Princeton University Concerts

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Murray Perahia, Piano Photo
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Murray Perahia, Piano

Thursday, May 11, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Tickets to this event are SOLD OUT.  Obstructed view tickets may be purchased at the Frist Campus Center Box Office by calling 609-258-9220. They are open 11:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Program

Paderewski Memorial Concert

Program TBA

About the Artist

Pianist Murray Perahia first graced our stage in the spring of 1976, shortly after winning the Leeds Piano Competition and earning his first record deal. Forty years later, he returns to Princeton as one of the most in uential pianists of our time, having performed with every leading orchestra to universal acclaim, all while enjoying the friendship of the likes of composer Benjamin Britten and pianist Vladimir Horowitz. The Chicago Tribune declares, “His commanding insights are more than enough to breathe freshness and distinction into works we've heard many times before, but seldom played at this inspired level.” But while his playing has been celebrated for its meticulous, jaw-dropping clarity, he  nds inspiration in the unpredictable: “What really counts for me,” Perahia reveals, “is spontaneity. I never give the same performance twice.” We are honored to have him close our season with one of his trademark unrepeatable evenings.

Artist Website

Murray Perahia »

“His place among the great pianists of our time is not disputed.”

- The Guardian (London)
Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano Photo
Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano Photo
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Pekka Kuusisto, Violin and Nico Muhly, Piano

Sunday, April 30, 2017, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Single tickets for this event will go on sale on March 1, 2017.

Program

“Breaking Ground” – music by J.S. Bach, Philip Glass, Arvo Pärt, Nico Muhly, with Finnish folksongs

About the Artist

According to The Telegraph (London), Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto “surely has the most personal sound of any classical violinist now alive.” Composer-pianist Nico Muhly is one of the most celebrated and sought-after classical composers of the last decade and is the youngest composer ever commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera. These ground-breaking classical musicians join forces for a hallmark program of their own curating that combines the music of J.S. Bach with contemporary fare.

Artist Websites

Pekka Kuusisto »
Nico Muhly »

Violinist Pekka Kuusisto plays and sings a popular finnish folksong

More videos at discover and listen »

“Kuusisto and Muhly brought a sense of such intimacy and spontaneity...more concerts should feel this way.”

- The Washington Post
Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin Photo
Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin Photo
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Pamela Frank, Violin and Christian Tetzlaff, Violin

Thursday, April 20, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event TBD at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Single Tickets:  A $50  B $40  C $25 - save 10% off single tickets by adding this concert to a Make Your Own Series.  Students with valid ID, $10.  To buy tickets, click on the linke below or call the Frist Campus Center Box Office.  They are open Monday - Friday, 11AM-5PM.

Program

Violin duos by JEAN-MARIE LECLAIR, SERGEI PROKOFIEV, BÉLA BÁRTÓK, and JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

About the Artist

Two of the most revered violinists of our generation come together for a special evening of rarely performed works for two violins. In 2000, Pamela Frank received the Avery Fisher Prize—perhaps the highest honor given to American instrumentalists. Teaching at Curtis and Peabody, her public concerts have been precious few in recent years. She has now returned to the concert stage, bringing her “big, rich sound ... that breathes with purpose” (Philadelphia Inquirer). The other half of the duo is none other than Christian Tetzlaff, who is becoming a staple at Richardson Auditorium after his extraordinary solo debut in 2012 and the sold-out follow-up with his eponymous trio last season. A violin duo is perhaps the most intimate and conversational of all the chamber music forms, and these two masters—who have been friends for decades—invite us into the discussion.

Artist Website

Christian Tetzlaff »

“Projection is one- third intellectual, one-third your soul, and one- third what you do with the right hand to spin those thoughts and feelings into sound. Christian is like a math genius of the bow.”

- Violinist Pamela Frank on her childhood friend Christian Tetzlaff
Béla Fleck, Banjo and Abigail Washburn, Banjo/Voice Photo
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Béla Fleck, Banjo and Abigail Washburn, Banjo/Voice

Thursday, April 13, 2017, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

Single ticket prices:  all seats $40, $15 for students with valid ID.  Save 10% by making your own series.  To buy tickets, click on the linke below or call the Frist Campus Center Box Office.  They are open Monday - Friday, 11AM-5PM.

About the Artist

Béla Fleck is one of the most innovative and in uential banjo players in the history of the instrument, often combining classical harmony with an e ortless Scruggs style. He was at the helm of such landmark groups as the Flecktones and the Africa Project, and recently wrote his first Banjo Concerto, commissioned and premiered by the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. With 15 Grammys and 30 nominations, he has been nominated in more musical categories than any other artist in Grammy history! The collaboration with his wife and fellow banjoist, Abigail Washburn, is one of the most magical in his catalogue, with the purity of two-part counterpoint in full force guided by Abigail’s soulful singing and claw-hammer style. In a season anchored by timeworn masterworks here at Princeton, Fleck and Washburn offer a slightly different perspective to the mix, drawing from the great vernacular music of Appalachia.

Artist Website

Béla Fleck »

Fleck & Washburn on CBS Sunday Morning

More videos at discover and listen »

“Their harmonic lines were as close-knit as their relationship, and there was warmth and wit woven through their performances, smiles and patter. But it’s their expressive range— in Washburn’s nostalgia-tinged voice and Fleck’s insouciant solos—that made the evening so compelling. If anyone can convince a skeptical world of the beauty of the banjo, it is this pair.”

- The Guardian (London)
Something Old, Something New Photo
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Something Old, Something New

Sunday, April 9, 2017, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

SINGLE TICKETS: $15, $5 for students with valid ID.  To buy tickets, click on the linke below or call the Frist Campus Center Box Office.  They are open Monday - Friday, 11AM-5PM.

Program

"Something Old, Something New" including a new work by Princeton composer/faculty Juri Seo

AUGUSTA READ THOMAS Scat for Oboe, Violin, Viola, Cello, and Piano
MARCO UCCELLINI Selections from Ozio
ANTONIO VIVALDI Cello Sonata No. 3 in A Minor
ARVO PÄRT Two Pieces for Violin, Cello and Piano
JURI SEO Rondeaux for Violin, Viola, Cello, Oboe/English Horn, Trombone, and Piano (World Premiere)

Musicians:

Wendy Young, Harpsichord
Margaret Kampmeier, Piano/Harpsichord
Mark Broschinsky, Trombone/Sackbut
Matthew Sullivan, Oboe
Anna Lim, Violin
Nancy Wilson, Violin
Jessica Thompson, VIola
Alistair MacRae, Cello
Calvin Wentling '18, Countertenor
 

About the Artist

Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Benjamin Bagby, Anglo-Saxon Harp and Voice Photo
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Benjamin Bagby, Anglo-Saxon Harp and Voice

Thursday, March 30, 2017, 6:00 PM

Ticket Info

THIS CONCERT IS NOW SOLD OUT.  ANY RETURNED TICKETS MAY BE AVAILABLE AT RICHARDSON AUDITORIUM THE NIGHT OF THE CONCERT STARTING 5:00PM. (please note that Benjamin Bagby is also performing this program at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania on March 24, 2017 - just about an hour away. Tickets are still avialable for that performance.  For more information, click here.)

$25 General, $10 Students

 

Program

“Beowulf” – the epic book in a multi-media performance with Bagby playing the Anglo-Saxon harp and singing/reciting the Beowulf story. Bagby will be joined by Experiential Designer and Adobe Creative Resident  Craig Winslow who will bring the colorful characters and narrative to life through the use of projection.

About the Artist

Watch as Bagby summons music’s magical capacity to travel across time and bring narrative to life. Accompanied by a six-string lyre, the riveting adventures of the legendary warrior Beowulf in his quest to defeat the horrific monster Grendel will be recited, chanted, and sung in the original Old English in which this illustrious 11th-century masterpiece was written. This production, critically acclaimed for almost two decades, is a rare chance to encounter one of the most popular texts in western literature as it was originally performed.

Artist Website

Benjamin Bagby »

“a double tour de force of scholarly excavation and artistic dynamism.”

- San Francisco Chronicle
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, March 16, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 7 in F Major, Op. 59. No. 1
String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130, with Op. 133 “Grosse Fuge”

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Our Beethoven Series closes with three celebrated works from the master’s middle and late periods. After this season, the Takács Quartet will no longer perform the Beethoven quartet cycle in its entirety, so this performance marks a final farewell bow for the legendary interpreters, who “play the Beethoven repertoire better than any quartet past or present” (The Cleveland Plain Dealer). The evening begins with the great “Razumovsky” Quartet Op. 59, No. 1. The piece marks Beethoven’s first foray into chamber music’s more expansive forms, setting the stage for later explorations. After intermission, they bring us the Quartet Op. 130, including the original last movement, the notorious "Grosse Fuge," which was so poorly received (“an indecipherable horror”) upon its premiere that Beethoven hastily replaced it with a more digestible Finale. But the bold and dense fugue is now considered a groundbreaking achievement—Stravinsky famously called it “an absolutely contemporary piece of music that will be contemporary forever.”

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“The consummate artistry of the Takács is simply breathtaking.”

- The Guardian (London)
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with the quartet, hosted by Scott Burnham Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 6 in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6
String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135
String Quartet No. 9 in C Major, Op. 59, No. 3

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here is one you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  Monday, March 13, 2017 at 7pm in Taplin Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.  Please note that this class was originally scheduled for Tuesday, March 14 but was changed due to the impending weather.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“No other composer has posed so many questions about the form and emotional content of a string quartet, and come up with so many different answers. The need we feel to revisit our interpretations of the quartets is inspired in part by the spirit of exploration that runs through them.”

