compose a good accompaniment to the “Trout” melody, but Franz comes up with a better one. This concert is offered for kids ages 6-12 and features the music of Franz Schubert played by musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

“MY BROTHER FRANZ SCHUBERT”

featuring

Gretchen am Spinnrade for Voice and Piano, Op. 2, D. 118
Die Forelle (“The Trout”) for Voice and Piano, Op. 32, D. 550
a movement from Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 114, D. 667 “Trout”
a movement from Piano Trio No. 2 in E-flat Major, Op. 100, D. 929
An die musik (“To Music”) for Voice and Piano, Op. 88, D. 547
 

Musicians:

BRUCE ADOLPHE, Ferdinand Schubert
DAVID GROSSMAN, Double Bass
CHRISTOPHER HERBERT, Baritone
MARK HOLLOWAY, Viola
DANE JOHANSEN, Cello
KRISTIN LEE, Violin
YEKWON SUNWOO, Piano

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Artist Website

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »

Meet Franz Schubert at Richardson Auditorium

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Calidore String Quartet Photo
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Calidore String Quartet

Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Composer's Last Words," Part One - a one hour concert offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

MOZART String Quartet in D Major, K. 575
MENDELSSOHN String Quartet F Minor, Op. 80

About the Artist

If you heard the Calidore Quartet on opening night of our mainstage series collaborating with the Emerson Quartet, here’s a great opportunity to get to know them in a different context. They put together a program of the last quartets written by beloved composers Mendelssohn and Mozart before their untimely deaths.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the artists.

Artist Website

Calidore String Quartet »

Calidore String Quartet plays Beethoven

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Calidore Quartet plays the third movement of Haydn's "Emperor" Quartet

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“The Calidores have all the components to make them a first-rate quartet — four strong individuals, a common goal to bring the music to life and to the audience, and at the same time being very respectful of the composers’ wishes in regard to the score”

- Philip Setzer, Violinist of the Emerson String Quartet
Voices out of the Storm Photo
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Voices out of the Storm

Sunday, October 18, 2015, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Music from the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp

GIDEON KLEIN String Trio
VIKTOR ULLMAN The Lay of the Love and Death of Cornet Christoph Rilke for Piano & Speaker
HANS KRÁSA Tanec for String Trio
ZIKMUND SCHUL Chassidic Dances for Viola and Cello
PAVEL HAAS A Study for Strings

 

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About the Artist

Anna Lim, Violin; Junah Chung, Viola; Alberto Parrini, Cello; Jack Hill, Double Bass; Margaret Kampmeier, Piano; Martha Elliott, Narrator; Michael Pratt, Conductor, plus these supremely talented Princeton students:

Carolyn Chen ’16, Violin; Jessie Chen ’16, Violin; Sam Choi ’19, Violin; Samantha Cody ’17, Violin; Magdalena Collum, ‘18, Violin; Jeffrey Kuan ’18, Violin; Jackie Levine ’16, Violin; Tabitha Oh ’18, Violin; Kristin Qian ’18, Violin; Daniel Wood ’18, Violin; Ingrid Yen ’16, Violin; Tess Jacobson ’19, Viola; Nathan Wong ’18, Viola; Amy Zhang ’19, Viola; Kiwoon Baeg ‘16, Cello; Eli Chang ’16, Cello; Spencer Shen ’16, Cello; Chris Perron ‘17, Bass

Pavel Haas String Quartet Photo
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Pavel Haas String Quartet

Thursday, October 15, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MARTINU Quartet No. 3, H. 183
DVORÁK Quartet No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 34
BEETHOVEN Quartet No. 8 in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2 “Razumovsky”

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About the Artist

Veronika Jarůšková, Violin • Marek Zwiebel, Violin • Pavel Nikl, Viola • Peter Jarůšek, Cello

One of the most exciting developments in chamber music over the last ten years has been the emergence of the Czech Republic-based Pavel Haas Quartet. They have come to be known as the foremost arbiters of their homeland’s rich Romantic-era repertoire, with acclaimed recordings of the great quartets by Czech natives Dvorák, Smetana, Janácek, Martinu, and of course Pavel Haas himself. Time and again, critics have noted their nearly orchestral sound, which fills concert halls with its tremendous intensity and has already earned them Gramophone’s Record of the Year award three times in their young career. London’s The Sunday Times says, “Their account of [Dvorák’s] ‘American’ Quartet belongs alongside the greatest performances on disc”—quite extraordinary, for such a well-worn and recorded piece of music. They visit Princeton for the first time with a few gems from this repertoire, followed by Beethoven’s titan Quartet Op. 59, No. 2 “Razumovsky.”

Artist Website

Pavel Haas String Quartet »

Pavel Haas Quarett plays Smetana

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Pavel Hass Quartet plays an excerpt from Dvorak's "American" Quartet. The Sunday Times of London said this recording "belongs alongside the greatest performances on disc."

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“The world's most exciting string quartet? Well, they suit the tagline better than most. Above all, they play with passion.”

- The Times (London)
Gallicantus, Renaissance vocal ensemble Gabriel Crouch, Director Photo
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Gallicantus, Renaissance vocal ensemble Gabriel Crouch, Director

Sunday, October 11, 2015, 2:00 PM & 4:30 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Songs of the Sibyl," a one-hour program presented in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium.

The ancient Greek prophetesses known collectively as ‘The Sibyls’ were recorded in writing from the 5th Century BC - but from the 2nd century AD, a process of judicious redaction and expansion enabled early Christians to use the Sibylline prophecies as a companion document to the Old Testament. The revised texts, though they retained some of the original mystic and apocalyptic flavor, were largely concerned with a coming Messiah, and as a result they played a significant role in some early Catholic liturgies. By the 16th Century, the 'Song of the Sibyl' was traditionally heard all over Europe on Christmas Eve, but its use was discredited by the Council of Trent (1545-1563) and the tradition now remains only in a few corners of the Iberian Peninsula. The only complete setting of the twelve Sibylline prophecies in existence was composed by Orlandus Lassus (1532-94). His Prophetiae Sibyllarum has achieved notoriety through its intense and dark chromaticism (though it was the first major work of his career, composed in around 1555, it is among his most harmonically adventurous and startling) and through the fact that, with the discredit attributed to the prophecies at precisely the time of its composition there are no other Sibylline settings to compare it with. It is, certainly in terms of its text, and arguably its harmonic language too, a quite unique work.

Our very own Gabriel Crouch (Director of Princeton's Glee Club) and his renowned Renaissance vocal ensemble Gallicantus bring these words to life in a program of the complete setting by Lassus paired with works by the celebrated “Sibyl of the Rhine” Hildegard von BIngen, alongside new works by Princeton professors Dan Trueman and Dmitri Tymoczko.

About the Artist

Literally meaning "rooster song" or "cock crow," Gallicantus takes its name from the term used in monastic antiquity for the office held just before dawn: a ceremony which evokes the renewal of life offered by the coming day. With members drawn from such renowned English vocal ensembles as Tenebrae (whom Princeton audiences heard several seasons ago), The Tallis Scholars and King's Singers, Gallicantus are as meticulous about providing context and insight for audiences as they are about crafting interpretation of the music they love. Their two sold out performance last year on our season proved this is an enesemble worth hearing.  Listen to them but a few minutes and you will find yourself believing in the higher power.  Of Music.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the artists.

Artist Website

Gallicantus »

Philippe de Monte Motets Book V: Voce mea ad Dominum clamavi

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“Everything Gallicantus touches seems to turn to gold.”

- Early Music Today
Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet Photo
Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet Photo
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Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet

Thursday, September 24, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 76, No. 4 “Sunrise”
SHOSTAKOVICH Quartet No. 10, Op. 118
MENDELSSOHN Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20

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About the Artist

Charles S. Robinson Memorial Concert

In 1976, four students at The Juilliard School discovered a shared interest in string quartet repertoire and decided to start making music together. Nearly four decades later, the Emerson Quartet has made unparalleled contributions to the genre, amassing thirty recordings, nine Grammys, and a rare induction into the Classical Music Hall of Fame. They graced our stage last season with an unforgettable program, energized by the lineup’s new addition of cellist Paul Watkins (formerly of the The Nash Ensemble of London). And now, it is a pleasure to invite them back to kick off our 2015-16 season. The evening will culminate with the youthful, exuberant, and beloved Octet in E-flat Major by Felix Mendelssohn, written just a few months after the composer’s sixteenth birthday— no better way to herald opening night! Joining the Emersons onstage for the Octet will be their current protégés, the quickly rising Calidore String Quartet, lauded as “four highly intelligent, deeply sensitive virtuosos.” (Strings Magazine) It will be an intergenerational meeting of the minds, and we can’t wait to see what will happen.