- From Beethoven For A Later Age: Living with the String Quartets by Edward Dusinberre (First Violinist of the Takács String Quartet)
Meet The Music: Albert & Wolfgang Photo
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Meet The Music: Albert & Wolfgang

Saturday, March 11, 2017, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

The musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and host Bruce Adolphe return on Pi Day Weekend with a program that honors Princeton’s own Albert Einstein.

BRUCE ADOLPHE, Albert Einstein
LLEWELLYN SANCHEZ-WERNER, Piano
DANBI UM, Violin
MATTHEW LIPMAN, Viola
NICHOLAS CANELLAKIS, Cello

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Meet the Music!  Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she encounters chamber music in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.

A group of physics students await their teacher on their first day of class, and who should appear but Albert Einstein! Einstein once said, “Mozart’s music is so pure and beautiful that I see it as a reflection of the inner beauty of the universe.” In his day, Einstein performed Mozart sonatas on the violin and played chamber music with professional musicians all over the world. Join us for an adventure with Einstein and Mozart! Featuring the music of Mozart and Adolphe.

Artist Website

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »

VIDEO PREVIEW: Click to Meet the Music at Richardson Auditorium on March 11, 2017

More videos at discover and listen »
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MINDFULNESS & MUSIC

Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 12:30 PM Live Music Meditation with SO Percussion and led by Matthew Weiner Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

Join us for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and our Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence SO Percussion  Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary.  This is part of our Mindfulness with Music Program.This event is FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

Hagen String Quartet Photo
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Hagen String Quartet

Thursday, March 2, 2017, 8:00 PM Musical Preview featuring siblings Sarah and Solene Le Van '18 at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

SCHUBERT Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, D. 87
SHOSTAKOVICH Quartet No. 12 in D-flat Major, Op. 133
DVOŘÁK Quartet No. 14 in A-flat Major, Op. 105

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Over a three-decade career, the Hagen Quartet have become an unmatched presence on the European chamber music scene, touring and collaborating at a whirlwind pace while releasing forty- five CDs for Deutsche Grammophon. They formed in Salzburg in 1981 and have remained Austria-based, with Vienna’s Die Presse heralding them as “the highest art of existence.” We were very fortunate to host them on an infrequent U.S. tour in 2012, and we are doubly fortunate to invite them back in 2017! The group—which includes three siblings—will be performing on the four Stradivarius instruments previously owned by the Paganini, Cleveland, and Tokyo Quartets. Their program is a sample of chamber music at its  nest and most exciting, from a great quartet whose unusual interpretations are always full of surprises.

PLUS THERE'S MORE....PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS

in addition to the concert, 2nd violinist of the Hagen Quartet, Rainer Schmidt will coach Princeton student quartets.  The coaching takes place on March 2 at 10AM in Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall and is free open to the public.

“Nothing as it seems. And it is certainly not as we thought we knew it. That is the Hagen Quartet’s message.”

- HAMBURGER ABENDBLATT
England’s Green Photo
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England’s Green

Sunday, February 19, 2017, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

"England's Green and Pleasant Land"

RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Merciless Beauty, 3 Rondels for 2 Violins, Cello, and Voice
FRANK BRIDGE Novelletten, H. 44
GERALD FINZI Five Bagatelles, Op. 23 for Clarinet and Piano
JOHN MCCABE Three Folk Songs for Clarinet, Piano, and Voice
BENJAMIN BRITTEN Folk Songs for Voice and Piano
EDWARD ELGAR Serenade for String Orchestra, Op. 20
 

About the Artist

MUSICIANS:

Rochelle Ellis, Soprano
David Kellett, Tenor
Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet
Anna Lim, Violin
Eric Wyrick, Violin
Emma Powell '17, Violin
Danielle Farina, Viola
Alberto Parrini, Cello
Elizabeth DiFelice Piano
Michael Pratt, Conductor
 


Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Colin Currie, Percussion Photo
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Colin Currie, Percussion

Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

“Realismos Mágicos” – solo percussion music by Per Norgaard, Toshio Hosokawa, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis and Rolf Wallin's eleven short pieces based on Gabriel García Márquez short stories.  Currie will be joined by actor Michael Dean Morgan who read excerpts from Garcia Márquez' stories as part of the presentation.

COMPLETE PROGRAM:

ELLIOTT CARTER Figment V for Solo Marimba
PER NØRGÅRD "Fire over Water” from I-Ching for Solo Percussion
TOSHIO HOSOKAWA Remniscence for Solo Marimba
BRUNO MANTOVANI Moi, jeu... for Solo Marimba
KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN Vibra-Elufa for Solo Vibraphone
ROLF WALLIN  Realismos Mágicos for Solo Marimba

About the Artist

One of the most internationally sought-after solo percussionists of our time, Colin Currie will perform feats of percussion acrobatics, bouncing seamlessly between instruments with his hallmark “cool headed brilliance” (The Daily Telegraph, London). Having premiered works by most of today’s leading composers, all of Colin Currie’s performances sparkle with novelty and spontaneity. With the seemingly in nite range of sounds conjured by his instruments, Currie will show music at its most primal, liberating, and unexpected.

Artist Websites

Colin Currie »
Michael Dean Morgan »

“Surely the world’s best and most daring percussionist”

- The Spectator (London)
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putnins, Artistic Director Photo
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Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Kaspars Putnins, Artistic Director

Thursday, February 9, 2017, 8:00 PM Princeton University Chapel

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

“Northern Land & Spirit,” choral works by ARVO PÄRT, PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY, VELJO TORMIS and JEAN SIBELIUS

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Our spring season kicks off with the beloved Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir in their first visit to the Northeast since selling out Carnegie Hall in June 2014. The music of their homeland, in all its glory and gravitas, anchors their mission and repertoire, but the 25-voice ensemble brings equal might to everything from Gregorian chant to the present day. The Washington Post declares, “the choir’s performances inspire a transporting awe,” while Newsday praises their “music-making of sublime and self-abnegating mastery.” They have been nominated for no less than fourteen Grammy’s across a range of styles, and they visit Princeton with a program of favorites from Northern Europe: Tchaikovsky, Tormis, Sibelius, and the uncrowned king of Estonian music, Arvo Pärt, whose vocal music is written exclusively for the EPCC. Our beautiful and resounding University Chapel will be the perfect space to revel in the power of the human voice.

Artist Website

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir »

“Pure, powerful and unabashedly spiritual.”

- The Washington Post
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LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 10:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

CALLING ALL AMATEUR STRING PLAYERS:  WE WANT YOU!

Following the performance of the Takács String Quartet on January 19, 2017, at approximately 10pm,  amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to join the Takács Quartet for a community sight-reading of Beethoven String Quartet Op. 18, No. 4.  This annual event coincides with the Beethoven String Quartet Cycle played by the Takács Quartet throughtout the current season. Audience is also invited to stay after the performances to enjoy the sight reading session.  It is always a positive celebration of our collective love of music. Players do not need to have concert tickets to participate in the Late Night Chamber Jam, but reservations are required. SIGN UP NOW>

Enjoy excerpts from the 2015 Late Night Chamber Jam, held annually.

More videos at discover and listen »
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 3 in D Major, Op. 18, No. 3
String Quartet No. 8 in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2
String Quartet No. 12 in E-flat Major, Op. 127

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

Please note: THIS CONCERT WILL BE FOLLOWED BY THE LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM.  For more information, or to sign up, click here.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“The Takacs Quartet might play this repertoire (Beethoven) better than any other quartet in the past or present.”

- The Cleveland Plain Dealer
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with Scott Burnham and members of the quartet Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 5 in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5
String Quartet No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 18, No. 4
String Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of empires. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

WAIT! THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, with 2 classes remaining on January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Open Rehearsal:  time and place tbd.  Check back for more details.

3. Late Night Chamber Jam: Amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to sight read a Beethoven String Quartet with the Takács String Quartet.  LEARN MORE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“This is chamber music of overwhelming intensity - simply the best I've ever heard.”

- The Guardian (London)
Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, November 17, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

This concert has happened. Tickets are no longer available.

Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1
String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 74 “Harp”
String Quartet No. 14 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 131

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

We are absolutely thrilled and honored to be hosting the Takács Quartet for six concerts this season as they perform the Beethoven string quartet cycle in its entirety. Hailed as “chamber music playing of overwhelming intensity ... simply the best I’ve seen in concert” (The Guardian, London), their 2006 box set of the sixteen quartets has become the high-water mark for these masterworks. We have included two of their programs in our Concert Classics Series, of which this special evening is the first. The program proceeds chronologically, beginning with Beethoven’s Quartet Op. 18, No. 1, influenced by Haydn and deeply rooted in the 18th-century quartet tradition. His Quartet Op. 74 follows, nicknamed “Harp” for the arpeggiating pizzicato figure in the first movement. After intermission, we are treated to the tremendous, seven-movement Op. 131. Upon hearing a performance of the quartet for the first time, Schubert remarked, “After this, what is left for us to write?”

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, taking place on November 16; January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought as a series, or individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Mindfulness & Music: Join us on November 16 at 12:30pm for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet. Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary. READ MORE HERE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takács String Quartet »

“The Takács might play Beethoven better than any other quartet in the past or the present.”

- The Cleveland Plain Dealer
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MINDFULNESS & MUSIC

Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 12:30 PM Live Music Meditation with the Takács String Quartet and led by Matthew Weiner Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Program

Join us for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet.  Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary.  This is part of our Mindfulneeds with Music Program, and is special event in celebration of our Beethoven String Quartet Cycle this year.
This event is FREE AND OPEN TO ALL.

Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 8:00 PM Post-concert talk back with the quartet, hosted by Scott Burnham Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
String Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2
String Quartet No. 11 in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso”
String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 with Finale

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

When the world renowned Takács Quartet completed their recording project of all sixteen Beethoven string quartets in 2006, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “this survey stands as the most richly expressive modern account of this titanic cycle.” And indeed, their interpretations have stood as the gold standard for Beethoven, from the whimsical and strident early Op. 18 quartets to the cryptic and monumental Grosse Fuge. This concert season, the Takács have chosen Princeton as one of three venues in the United States where they will perform the entire cycle, across six concerts in our Richardson Auditorium, for the last time together.

In a brief thirty-year career, Ludwig van Beethoven journeyed further— expressively, conceptually, and psychologically—than any other composer before or since. His artistic odyssey is considered one of the supreme accomplishments in human history, compared to the building of cathedrals or the rise of democracy. The concept of absolute music—music for its own sake, not “about” anything, or in service of the church—crystallized in his wake. And while his nine symphonies arguably contained many of the grandest and most boundary-breaking moments in his catalogue, the sixteen quartets are where he explored within and made his most personal statements. Collectively, the cycle reads like a blueprint for his artistic development.

Over these six performances with the Takács Quartet, we are treated to the ultimate thrill of seeing this blueprint, even more relevant in 2016 than on the day of Beethoven’s death in 1827, unfold before our eyes. Join us for all or as many as you can and be a part of history in the music-making right here on Nassau Street.

THERE'S MORE...

The special nature of these concerts has inspired us to offer a number of activities that will allow you to deepen your engagement with these incredible works.  Here are two you should know about being offered in this week of concerts:

1. Princeton Adult School Class:  "Exploring the Beethoven String Quartets" will be taught by Scott Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  This is a 3-part class, taking place on November 16; January 17 and March 14.  Classes can be bought as a series, or individually. For more information, visit the Princeton Adult School website.

2. Mindfulness & Music: Join us on November 16 at 12:30pm for a Live Music Meditation with Matthew Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, and the Takács String Quartet. Come for a half-hour guided meditation, followed by group conversation with the musicians about the experience of listening to music mindfully.  No prior experience necessary. READ MORE HERE>

For a complete schedule of the the Beethoven Cycle concerts and activities, click here.

Artist Website

Takacs String Quartet »

“Beethoven’s 16 string quartets were written over a 27-year span of his life, and they range from the wide-eyed energy and variety of his first six quartets to the enigmatic and existential worlds of his final five quartets. It is impossible to think of a more compelling window onto Beethoven, onto the genre of the string quartet, or even onto the entire multifarious pageant of chamber music in the modern West.”

- Professor Scott Burnham on the Beethoven String Quartets
Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds Photo
Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds Photo
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Baby Got Bach: Wonderful Winds

Saturday, November 5, 2016, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"WONDERFUL WINDS" — Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she encounters chamber music in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Back by popular demand, pianist Orli Shaham will introduce pre-school-aged kids to the joy of live classical music played, in an interactive concert especially created for children age 3 to 6 and their families. You'll meet all the instruments in the woodwind family and see how to make music just by breathing.  Internationally renowned concert pianist Orli Shaham is your host, along with special guest woodwind quintet, Windsync in their Princeton debut. Aaron Copland's Hoedown will set your toes tapping and you'll be riveted by the classic musical tale Peter and the Wolf.  And, of course, plenty of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, and more.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Orli Shaham is an internationally renowned pianist.  She travels all over the world giving concerts and many of today's most important composers have written pieces for her, including Princeton's own Steven Mackey who has written a piece for her. Orli created the Baby Got Bach series in 2010 series because she thought that there weren’t enough opportunities for pre-school aged kids to hear really great live classical music.  Baby Got Bach is recognized by parents, media and the music community as a significant force in music education and entertainment for pre-schoolers.  The program is in-residence at the 92nd Street Y in New York City, and has been cited in New York Magazine’s “Best of New York” list. Orli has also taken Baby Got Programs on tour all over the country.

Special guests Windsync have been hailed by the Houston Chronicle as “revolutionary chamber musicians.”  They are internationally recognized for dramatic and engaging interpretations of classical music.  Gold Medalist in the National Fischoff Chamber Music Competition and winner of the Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh International Competition, this dynamic ensemble focuses on building a connection with audiences through adventurous programming and charismatic stage presence. These five virtuoso players perform exclusively from memory and specialize in creative concerts that inspire and entertain audiences of all ages.

Artist Websites

Orli Shaham »
WindySync »
Sergei Babayan, Piano and Daniil Trifonov, Piano Photo
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Sergei Babayan, Piano and Daniil Trifonov, Piano

Thursday, October 27, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUMANN Andante and Variations in B-flat Major, Op. 46
SCHUBERT Fantasie in F Minor for Piano Four Hands, D. 940
BRAHMS Hungarian Dances WoO. 1
RACHMANINOFF Two Suites for Two Pianos

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About the Artist

At the age of 25, Daniil Trifonov has already established himself as one of the finest living pianists. “A fully formed virtuoso with an artistic soul to match his mighty fingers” (Seattle Times), he has appeared with all of the “Big Five” U.S. orchestras, swept First Prize and Audience Prize at both the Rubinstein and Tchaikovsky Competitions, and given a solo recital at Carnegie Hall to uproarious acclaim. Amid his touring schedule, though, he manages to continue study at The Cleveland Institute of Music, under the tutelage of prominent Armenian pianist Sergei Babayan. In an extremely special evening, this student and teacher come together to perform a program of 19th-century piano duos. It will be the  rst two-piano program on our series since 1982, and an unusual opportunity to witness such an intimate relationship enacted onstage—the cherished passing of music from one generation to the next will be right before our eyes.

 

Join us for more...
PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS

Daniil Trifonov will coach student members of the Princeton Pianists Ensemble on Friday, October 28, 2016 at 9:30AM in Richardson Auditorium.  This event is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

 

Artist Websites

Daniil Trifonov »
Sergei Babayan »

pianists Sergei Babayan and Daniil Trifonov play Rachmaninoff Suite for Two Pianos

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Pianists Sergei Babayan and Daniil Trifonov play Rachmaninoff Suite for Two Pianost Live at teh Verbier Festival

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“(Trifonov) has everything and more...technically incredible...his touch—he has tenderness and also the demonic element. I never heard anything like that.”

- Pianist Martha Argerich
Melting Pot Photo
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Melting Pot

Sunday, October 16, 2016, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Melting Pot" - Music with Folk Influences from the New World

Three American Folk Songs for brass quintet arr. Andrew Rinfleisch
CHARLES IVES  Piano Trio
Modern Ballads for brass quintet and percussion
WILLIAM BOLCOM Select Cabaret Songs for Voice & Piano
PAQUITO D’RIVERA Four Pieces for Brass Quintet and Percussion

MUSICIANS:
Sarah Pelletier, Soprano; Geoffrey Burleson, Piano; Anna Lim, Violin; Susannah Chapman, Cello; Wayne DuMaine, Trumpet; Henry Whitaker '17, Trumpet; Chris Komer, Horn; Benjamin Herrington, Trombone; Brian Brown, Tuba; John Ferrari, Percussion
 

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About the Artist

Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The artistic direction of the group rotates. This seasons’ programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of cellist Alistair MacRae, mezzo-soprano Sarah Pelletier, and trombonist Benjamin Herrington. Michael Pratt is a Founding Director and Advisor.

Belcea String Quartet Photo
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Belcea String Quartet

Thursday, October 13, 2016, 8:00 PM Musical Preview at 7PM by alums of the Royal College of Music/Princeton University Exchange program, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Quartet No. 12 in C Minor, D. 703 “Quartettsatz”
BRAHMS Quartet in A Minor, Op. 51, No. 2
SCHUBERT Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, D. 810 “Death and the Maiden”

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About the Artist

Twenty years ago, a group of young string players at London’s Royal College of Music came together around a collective passion for the string quartet repertoire and its endless capacity for reinterpretation. A few years later, their rendering of the Debussy and Ravel string quartets won the Gramophone Award for Best Debut Recording, and the rest is history. The Guardian (London) describes the intensity of a Belcea performance well: “[they] seize the music’s energy, shocking us out of our seats with every fortissimo.” And in addition to their eternally youthful energy, they are deeply committed to mentoring emerging groups and fostering a landscape of young quartet players—the Belcea Quartet Trust is an ambitious new project that offers intensive coaching sessions for ensembles on the rise. In their Princeton debut (and a rare visit to the United States), they will perform works by two great melodicists, Schubert and Brahms. Prepare to drive home with tunes running through your head!

Artist Website

Belcea String Quartet »

Belcea Quartet plays Brahms live at Carnegie Hall

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Belcea String Quartet plays the Scherzo from Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" Quartet

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“a spiritual depth and expressive urgency that leaves you eager to hear more.”

- The New York Times
Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano Photo
Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano Photo
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Jamie Barton, Mezzo-soprano and James Baillieu, Piano

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Lindsey Christiansen from Westminster Choir College at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

JOAQUIN TURINA Songs from Homenaje a Lope de Vega
JOHANNES BRAHMS  Select songs
ANTONIN DVORAK  Cigánské melodie, Op. 55
CHARLES IVES  Select songs
JEAN SIBELIUS  Select songs

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About the Artist

A young mezzo from Georgia is currently taking the world by storm, and her name is Jamie Barton. Sporting a nose ring and an ebullient smile, Barton summons a tone that has earned her comparisons to many of the mid-20th century greats—and indeed, the magnificent Marilyn Horne called a recent recital “one of the greatest I’ve ever heard.” Just this year she won the prestigious Richard Tucker Award, an honor conferred annually on a rising American star that places her in the lineage of Renée Fleming and Joyce DiDonato. But as her voice becomes a staple in large opera houses, we are thrilled to invite her into the more immediate and personal setting of Richardson Auditorium to ring in opening night of Princeton University Concerts’ 2016-2017 mainstage series! She brings us a program of late Romantic lieder, a wonderful showcase for her richly detailed instrument which the Los Angeles Times calls “the darkly creamy lager that poured forth from altos of yore.”