Artist Websites

Emerson String Quartet »
Calidore String Quartet »

Emerson Quartet is joined by new cellist Paul Watkins

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The Emerson String Quartet Plays the Second Movement of Ravel's String Quartet: Assez vif

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“Let’s make one thing perfectly clear: The “old” Emerson String Quartet never phoned one in. But this new group complemented their customary power, finesse and unanimity with a fresh, palpable vigor, and it was electrifying.”

- The New York Times
Anthony Roth Costanzo, Countertenor & Bryan Wagorn, Piano Photo
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Anthony Roth Costanzo, Countertenor & Bryan Wagorn, Piano

Thursday, April 30, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert discussion moderated by Professor Wendy Heller with Michael Pratt, Andrew Moravcsik and Steven Mackey at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Songs & Arias by Duparc, Britten, Liszt, Mozart, Handel, Gershwin, plus the world premiere of a work written for this occasion by Steven Mackey with special guest artists SO Percussion.

About the Artist

The delightfully funny and engaging Princeton graduate Anthony Roth Costanzo will change your idea of countertenors when he returns to his alma mater to take the stage, now “a bona-fide star,” according to The New Yorker. While the major part of his repertoire consists of works written for castrati, Costanzo prefers to evoke Frankie Valle, the Bee Gees, Michael Jackson, Mick Jagger and Prince as singers who employed their upper registers to no small advantage. Costanzo says he simply has “a more reinforced, operatic style than they did.” Rather than confine himself to the standard countertenor fare, Costanzo revels in branching out. “A recital provides a rare opportunity for me to explore my musical and artistic self,” he tells us. “Unlike opera, art songs are less often written for a specific voice type, and thus are commonly transposed to fit a particular singer’s tessitura. Duparc’s lush and ardent filigree, Liszt’s romantic and nuanced melodies— these are joys I don’t get to explore on the opera stage, but ones that have a unique resonance in the countertenor voice and to me personally. What I have learned in my opera career translates in fascinating and wonderful ways to the romantic repertoire, and even to songs by Gershwin.” Singing “I Got Rhythm,” this versatile artist might just tap dance his way into your heart.

PLUS THERE'S MORE...

MASTERCLASS WITH ANTHONY ROTH COSTANZO
Monday, May 4, 2015 at 7:00PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

Select Princeton singers work with Anthony Roth Costanzo.  Free and open to the public.

Artist Website

Anthony Roth Costanzo »

VIDEO PREVIEW: Anthony Roth Costanzo

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“a bona-fide star”

- The New Yorker
Australian Chamber Orchestra,  Richard Tognetti, Conductor with Charles Neidich, Clarinet Photo
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Australian Chamber Orchestra,  Richard Tognetti, Conductor with Charles Neidich, Clarinet

Thursday, April 16, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7pm by Ellipses Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PROKOFIEV/BARSHAI Visions fugitives
MOZART Clarinet Concerto in A Major, K. 622
JONNY GREENWOOD Water (Princeton Premiere)
MOZART Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550

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About the Artist

Hip, refreshing and brilliant, the Australian Chamber Orchestra has been called “a badass classical band” by Time Out New York while The Washington Post hails them for combining “the energy and vibe of a rock band with the ability of a crack classical chamber group.” Their instruments alone represent an all-star lineup, including the legendary 1743 Carrodus Guarneri del Gesù violin; the Carrodus made by del Gesù, called one of the four or five of the finest violins in the world; a 1759 Guadagnini; a 1728/9 Strad; and a 1729 Giuseppe Guarneri filius Andreæ cello. But it’s the way these virtuosi play their extraordinary instruments that makes them a Dream Team. At Princeton they’ll premiere Water by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood. Following his latest international tour with legendary band Radiohead, Greenwood joined the ACO in the studio writing this new work. One of the world’s greatest guitarists, Greenwood also writes great orchestral music. He composed the award-winning film score for There Will Be Blood, was composer-in-residence with the BBC Concert Orchestra and has written scores for films The Master, Norwegian Wood and We Need to Talk About Kevin.The Orchestra will also team up with clarinetist Charles Neidich (who recently stepped in for Martin Fröst who was forced to cancel due to a shoulder injury).  In the words of The New Yorker, Charles Neidich "is an artist of uncommon merit -- a master of his instrument and, beyond that, an interpreter who keeps listeners hanging on each phrase.”  To read more about the new work by Jonny Greenwood, click here.

Artist Websites

Australian Chamber Orchestra »
Charles Neidich »

ACO Artistic Director Richard Tognetti and Radiohead Guitarist Jonny Greenwood talk about Greenwood's new piece, "Water."

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Australian Chamber Orchestra and Martin Frost play Klezmer Dances

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“a badass classical band”

- The Washington Post
Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
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Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano

Thursday, March 26, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Sonata in A Major, Op. 162, D. 574 (“Grand Duo”)
SCHUBERT Rondo in B Minor, Op. 70, D. 895 (“Rondo Brilliant”)
BACH (arr: Busoni): Chorale Prelude “Nun komm' der Heiden Heiland” BWV 659 for Solo Piano
TELEMANN Fantasie No. 4 in D Major TWV 40:17 for Solo Violin
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96

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About the Artist

The mop-top musician to emerge from Liverpool most recently wasn’t born until after the breakup of those other four famous Liverpudlians. Pianist Paul Lewis didn’t take up piano until age 12 and learned about music at a local library, where he immersed himself in the recordings of the great Alfred Brendel, with whom he would later study. Ironically, it was Brendel who, after hearing Georgian-born Lisa Batiashvili perform in 2001, wrote, “Every note both sang and spoke... proving once more that great violinists reveal themselves at an early age.” Batiashvili has observed, “There is nothing more exciting than attending a live performance and feeling every moment with the artists... I am constantly striving to find new ways of expressing what’s within the music, and this helps to keep things fresh, new and exciting....” And Lewis, who is winning worldwide acclaim as an interpreter of Schubert, says, “People wonder whether there’s something valedictory about [Schubert’s] last sonata, but for me there’s almost a sense of acceptance… there’s not so much of a struggle anymore, just a sense of accepting your fate.”

Artist Websites

Lisa Batiashvili »
Paul Lewis »

Lisa Batiashvili plays Schubert

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Violinists Lisa Batiashvili plays Romance No. 1 by Clara Schumann with pianist Alice Sara Ott

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Meet The Music: Inspector Pulse Pops A String Photo
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Meet The Music: Inspector Pulse Pops A String

Saturday, March 21, 2015, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

It is only when the wacky Inspector breaks a piano string that he learns that pianos even have strings inside. Who knew that? How can we make so much music with just stretched strings? Inspector Pulse gets answers to a string of questions when he is visited by a string quartet.

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About the Artist

Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she “meets the music” in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The popular concerts for kids ages 6-12 and their families return, after a first season of two sold-out performances. Featuring musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

Artist Websites

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »
Bruce Adolphe »

Meet the Music at Richardson Auditorium on March 21, 2015 at 1pm.

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“Pierrot’s Stage,” Richardson Chamber Players Photo
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“Pierrot’s Stage,” Richardson Chamber Players

Sunday, March 1, 2015, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BIBER Battalia in D Major
SCHOENBERG Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 21

PLAYERS:

Martha Elliott, Soprano; Anna Lim, Violin; Alberto Parrini, Cello; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute; Edmund Niemann; Piano;  Wendy Young, Harpsichord; John Ferrari, Percussion; Michael Pratt, Conductor

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About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was co-founded by Nathan A. Randall and Michael J. Pratt during the 1994-1995 Centennial season of Princeton University Concerts.  The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented students.  The repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard.