PLUS, THERE'S MORE...

Jamie Barton will appear on the PERFORMERS AS TEACHERS series
Friday, October 7, 2016 at 12:30PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall
Come peek behind the scenes as Jamie Barton coaches talented Princeton students.  This event is free and open to the public.
 

Artist Website

Jamie Barton »

Jamie Barton Takes 5 with Opera News

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Mezzo-Soprano Jamie Barton sings Donizetti's O mon Ferand at the 2012 Richard Tucker Gala

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“She is a great artist, no question, with an imperturbable steadiness of tone, and a nobility of utterance that invites comparison not so much with her contemporaries as with mid-20th century greats.”

- The Guardian (London)
Augustin Hadelich, Violin and Pablo Sáinz Villegas, Guitar Photo
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Augustin Hadelich, Violin and Pablo Sáinz Villegas, Guitar

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“Histoire du Tango” – works by Astor Piazzolla, Manuel De Falla, Eugène Ysaÿe, Roland Dyens, and a world premiere by composer Lorenzo Palomo.  Lighting designer Kate Ashton will create an atmosphere that reinforces the character and emotional message of each work on this multimedia program

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Making their Princeton debut, Grammy-award winning violin phenomenon Augustin Hadelich and Spanish guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas bring highlights from their popular album, Histoire du Tango, to Princeton University Concerts.

With audience seated around them directly on the stage, the artists will trace the history of Argentina's national dance in Astor Piazzolla's title track and stir up folk, gypsy and flamenco dances. Transforming the stage into an Argentine nightclub with the help of light-designer Kate Ashton, the duo will present two performances, each an hour long. Seating is very limited. Audience will have a chance to interact with the artists following the performance.

Artist Websites

Augustin Hadelich »
Pablo Sáinz-Villegas »

Hadelich and Villegas talk about their CD "Histoire du Tango"

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“Hadelich’s playing combined impressive technical command with plush, rich-textured sound. And with magisterial poise and serene control...”

- The New York Times
Matthias Goerne, Baritone with Alexander Schmalcz, Piano Photo
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Matthias Goerne, Baritone with Alexander Schmalcz, Piano

Thursday, April 28, 2016, 8:00 PM Preview Event featuring the winners of the 2016 Creative Reactions Contest at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Die Schöne Mullerin, D. 795

Please note that this concert will be performed without intermission.  The running length of the concert will be an estimated 75 minutes.  There will be no late seating so plan to get to the concert early.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Tim Smith of The Baltimore Sun once wrote, “If you are very, very lucky, you get to hear a performance every now and then that is so sublime in execution, so profound in expressive realization that it will have a place with you for the rest of your life. I felt I had one of those experiences when baritone Matthias Goerne sang [Schubert]. I felt privileged to witness it.” And lo and behold, in our own intimate Richardson Auditorium, we close our Concert Classics series with a touch of the transcendent as Goerne comes and performs the entire Die Schöne Mullerin song cycle by Schubert. Goerne’s voice is typically heard in giant rooms like Carnegie or Disney Hall, but for lieder, and especially the deeply personal lieder of Schubert at his peak, Richardson is a much more immediate environment to experience this music as it was created and intended. He has been called the heir of the late Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, singing the repertoire that made him a star.

Artist Website

Matthias Goerne »

Matthias Goerne sings Das Wandern from Die Schoene Mullerin

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“...one of the most compelling and insightful performances of Schubert I have ever heard.”

- The New York Times
Julien Labro, Accordion/Bandoneon/Accordina  Gregg Kallor, Piano Photo
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Julien Labro, Accordion/Bandoneon/Accordina Gregg Kallor, Piano

Thursday, April 14, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

The Big Squeeze,  two one-hour concerts offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

Accordion virtuoso Julien Labro can do it all. Equally at home performing traditional Latin music in performing arts centers, free jazz in clubs, and hooks on techno tracks, Labro is a true Renaissance man. At 6pm, he brings us  a program of accordion music from around the world, featuring works by Bernhard Molique, Astor Piazzolla, Isaac Albéniz, Gabriel Fauré, Fernando Otero and Labro himself.  At 9pm, Labro and Kallor are joined by Jorge Roeder, bass and Richie Barshay, drums for a jazz nightcap.

Take the trip in just 60 minutes and experience a variety of cultures through the musical styles of Julien Labro as he performs the accordion, bandoneon and accordina, three relatively unknown instruments in North America, and shows how they have been incorporated into various genres of music across different regions around the world. Travel to France with the accordina and see how jazz musicians use this unique instrument to express their creativity, emotions and, of course, romance. This journey will also feature a stop in Argentina, where the melancholic yet passionate musical tones of the bandoneon inspired Astor Piazzolla to develop Nuevo Tango, a genre of music once so controversial that he was banned from the country. Last but not least, the accordion will take you throughout Europe, South America, and North America as Julien shows how it has been adopted by each region into the Classical, Jazz and Pop genres.

These informal concerts will feature music introduced by the artist. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with Mr. Labro.

ENCORE!

In between the two “Big Squeeze” programs, squeeze in some art! The Princeton University Art Museum will salute the concerts’ South American repertoire with two special, 30-minute tours of its Art of the Ancient Americas galleries. Free and open to all, Encore presents the chance to extend the Performance Up Close to a “culture up close,” whether as a coda after the 6PM concert, a prelude to the 9PM concert, or an interlude for those attending both events. Two tours start at 7:30pm and 8:00pm.  Refreshments will be served.

About the Artist

Heralded as “the next accordion star” by Howard Reich of The Chicago Tribune, Julien Labro has established himself as one of the foremost accordion and bandoneón players in both the classical and jazz genres. Deemed to be “a triple threat: brilliant technician, poetic melodist and cunning arranger,” his artistry, virtuosity, and creativity as a musician, composer and arranger have earned him international acclaim and continue to astonish audiences worldwide. Picking up the accordion at the tender age of 9, French-born Labro was influenced early on by traditional folk music and the melodic, lyrical quality of the French chanson. Upon discovering the music of jazz legends like Charlie Parker and Miles Davis, he quickly became inspired by the originality, freedom, creativity, and the endless possibilities in their musical language.

Artist Website

Julien Labro »

Accordian Player Julien Labro talks about his instruments

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Julien Labro plays Astor Piazzolla with the Spektral Quartet

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“Brilliant accordionist”

- Chicago Tribune
Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
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Paul Lewis, Piano

Thursday, April 7, 2016, 8:00 PM Preview event at 7pm featuring Ellipses Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

SCHUBERT Sonata No. 9 in B Major, D. 575
BRAHMS
Three Intermezzi, Op. 117
BRAHMS Four Ballades, Op. 10
LISZT Après une lecture du Dante: Fantasia quasi Sonata (“Dante” Sonata)

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Last season at Princeton, violinist Lisa Batiashvili and pianist Paul Lewis treated us to an extraordinary program of works by Schubert and Beethoven. It was the first time Lewis, a concert hall staple and veteran interpreter of the central European canon, was on our stage, and we were unsatisfied with only one concert. Hence, he returns this year to perform alone in an evening of mid-Romantic masterworks, including Schubert’s great Sonata in B Major. This music finds him at the absolute top of his game, and arguably at the top of anyone’s game. Of his recordings of the complete Beethoven sonatas, Anthony Tommasini writes in The New York Times, “if I had to recommend a single complete set, I would suggest Mr. Lewis’s distinguished recordings.” And, of his live performance of the last three Schubert sonatas in Boston in 2013, The Boston Globe said it was “the most audacious, most edifying, and most fulfilling musical event of the season.” These recommendations pretty much speak for themselves—spend your Thursday night hearing some of the best Romantic piano playing in the world.

Come early to check out Ellipses, Princeton's Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community.

Plus there's more...

Paul Lewis will give a FREE MASTERCLASS when he coaches Princeton piano students.
Friday, April 8, 2016 at 10AM-12PM
Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Free and open to the public.
 

Artist Website

Pianist Paul Lewis plays Schubert

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Paul Lewis plays Bach live in Richardson Auditorium

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“Here is fresh, intelligent yet daring playing alert to the flights of wildness in the music.”

- The New York Times
Parisian Spring Photo
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Parisian Spring

Sunday, April 3, 2016, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Parisian Spring"

CLAUDE DEBUSSY Trio for Flute, Viola, Harp
MAURICE RAVEL Chansons madécasses for Mezzo-soprano, Flute and Cello
JACQUES IBERT 2 Stèles orientées for Soprano and Flute
MANUEL DE FALLA Psyché for Soprano, Flute, Harp, Violin, Viola, Cello
DARIUS MILHAUD 3 Little Symphonies

About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students

Escher String Quartet Photo
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Escher String Quartet

Thursday, March 24, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Composer’s Last Words," Part Two - a one-hour concert offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

BRITTEN String Quartet No. 3
SCHUBERT String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor, “Death and the Maiden”

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the quartet.

CALLING ALL AMATEUR STRING PLAYERS:  WE WANT YOU!

Following the 9pm performance, amateur string players of all ages and levels are invited to join the Escher Quartet for a community sight-reading of a string quartet.  It's another LATE NIGHT CHAMBER JAM. Click here for more information. 