Marc-André Hamelin, Piano Photo
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Marc-André Hamelin, Piano

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Ruth Ochs at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Paderewski Memorial Concert

MOZART Sonata No. 18 in D Major, K. 576
HAMELIN Pavane Variée (2014)
DEBUSSY Images, Book Two
SCHUBERT Sonata No. 21 in B-flat Major, D. 960

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About the Artist

“I am not aware of a greater marriage of intellect and sensuality,” Canadian-born Marc-André Hamelin once said of the music of Claude Debussy. Fittingly, the pianist himself has been praised in The New Yorker for “monstrously brilliant technique and his questing, deepthinking approach;” Alex Ross also called Hamelin’s hands “among the wonders of the musical world.” You might expect one of the great pianists of our time to work his way through all the time-honored piano concertos, but Hamelin seems more interested in dark horses than warhorses, and delights in discovering works by such little-known composers as Georgy Catoire, Xaver Scharwenka and Sophie Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatté. In Princeton, he will play works spanning four centuries by composers of somewhat greater renown: Mozart, Schubert, Debussy… and Hamelin (2013). Responding to the annoyance of having a cellphone interrupt a recital by pianist Hamelin, composer Hamelin of the devilish sense of humor penned the Valse Irritation d’aprés Nokia—so bring your own sense of humor along to this magnificent artist’s recital.

Artist Website

Marc-André Hamelin »

Marc-André Hamelin plays Mozart

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Marc-André Hamelin plays the 1st Movement of Haydn Piano Sonata in E MInor, HOB XVI:47

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“among the wonders of the musical world.”

- Alex Ross for "The New Yorker"
Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano Photo
Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano Photo
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Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, February 18, 2015, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

CHARPENTIER Suite in D Minor
DEBUSSY String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 10
JAKE HEGGIE Camille Claudel: Into the Fire (Princeton premiere)

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About the Artist

Fast on the heels of the enormous success of Joyce DiDonato’s first recital appearance on our series this season, and following the end of the Brentano String Quartet’s residency at Princeton, we are pleased to offer a way to hear both of these great artists again…together! This Dream Team will join forces for the Princeton premiere of Camille Claudel: Into the Fire, a song cycle for Mezzo-soprano and String Quartet written by composer Jake Heggie with lyrics by Gene Scheer Heggie. The work focuses on the tragic demise of the genius sculptor and lover of Rodin, Camille Claudel. Claudel’s career ended when she was confined to a mental hospital for the last three decades of her life. Her involuntary incarceration, which many considered unnecessary, almost doomed her to obscurity. The piece, which received its world premiere in San Francisco, was called “a heartbreaker,” by The San Francisco Chronicle, and was described as “a score of deep, squishy sentimentality and enormous beauty.” When asked what attracted him to Camille Claudel, composer Jake Heggie said, “I am consistently drawn to stories about transformative quests for identity. Claudel’s story is of a woman struggling to be known on her own, and on her own terms, for the genius that she was given. It touches on elements of feminism, on the art world, on judgments of the public versus the internal life of the artist, and on mental illness. In the end, Camille [Claudel] does triumph, because her sculptures love and dance and sing.”

Artist Websites

Brentano String Quartet »
Joyce DiDonato »

“Joyce sings and the world is suddenly brighter.”

- Composer Jake Heggie
Chicago Symphony Winds Photo
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Chicago Symphony Winds

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MOZART Serenade No. 12 for Winds in C Minor, K. 388 (“Nacht Musique”)
MOZART Serenade No. 10 for 12 Winds and String Bass in B-flat Major, K. 361 (“Gran Partita”)

PLAYERS:

Elizabeth Tiscione, Xiomara Mass, oboes
John Bruce Yeh, Teresa Reilly, clarinets
David Tuttle, Susan Warner, basset horns
Miles Maner, Drew Pattison, bassoons
Daniel Gingrich, James Smelser, Oto Carrillo, David Griffin, french horns
Daniel Armstrong, double bass

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About the Artist

Thirteen magnificent musicians—wind players of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra—are coming to play one of Mozart’s most sublime works, rarely performed at this supreme level of artistry. Here’s how Amadeus playwright Peter Shaffer depicted composer Antonio Salieri recalling his reaction the first time he heard the Gran Partita: “Suddenly… an oboe, a single note, hanging there unwavering, till a clarinet took over and sweetened it into a phrase of such delight! … This was a music I’d never heard. Filled with such longing, such unfulfillable longing, it had me trembling. It seemed to me that I was hearing a voice of God.”

OBOES, CLARINETS, HORNS, BASSOONS...WE WANT YOU!