About the Artist

Adam Barnett-Hart, Violin • Aaron Boyd, Violin • Pierre Lapointe, Viola • Brook Speltz, Cello

NYC-based Escher Quartet is quickly on the rise, serving as artists-in-residence at The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, where last season they presented a critically acclaimed 3-concert series featuring the quartets of Benjamin Britten. They have received acclaim for its profound musical insight and rare tonal beauty. Championed by the Emerson String Quartet, the group was on the BBC New Generation Artists scheme from 2010-2012, giving debuts at both the Wigmore Hall and the BBC Proms at Cadogan Hall. In its home town of New York.  In 2013, the Quartet became one of the very few chamber ensembles to be awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

Artist Website

Escher String Quartet »

Escher Quartet plays Beethoven

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Escher Quartet plays the Scherzo from Mendelssohn Quartet No. 4

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“...one of the top young quartets before the public today...This is a group to watch.”

- The Washington Post
Baby Got Bach: Principally Percussion Photo
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Baby Got Bach: Principally Percussion

Sunday, March 20, 2016, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

NEW THIS SEASON — Building on the success of “Meet the Music,” we are excited to now presents it’s first concert geared towards children ages 3-6 and their families. Hosted by world-renowned pianist Orli ShahamBaby Got Bach: “Principally Percussion,” will feature Princeton’s esteemed Ensemble-in-Residence Sō Percussion and American Ballet Theatre dancer Rachel Richardson. This interactive concert will explore all of the sounds a piano and percussion can make through the music of J.S. Bach, Steve Reich, John Cage, and Princeton's own Steven Mackey. Kids are invited to stay afterward to come on stage and jam with the musicians!

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Orli Shaham is an internationally renowned pianist.  She travels all over the world giving concerts and many of today's most important composers have written pieces for her, including Princeton's own Steven Mackey who has written a piece for her that will be heard in its Princeton debut at this concert. Orli created the Baby Got Bach series in 2010 series because she thought that there weren’t enough opportunities for pre-school aged kids to hear really great live classical music.  Baby Got Bach is recognized by parents, media and the music community as a significant force in music education and entertainment for pre-schoolers.  The program is in-residence at the 92nd Street Y in New York City, and has been cited in New York Magazine’s “Best of New York” list. Orli has also taken Baby Got Programs on tour all over the country.  This concert respresents Baby Got Bach’s Princeton University Concerts debut.

Guest artists So Percussion, are Princeton's Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence. Sō Percussion has redefined the scope of the modern percussion ensemble.  Their repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as David Lang, and Princeton's Steven Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Worden, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

Rachel Richardson joined the Amercian Ballet Theatre as an apprentice in January 2015 and became a member of the corps de ballet in June 2015.  Her repertoire includes Columbine and one of the Nutcracker's Sisters in The Nutcracker, as well as roles in all of the Company's full-length ballets.

Artist Websites

Orli Shaham »
SO Percussion »

Orli Shaham plays Steve Reich's Clapping Music

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Ébène String Quartet Photo
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Ébène String Quartet

Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

Two one-hour concerts, offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

Back by popular demand are the four members of the astounding Ébène Quartet. Come for the gavotte, but stay for the lindy-hop: these remarkable chameleons will begin the evening with an all-French program from the traditional string quartet literature of Debussy and Dutilleux at 6pm, but will then transform Richardson stage into the Cotton Club with pieces from their collection of jazz favorites at 9pm.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

Pierre Colombet, Violin • Gabriel Le Magadure, Violin • Adrien Boisseau, Viola • Raphaël Merlin, Cello

“Someday My Prince Will Come” says the Disney song. He will indeed, on March 9, and he’s bringing three other princes with him. They are the virtuosos of the Ébène Quartet, whose concert on our season last year was unforgettable.  They are four Frenchmen known for moving seamlessly and with élan between classical and jazz (“Jazzical”?), enriching performances of each with the magic of the other. “A string quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band,” lauded The New York Times, and in praising their recent Carnegie Hall performance of a Schumann Quartet, The Times said the finale “took on a decidedly jazzy swing.” The Boston Globe hails the Quartet’s non-classical fare as “exciting and ear-opening.” With one program devoted to classical music and a second one devoted to jazz, you might hear some Miles Davis or, in a nod to a local boy, a moving take on Bruce Springsteen’s Streets of Philadelphia, performed with instrumental majesty and surprisingly princely vocals.

Artist Website

Ébène String Quartet »

Ébène Quartet plays Mendelssohn

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The Ébène Quartet plays Miserlou from Pulp Fiction

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“a string quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band”

- The New York Times
Alexander Melnikov, Piano Photo
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Alexander Melnikov, Piano

Sunday, March 6, 2016, 2:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SHOSTAKOVICH The Complete Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87

Please note: this concert is approximately 3 hours with two 20-minute intermissions

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About the Artist

After Isabelle Faust takes on the Bach Sonatas and Partitas, pianist Alexander Melnikov will tackle a wildly different but equally tremendous cycle: Shostakovich’s complete 24 Preludes and Fugues. Composed at the height of his popularity after the Second World War, these pieces are quintessential Shostakovich: sometimes sarcastic, sometimes wistful, and almost always politically charged. Russian-born Melnikov is one of the only pianists to commit this daunting cycle to recording, and did it in dazzling fashion: his 2010 recording was included in BBC Music Magazine’s list of the “50 Greatest Recordings of All Time.” Another critic reflects on his interpretation: “everything is testament to reflection and skill, yet the pianist is not lecturing, but laughing, dreaming, lamenting and dancing” (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung). Following this stunning critical reception, he makes a rare live appearance at Princeton focusing on these extraordinary pieces from Russia’s most controversial composer.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE REPERTOIRE...

INSIDE THE SHOSTAKOVICH PRELUDES & FUGUES FOR PIANO WITH SIMON MORRISON
a class in collaboration with the Princeton Adult School
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 7-8:30PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

In the lead up to this extraordinary concert, Princeton Professor Simon Morrison, one of the world’s leading experts on Russian and Soviet music, will untangle the mysteries of these pieces and illuminate their importance, giving class members an insider’s knowledge of what to expect from the performance.  This is a rare opportunity to immerse yourself in these rarely heard pieces from Russia’s most controversial composer.

This class is offered through the Princeton Adult School. To sign up, visit thier website or call 609-683-1101.

Class:  $40
Class, plus a concert ticket: $76

Artist Website

Alexander Melnikov »

Alexander Melnikov plays Shostakovich Prelude No. 1. His recoring of the complete Preludes and Fugues was called "one of the 50 greatiest recordings of all time" by BBC Music Magazine.

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“Melnikov reveals a kaleidoscope of colours and moods. An exhilarating experience.”

- BBC Music Magazine
Tetzlaff Trio Photo
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Tetzlaff Trio

Thursday, February 25, 2016, 8:00 PM Musical Preview featring the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUMANN Trio No. 2 in F Major, Op. 80
DVORÁK Trio No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 90, “Dumky”
BRAHMS Trio No. 1 in B Major, Op. 8

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About the Artist

Christian Tetzlaff, Violin  • Tanja Tetzlaff, Cello  •  Lars Vogt, Piano

In the crowded and entangled landscape of violin virtuosi, Christian Tetzlaff is simply one of a kind. Noted for his “anti-lyrical” sound and preference for wide dynamic range over soloistic bombast, he has achieved superstardom over the course of three decades in the public eye. Following a triumphant solo recital two seasons ago on our series, he returns this year with the Tetzlaff Trio, a rare configuration that includes pianist Lars Vogt and cellist (and sister) Tanja Tetzlaff. It will be the first piano trio on our stage in over ten years, and we are celebrating the occasion with a program of absolute treasures—works by Brahms, Schumann and Dvorák that anchor the 19th-century piano trio repertoire. This is not a collection of artists who tour through the states together more than once in a blue moon, so please be sure to put this one on your calendar.

Come early and hear some of the most talented high-school age a capella singers in our community when the Princeton Girlchoir Ensemble sings at 7pm.

Artist Websites

Tetzlaff Trio »
Christian Tetzlaff »

The Tetzlaff Trio play an excerpt of the 2nd movement of Schubert's 2nd Piano Trio

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“Whatever they play, you want to hear it.”

- The New York Times
Invitation to the Dance Photo
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Invitation to the Dance

Sunday, February 21, 2016, 3:00 PM

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Program

"Invitation to the Dance"

LUIGI BOCCHERINI Guitar Quintet in D Major, G. 448
MAURICE RAVEL La valse, for Two Pianos
JOHANN STRAUSS, arr. Arnold Schoenberg Emperor Waltzes
MANUEL DE FALLA 7 Canciones populares españoles for Voice and Guitar
DARIUS MILHAUD Scaramouche, Op.165b for Two Pianos

PLAYERS
Anna Lim, Violin; Demi Fang ‘17, Violin; Jessica Thompson, Viola; Susannah Chapman, Cello; Laura Oltman, Guitar;  Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Francine Kay, Piano; Paul von Autenried ‘16, Piano; Min-Joo Yi ‘16, Piano; Rochelle Ellis, Soprano





 

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About the Artist

Our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students

Igor Levit, Piano Photo
Igor Levit, Piano Photo
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Igor Levit, Piano

Thursday, February 4, 2016, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Partita No. 4 in D Major, BWV 828
SCHUBERT Moments musicaux, Op. 94, D. 780
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 17 in D Minor, Op. 31, No. 2
PROKOFIEV Sonata No. 7 in B-flat Major, Op. 83

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About the Artist

Paderewski Memorial Concert

Our spring season kicks off with one of the world’s freshest and most delightful new discoveries: 28-year-old pianist Igor Levit. Virtually unknown until 2014, he has experienced a truly meteoric rise over the last twelve months in the wake of a performance at New York City’s Park Avenue Armory that garnered rave reviews from both The New York Times and The New Yorker. His debut recording for Sony Classical boldly tackled the last three Beethoven sonatas in all their cryptic glory, a rare undertaking for anyone but a venerated old-timer. Alex Ross of The New Yorker said of the recordings, “I was transfixed. Here was playing of technical brilliance, tonal allure, intellectual drive, and an elusive quality that the Germans indicate with the word Innigkeit, or, inwardness.” It is an incredibly exciting time to have him on our stage; by next year he may very well be a household name.

Artist Website

Igor Levit »

Pianist Igor Levit plays Beethoven

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Igor Levit plays an excerpt from Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 31

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“A major new pianist has arrived”

- The New Yorker
David Greilsammer, Piano/Prepared Piano Photo
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David Greilsammer, Piano/Prepared Piano

Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 6:00 PM & 9:00PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

Scarlatti/Cage Sonatas: Journey Between Two Worlds, a one-hour program offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

What do Domenico Scarlatti and John Cage have in common? Quite a lot, according to pianist David Greilsammer. In one unbroken stream, he performs sonatas by the two composers back- to-back, revealing many similarities between the 18th century Italian and the notorious avant- gardist. Don’t be surprised if you start mixing them up halfway through.

Read more about the program in this week's US1 Newspaper.

About the Artist

Known for his fascinating and eclectic programs, conductor and pianist David Greilsammer is recognized as one of today’s most imaginative and audacious artists. Last December, The New York Times selected his album “Mozart In-Between” (Sony Classical) as one of the best recordings of the year. The American newspaper had already awarded his previous album, “Baroque Conversations” among the best albums of 2012, and his New York recital was selected as one of the most interesting musical events of the year.

Born in Jerusalem, David Greilsammer studied at The Juilliard School with Yoheved Kaplinsky, in addition to working with pianist Richard Goode. After making his New York Lincoln Center debut, he went on to becoming “Young Musician of the Year” at the French Music Awards.

Known as a unique interpreter of both baroque and contemporary music, David Greilsammer is also celebrated for his Mozart performances. In 2008, he performed in Paris all of Mozart’s piano Sonatas in a one-day “marathon” and in recent years, he has recorded various albums devoted to the composer. Last season, he played and conducted the complete cycle of Mozart’s twenty-seven piano concertos in Geneva.

Since 2013, David Greilsammer is “Artist in Residence” both at the Saint-Etienne Opera in France and the Meitar Ensemble in Tel Aviv.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artist. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with Mr. Greilsammer.

Artist Website

David Greilsammer »

Pianist David Greilsammer previews his groundbreaking project combining works of Scarlatti and Cage

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Greilsammer plays Scarlatti Sonata in B Minor

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“Mr. Greilsammer is a standout musician who has it in him to challenge, inform and delight audiences”

- The New York Times
Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar Photo
Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar Photo
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Emmanuel Pahud, Flute & Christian Rivet, Guitar

Thursday, November 19, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

“AROUND THE WORLD,” an eclectic mix of music from the duo’s acclaimed CD linking Asia, Europe and the Americas, from the award-winning recording on the Warner Classics Label

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About the Artist

A star flautist only comes around once or twice in a generation—and it’s fair to say that this generation’s strongest candidate is Swiss-born Emmanuel Pahud. He sits principal flute in the Berlin Philharmonic and as a soloist has delved into every corner of the repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Prepare to discover a new side of the instrument, and trace Pahud’s dynamics as they range from warm, resonant lows to brilliant, bell-like highs. He joins guitarist Christian Rivet to bring us a program based on their new recording “Around the World,” which charts a worldwide musical course through the lens of folk-inspired composers Elliott Carter, Béla Bartók, and others. It’s a rich and varied collection of pieces, brought to life by an artist with “perhaps the most appealing sound since that of the young James Galway.” (The Washington Post)

Artist Website

Emmanuel Pahud »

Emmanuel Pahud and Christian Rivet play "Around the World"

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Emmanuel Pahud and Christian Rivet play from The History of Tango off their award-winning recording "Around the World."

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“...the nearest thing we've had to a star flautist since James Galway.”

- The Guardian (London)
Isabelle Faust, Violin Photo
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Isabelle Faust, Violin

Monday, November 16, 2015, 7:00 PM Princeton University Chapel

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Program

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
The Complete Sonatas and Partitas, BWV 1001-1006

Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001
Partita No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002
Sonata No. 2 in A Minor, BWV 1003

—Extended Intermission—

Partita No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006
Sonata No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1005
Partita No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004
 

Please note the running time of this concert is a little over three hours with one extended intermission

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About the Artist

Written over the course of twenty years in the early 1700s, Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin have undergone three centuries of dogged reinvention, rediscovery, and reinterpretation. They are required at every conservatory audition, they are recorded by every major violinist, and they are generally considered an essay on the instrument’s expressive and technical capabilities. How, after all these years, can we still find so many nooks and crannies in this cryptic and beautiful cycle? Violinist Isabelle Faust, whose playing is characterized by “passion, grit and electricity” (The New York Times), is perhaps best known for her probing renditions of Bach. She visits Princeton with a very special performance of all six Sonatas and Partitas. In the spirit of “Performances Up Close” this concert will take place in the round at the Princeton University Chapel staged and lit dramatically to reflect the mood and inspiration of the music’s spiritual origins. Prepare to hear Bach’s beloved language with fresh ears. Please note that the Princeton University Chapel will be seated and configured for this special event, so that every person can see and hear the artist up close.  This means that tickets to this event will be limited to no more than 500 seats.

Artist Website

Isabelle Faust »

Isabelle Faust Plays Bach

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Isabelle Faust plays the Gavotte from Bach Partita No. 3

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“Faust has a magnificent grasp of this music. Hear her if you can!”

- Gramophone Magazine
Arcanto String Quartet Photo
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Arcanto String Quartet

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Selections from “The Art of the Fugue,” BWV 1080 (Contrapunctus 1; Contrapunctus 2; Contrapunctus 9. a 4, alla Duodecima)
SCHUMANN Quartet in A Minor, Op. 41 No. 1
SMETANA Quartet No. 1 in E Minor “From My Life”

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About the Artist

Antje Weithaas, violin  • Daniel Sepec, violin • Tabea Zimmermann, viola • Jean-Guihen Queyras, cello

Our fall season continues to drop a spotlight on the string quartet as we welcome our third, pan-European phenoms the Arcanto Quartet. Formed in 2002 by four of Europe’s most high-profile chamber players, they found immediate chemistry; from day one it was clear that this would not be just another exciting but fleeting supergroup. And indeed, though all four artists have maintained rigorous schedules of touring and recording as soloists, when everyone joins forces the Arcanto is nothing short of dazzling. London’s The Telegraph puts it succinctly: “Freshness, close rapport, finesse, and a blend of eloquence and vitality have been hallmarks of its style ever since its debut.” This is a rare opportunity to catch them on a U.S. tour, which includes Carnegie Hall and a small handful of major cities along with their Princeton debut. Be certain to listen carefully to the famous viola solo in the opening of Smetana’s Quartet in E Minor “From My Life,” performed by Tabea Zimmermann, who is regularly cited as the world’s greatest living violist.

Artist Websites

Arcanto String Quartet »
Tabea Zimmermann »

Arcanto Quartet plays the Second Movement of Brahms Quartet No. 1

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“...one of the most stiumulating and enjoyable ensembles to listen to, no matter what it is playing.”

- The Telegraph (London)
Meet the Music: My Brother Franz Schubert Photo
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Meet the Music: My Brother Franz Schubert

Saturday, November 7, 2015, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Ferdinand was a bad composer, and he stole music from Franz in order to pass his school exam. He confessed and was forgiven by Franz. In this fun version of the true story, Ferdinand tries desperately to compose a good accompaniment to the “Trout” melody, but Franz comes up with a better one. This concert is offered for kids ages 6-12 and features the music of Franz Schubert played by musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

“MY BROTHER FRANZ SCHUBERT”

featuring

Gretchen am Spinnrade for Voice and Piano, Op. 2, D. 118
Die Forelle (“The Trout”) for Voice and Piano, Op. 32, D. 550
a movement from Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 114, D. 667 “Trout”
a movement from Piano Trio No. 2 in E-flat Major, Op. 100, D. 929
An die musik (“To Music”) for Voice and Piano, Op. 88, D. 547
 

Musicians:

BRUCE ADOLPHE, Ferdinand Schubert
DAVID GROSSMAN, Double Bass
CHRISTOPHER HERBERT, Baritone
MARK HOLLOWAY, Viola
DANE JOHANSEN, Cello
KRISTIN LEE, Violin
YEKWON SUNWOO, Piano

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Artist Website

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »

Meet Franz Schubert at Richardson Auditorium

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Calidore String Quartet Photo
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Calidore String Quartet

Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 6:00 PM & 9:00 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Composer's Last Words," Part One - a one hour concert offered in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium

MOZART String Quartet in D Major, K. 575
MENDELSSOHN String Quartet F Minor, Op. 80

About the Artist

If you heard the Calidore Quartet on opening night of our mainstage series collaborating with the Emerson Quartet, here’s a great opportunity to get to know them in a different context. They put together a program of the last quartets written by beloved composers Mendelssohn and Mozart before their untimely deaths.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the artists.