Following the concert will be a jaw-dropping opportunity for amateur musicians of all ages and levels to join the CSO musicians on stage to sight-read Mozart Wind Serenade in E-flat Major.  We are pleased to offer another Late Night Chamber Jam! This time for wind players - specifically oboes, clarinets, horns and bassoons.  All ages and levels are welcome to participate. Tickets to the CSO Winds concert are not required to participate in the Late Night Chamber Jam, but reservations are required for the reading.  To sign up, click here.

The winds of the Berlin Philharmonic play an excerpt of the 3rd movement of Mozart's Gran Partita

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“It seemed to me that I was hearing a voice of God.”

- Amadeus" playwright Peter Shaffer depicting Antonio Salieri recalling his reaction the first time he heard the "Gran Partita
Stefan Jackiw, Violin & Anna Polonsky, Piano Photo
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Stefan Jackiw, Violin & Anna Polonsky, Piano

Thursday, February 5, 2015, 8:00 PM Musical preview featuring Opus 21, a chamber music collective of Princeton students, at 7pm, free to ticketholders

PLEASE NOTE: This concert is a substitution for the originally scheduled Isabelle Faust and Alexander Melnikov who were forced to cancel due to illness
Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

Maurice Ravel Tzigane

Witold Lutoslawski Partita

Kaija Saariaho Nocturne in memory of W. Lutoslawski

César Franck Sonata in A Major

In their Washington, DC debut at the Kennedy Center just last year, the Washington Post described the performance of the Lutoslawski, which Princeton audiences will be treated to next week, as the following:  “The real heart of the evening (part of Washington Performing Arts Society’s “Virtuoso Series”) came in Witold Lutoslawski’s “Partita for Violin and Piano” from 1984, a work so explosive that the word “volcanic” barely covers it. Darkly lyrical, wildly atmospheric, it built to such white-hot intensity in the central Largo (aptly described by Jackiw as “an apocalyptic meditation”) that you thought the violin would erupt in flames. Jackiw threw himself into the music as if nothing else mattered and turned in the kind of playing you always hope for at a concert but rarely hear. It was an absolutely spectacular performance, run through with urgent and often unsettling beauty.”

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Jackiw is no stranger to capturing the limelight on short notice.  In recent years, he has replaced cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and violinists Lisa Batiashvili and Pam Frank, catapulting his career onto an international stage.  Hailed for “talent that’s off the scale” (Washington Post), he has appeared as soloist with the Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, New York, Philadelphia, and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras, among others, and he has collaborated with such renowned conductors as Marin Alsop, Andrew Davis, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Mikhail Pletnev, and Yuri Temirkanov. His solo performance of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra at Australia’s Sydney Opera House in March was seen live on YouTube by more than 30 million people worldwide. On disc, Jackiw is garnering acclaim for his debut album of the Brahms Violin Sonatas with pianist Max Levinson (Sony). Fanfare magazine proclaimed, “Jackiw is fantastic. …This is now the recording of Brahms’s violin sonatas to have.”   Jackiw made his European debut age 14 to great critical acclaim, playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra. His sensational performance was featured on the front page of London’s Times, and the Strad reported, “A 14-year-old violinist took the London music world by storm.” Now, at age 30, he is well on his way to joining ranks with the world’s great violinists.  In 2014 his performances were mentioned among the top ten classical music events of the year in The Boston Globe and the Chicago Sun Times.  Born in 1985 to physicist parents of Korean and German descent, Stefan Jackiw began playing the violin at the age of four. His teachers have included Zinaida Gilels, Michèle Auclair, and Donald Weilerstein. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University, as well as an Artist Diploma from the New England Conservatory. In 2002, the young artist was awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

Anna Polonsky, Jackiw’s regular duo partner, was heard this season on our series as a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s “Meet the Music” concert for families. She made her solo piano debut at the age of seven at the Special Central Music School in Moscow, Russia. She emigrated to the United States in 1990, and attended high school at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan. She received her Bachelor of Music diploma from The Curtis Institute of Music, where she worked with the renowned pianist Peter Serkin, and continued her studies with Jerome Lowenthal, earning her Master's Degree from The Juilliard School. In addition to performing, she serves on the piano faculty of Vassar College. She has been a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Two program.

Artist Websites

Stefan Jackiw »
Anna Polonsky »

“Talent that's off the scale”

- The Washington Post