Artist Website

Calidore String Quartet »

Calidore String Quartet plays Beethoven

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Calidore Quartet plays the third movement of Haydn's "Emperor" Quartet

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“The Calidores have all the components to make them a first-rate quartet — four strong individuals, a common goal to bring the music to life and to the audience, and at the same time being very respectful of the composers’ wishes in regard to the score”

- Philip Setzer, Violinist of the Emerson String Quartet
Voices out of the Storm Photo
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Voices out of the Storm

Sunday, October 18, 2015, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Music from the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp

GIDEON KLEIN String Trio
VIKTOR ULLMAN The Lay of the Love and Death of Cornet Christoph Rilke for Piano & Speaker
HANS KRÁSA Tanec for String Trio
ZIKMUND SCHUL Chassidic Dances for Viola and Cello
PAVEL HAAS A Study for Strings

 

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About the Artist

Anna Lim, Violin; Junah Chung, Viola; Alberto Parrini, Cello; Jack Hill, Double Bass; Margaret Kampmeier, Piano; Martha Elliott, Narrator; Michael Pratt, Conductor, plus these supremely talented Princeton students:

Carolyn Chen ’16, Violin; Jessie Chen ’16, Violin; Sam Choi ’19, Violin; Samantha Cody ’17, Violin; Magdalena Collum, ‘18, Violin; Jeffrey Kuan ’18, Violin; Jackie Levine ’16, Violin; Tabitha Oh ’18, Violin; Kristin Qian ’18, Violin; Daniel Wood ’18, Violin; Ingrid Yen ’16, Violin; Tess Jacobson ’19, Viola; Nathan Wong ’18, Viola; Amy Zhang ’19, Viola; Kiwoon Baeg ‘16, Cello; Eli Chang ’16, Cello; Spencer Shen ’16, Cello; Chris Perron ‘17, Bass

Pavel Haas String Quartet Photo
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Pavel Haas String Quartet

Thursday, October 15, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MARTINU Quartet No. 3, H. 183
DVORÁK Quartet No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 34
BEETHOVEN Quartet No. 8 in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2 “Razumovsky”

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About the Artist

Veronika Jarůšková, Violin • Marek Zwiebel, Violin • Pavel Nikl, Viola • Peter Jarůšek, Cello

One of the most exciting developments in chamber music over the last ten years has been the emergence of the Czech Republic-based Pavel Haas Quartet. They have come to be known as the foremost arbiters of their homeland’s rich Romantic-era repertoire, with acclaimed recordings of the great quartets by Czech natives Dvorák, Smetana, Janácek, Martinu, and of course Pavel Haas himself. Time and again, critics have noted their nearly orchestral sound, which fills concert halls with its tremendous intensity and has already earned them Gramophone’s Record of the Year award three times in their young career. London’s The Sunday Times says, “Their account of [Dvorák’s] ‘American’ Quartet belongs alongside the greatest performances on disc”—quite extraordinary, for such a well-worn and recorded piece of music. They visit Princeton for the first time with a few gems from this repertoire, followed by Beethoven’s titan Quartet Op. 59, No. 2 “Razumovsky.”

Artist Website

Pavel Haas String Quartet »

Pavel Haas Quarett plays Smetana

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Pavel Hass Quartet plays an excerpt from Dvorak's "American" Quartet. The Sunday Times of London said this recording "belongs alongside the greatest performances on disc."

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“The world's most exciting string quartet? Well, they suit the tagline better than most. Above all, they play with passion.”

- The Times (London)
Gallicantus, Renaissance vocal ensemble Gabriel Crouch, Director Photo
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Gallicantus, Renaissance vocal ensemble Gabriel Crouch, Director

Sunday, October 11, 2015, 2:00 PM & 4:30 PM Richardson Auditorium Stage in Alexander Hall

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Program

"Songs of the Sibyl," a one-hour program presented in the round on the stage of Alexander Hall in Richardson Auditorium.

The ancient Greek prophetesses known collectively as ‘The Sibyls’ were recorded in writing from the 5th Century BC - but from the 2nd century AD, a process of judicious redaction and expansion enabled early Christians to use the Sibylline prophecies as a companion document to the Old Testament. The revised texts, though they retained some of the original mystic and apocalyptic flavor, were largely concerned with a coming Messiah, and as a result they played a significant role in some early Catholic liturgies. By the 16th Century, the 'Song of the Sibyl' was traditionally heard all over Europe on Christmas Eve, but its use was discredited by the Council of Trent (1545-1563) and the tradition now remains only in a few corners of the Iberian Peninsula. The only complete setting of the twelve Sibylline prophecies in existence was composed by Orlandus Lassus (1532-94). His Prophetiae Sibyllarum has achieved notoriety through its intense and dark chromaticism (though it was the first major work of his career, composed in around 1555, it is among his most harmonically adventurous and startling) and through the fact that, with the discredit attributed to the prophecies at precisely the time of its composition there are no other Sibylline settings to compare it with. It is, certainly in terms of its text, and arguably its harmonic language too, a quite unique work.

Our very own Gabriel Crouch (Director of Princeton's Glee Club) and his renowned Renaissance vocal ensemble Gallicantus bring these words to life in a program of the complete setting by Lassus paired with works by the celebrated “Sibyl of the Rhine” Hildegard von BIngen, alongside new works by Princeton professors Dan Trueman and Dmitri Tymoczko.

About the Artist

Literally meaning "rooster song" or "cock crow," Gallicantus takes its name from the term used in monastic antiquity for the office held just before dawn: a ceremony which evokes the renewal of life offered by the coming day. With members drawn from such renowned English vocal ensembles as Tenebrae (whom Princeton audiences heard several seasons ago), The Tallis Scholars and King's Singers, Gallicantus are as meticulous about providing context and insight for audiences as they are about crafting interpretation of the music they love. Their two sold out performance last year on our season proved this is an enesemble worth hearing.  Listen to them but a few minutes and you will find yourself believing in the higher power.  Of Music.

This informal concert will feature music introduced by the artists. Audiences are welcome to stay afterwards and talk with the artists.

Artist Website

Gallicantus »

Philippe de Monte Motets Book V: Voce mea ad Dominum clamavi

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“Everything Gallicantus touches seems to turn to gold.”

- Early Music Today
Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet Photo
Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet Photo
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Emerson String Quartet with guest artists Calidore String Quartet

Thursday, September 24, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 76, No. 4 “Sunrise”
SHOSTAKOVICH Quartet No. 10, Op. 118
MENDELSSOHN Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20

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About the Artist

Charles S. Robinson Memorial Concert

In 1976, four students at The Juilliard School discovered a shared interest in string quartet repertoire and decided to start making music together. Nearly four decades later, the Emerson Quartet has made unparalleled contributions to the genre, amassing thirty recordings, nine Grammys, and a rare induction into the Classical Music Hall of Fame. They graced our stage last season with an unforgettable program, energized by the lineup’s new addition of cellist Paul Watkins (formerly of the The Nash Ensemble of London). And now, it is a pleasure to invite them back to kick off our 2015-16 season. The evening will culminate with the youthful, exuberant, and beloved Octet in E-flat Major by Felix Mendelssohn, written just a few months after the composer’s sixteenth birthday— no better way to herald opening night! Joining the Emersons onstage for the Octet will be their current protégés, the quickly rising Calidore String Quartet, lauded as “four highly intelligent, deeply sensitive virtuosos.” (Strings Magazine) It will be an intergenerational meeting of the minds, and we can’t wait to see what will happen.

Artist Websites

Emerson String Quartet »
Calidore String Quartet »

Emerson Quartet is joined by new cellist Paul Watkins

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The Emerson String Quartet Plays the Second Movement of Ravel's String Quartet: Assez vif

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“Let’s make one thing perfectly clear: The “old” Emerson String Quartet never phoned one in. But this new group complemented their customary power, finesse and unanimity with a fresh, palpable vigor, and it was electrifying.”

- The New York Times
Anthony Roth Costanzo, Countertenor & Bryan Wagorn, Piano Photo
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Anthony Roth Costanzo, Countertenor & Bryan Wagorn, Piano

Thursday, April 30, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert discussion moderated by Professor Wendy Heller with Michael Pratt, Andrew Moravcsik and Steven Mackey at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Songs & Arias by Duparc, Britten, Liszt, Mozart, Handel, Gershwin, plus the world premiere of a work written for this occasion by Steven Mackey with special guest artists SO Percussion.

About the Artist

The delightfully funny and engaging Princeton graduate Anthony Roth Costanzo will change your idea of countertenors when he returns to his alma mater to take the stage, now “a bona-fide star,” according to The New Yorker. While the major part of his repertoire consists of works written for castrati, Costanzo prefers to evoke Frankie Valle, the Bee Gees, Michael Jackson, Mick Jagger and Prince as singers who employed their upper registers to no small advantage. Costanzo says he simply has “a more reinforced, operatic style than they did.” Rather than confine himself to the standard countertenor fare, Costanzo revels in branching out. “A recital provides a rare opportunity for me to explore my musical and artistic self,” he tells us. “Unlike opera, art songs are less often written for a specific voice type, and thus are commonly transposed to fit a particular singer’s tessitura. Duparc’s lush and ardent filigree, Liszt’s romantic and nuanced melodies— these are joys I don’t get to explore on the opera stage, but ones that have a unique resonance in the countertenor voice and to me personally. What I have learned in my opera career translates in fascinating and wonderful ways to the romantic repertoire, and even to songs by Gershwin.” Singing “I Got Rhythm,” this versatile artist might just tap dance his way into your heart.

PLUS THERE'S MORE...

MASTERCLASS WITH ANTHONY ROTH COSTANZO
Monday, May 4, 2015 at 7:00PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

Select Princeton singers work with Anthony Roth Costanzo.  Free and open to the public.

Artist Website

Anthony Roth Costanzo »

VIDEO PREVIEW: Anthony Roth Costanzo

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“a bona-fide star”

- The New Yorker
Australian Chamber Orchestra,  Richard Tognetti, Conductor with Charles Neidich, Clarinet Photo
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Australian Chamber Orchestra,  Richard Tognetti, Conductor with Charles Neidich, Clarinet

Thursday, April 16, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert event at 7pm by Ellipses Poetry Slam Team, a select group of Princeton students who are dedicated to making the spoken word a celebrated art in the Princeton community, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PROKOFIEV/BARSHAI Visions fugitives
MOZART Clarinet Concerto in A Major, K. 622
JONNY GREENWOOD Water (Princeton Premiere)
MOZART Symphony No. 40 in G Minor, K. 550

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About the Artist

Hip, refreshing and brilliant, the Australian Chamber Orchestra has been called “a badass classical band” by Time Out New York while The Washington Post hails them for combining “the energy and vibe of a rock band with the ability of a crack classical chamber group.” Their instruments alone represent an all-star lineup, including the legendary 1743 Carrodus Guarneri del Gesù violin; the Carrodus made by del Gesù, called one of the four or five of the finest violins in the world; a 1759 Guadagnini; a 1728/9 Strad; and a 1729 Giuseppe Guarneri filius Andreæ cello. But it’s the way these virtuosi play their extraordinary instruments that makes them a Dream Team. At Princeton they’ll premiere Water by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood. Following his latest international tour with legendary band Radiohead, Greenwood joined the ACO in the studio writing this new work. One of the world’s greatest guitarists, Greenwood also writes great orchestral music. He composed the award-winning film score for There Will Be Blood, was composer-in-residence with the BBC Concert Orchestra and has written scores for films The Master, Norwegian Wood and We Need to Talk About Kevin.The Orchestra will also team up with clarinetist Charles Neidich (who recently stepped in for Martin Fröst who was forced to cancel due to a shoulder injury).  In the words of The New Yorker, Charles Neidich "is an artist of uncommon merit -- a master of his instrument and, beyond that, an interpreter who keeps listeners hanging on each phrase.”  To read more about the new work by Jonny Greenwood, click here.

Artist Websites

Australian Chamber Orchestra »
Charles Neidich »

ACO Artistic Director Richard Tognetti and Radiohead Guitarist Jonny Greenwood talk about Greenwood's new piece, "Water."

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Australian Chamber Orchestra and Martin Frost play Klezmer Dances

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“a badass classical band”

- The Washington Post
Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano Photo
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Lisa Batiashvili, Violin & Paul Lewis, Piano

Thursday, March 26, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

SCHUBERT Sonata in A Major, Op. 162, D. 574 (“Grand Duo”)
SCHUBERT Rondo in B Minor, Op. 70, D. 895 (“Rondo Brilliant”)
BACH (arr: Busoni): Chorale Prelude “Nun komm' der Heiden Heiland” BWV 659 for Solo Piano
TELEMANN Fantasie No. 4 in D Major TWV 40:17 for Solo Violin
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96

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About the Artist

The mop-top musician to emerge from Liverpool most recently wasn’t born until after the breakup of those other four famous Liverpudlians. Pianist Paul Lewis didn’t take up piano until age 12 and learned about music at a local library, where he immersed himself in the recordings of the great Alfred Brendel, with whom he would later study. Ironically, it was Brendel who, after hearing Georgian-born Lisa Batiashvili perform in 2001, wrote, “Every note both sang and spoke... proving once more that great violinists reveal themselves at an early age.” Batiashvili has observed, “There is nothing more exciting than attending a live performance and feeling every moment with the artists... I am constantly striving to find new ways of expressing what’s within the music, and this helps to keep things fresh, new and exciting....” And Lewis, who is winning worldwide acclaim as an interpreter of Schubert, says, “People wonder whether there’s something valedictory about [Schubert’s] last sonata, but for me there’s almost a sense of acceptance… there’s not so much of a struggle anymore, just a sense of accepting your fate.”

Artist Websites

Lisa Batiashvili »
Paul Lewis »

Lisa Batiashvili plays Schubert

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Violinists Lisa Batiashvili plays Romance No. 1 by Clara Schumann with pianist Alice Sara Ott

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Meet The Music: Inspector Pulse Pops A String Photo
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Meet The Music: Inspector Pulse Pops A String

Saturday, March 21, 2015, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

It is only when the wacky Inspector breaks a piano string that he learns that pianos even have strings inside. Who knew that? How can we make so much music with just stretched strings? Inspector Pulse gets answers to a string of questions when he is visited by a string quartet.

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About the Artist

Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she “meets the music” in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The popular concerts for kids ages 6-12 and their families return, after a first season of two sold-out performances. Featuring musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

Artist Websites

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »
Bruce Adolphe »

Meet the Music at Richardson Auditorium on March 21, 2015 at 1pm.

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“Pierrot’s Stage,” Richardson Chamber Players Photo
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“Pierrot’s Stage,” Richardson Chamber Players

Sunday, March 1, 2015, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BIBER Battalia in D Major
SCHOENBERG Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 21

PLAYERS:

Martha Elliott, Soprano; Anna Lim, Violin; Alberto Parrini, Cello; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute; Edmund Niemann; Piano;  Wendy Young, Harpsichord; John Ferrari, Percussion; Michael Pratt, Conductor

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About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was co-founded by Nathan A. Randall and Michael J. Pratt during the 1994-1995 Centennial season of Princeton University Concerts.  The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented students.  The repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard.

Marc-André Hamelin, Piano Photo
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Marc-André Hamelin, Piano

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Ruth Ochs at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Paderewski Memorial Concert

MOZART Sonata No. 18 in D Major, K. 576
HAMELIN Pavane Variée (2014)
DEBUSSY Images, Book Two
SCHUBERT Sonata No. 21 in B-flat Major, D. 960

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About the Artist

“I am not aware of a greater marriage of intellect and sensuality,” Canadian-born Marc-André Hamelin once said of the music of Claude Debussy. Fittingly, the pianist himself has been praised in The New Yorker for “monstrously brilliant technique and his questing, deepthinking approach;” Alex Ross also called Hamelin’s hands “among the wonders of the musical world.” You might expect one of the great pianists of our time to work his way through all the time-honored piano concertos, but Hamelin seems more interested in dark horses than warhorses, and delights in discovering works by such little-known composers as Georgy Catoire, Xaver Scharwenka and Sophie Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatté. In Princeton, he will play works spanning four centuries by composers of somewhat greater renown: Mozart, Schubert, Debussy… and Hamelin (2013). Responding to the annoyance of having a cellphone interrupt a recital by pianist Hamelin, composer Hamelin of the devilish sense of humor penned the Valse Irritation d’aprés Nokia—so bring your own sense of humor along to this magnificent artist’s recital.

Artist Website

Marc-André Hamelin »

Marc-André Hamelin plays Mozart

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Marc-André Hamelin plays the 1st Movement of Haydn Piano Sonata in E MInor, HOB XVI:47

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“among the wonders of the musical world.”

- Alex Ross for "The New Yorker"
Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano Photo
Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano Photo
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Brentano String Quartet & Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-soprano

Wednesday, February 18, 2015, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

CHARPENTIER Suite in D Minor
DEBUSSY String Quartet in G Minor, Op. 10
JAKE HEGGIE Camille Claudel: Into the Fire (Princeton premiere)

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About the Artist

Fast on the heels of the enormous success of Joyce DiDonato’s first recital appearance on our series this season, and following the end of the Brentano String Quartet’s residency at Princeton, we are pleased to offer a way to hear both of these great artists again…together! This Dream Team will join forces for the Princeton premiere of Camille Claudel: Into the Fire, a song cycle for Mezzo-soprano and String Quartet written by composer Jake Heggie with lyrics by Gene Scheer Heggie. The work focuses on the tragic demise of the genius sculptor and lover of Rodin, Camille Claudel. Claudel’s career ended when she was confined to a mental hospital for the last three decades of her life. Her involuntary incarceration, which many considered unnecessary, almost doomed her to obscurity. The piece, which received its world premiere in San Francisco, was called “a heartbreaker,” by The San Francisco Chronicle, and was described as “a score of deep, squishy sentimentality and enormous beauty.” When asked what attracted him to Camille Claudel, composer Jake Heggie said, “I am consistently drawn to stories about transformative quests for identity. Claudel’s story is of a woman struggling to be known on her own, and on her own terms, for the genius that she was given. It touches on elements of feminism, on the art world, on judgments of the public versus the internal life of the artist, and on mental illness. In the end, Camille [Claudel] does triumph, because her sculptures love and dance and sing.”

Artist Websites

Brentano String Quartet »
Joyce DiDonato »

“Joyce sings and the world is suddenly brighter.”

- Composer Jake Heggie
Chicago Symphony Winds Photo
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Chicago Symphony Winds

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MOZART Serenade No. 12 for Winds in C Minor, K. 388 (“Nacht Musique”)
MOZART Serenade No. 10 for 12 Winds and String Bass in B-flat Major, K. 361 (“Gran Partita”)

PLAYERS:

Elizabeth Tiscione, Xiomara Mass, oboes
John Bruce Yeh, Teresa Reilly, clarinets
David Tuttle, Susan Warner, basset horns
Miles Maner, Drew Pattison, bassoons
Daniel Gingrich, James Smelser, Oto Carrillo, David Griffin, french horns
Daniel Armstrong, double bass

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About the Artist

Thirteen magnificent musicians—wind players of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra—are coming to play one of Mozart’s most sublime works, rarely performed at this supreme level of artistry. Here’s how Amadeus playwright Peter Shaffer depicted composer Antonio Salieri recalling his reaction the first time he heard the Gran Partita: “Suddenly… an oboe, a single note, hanging there unwavering, till a clarinet took over and sweetened it into a phrase of such delight! … This was a music I’d never heard. Filled with such longing, such unfulfillable longing, it had me trembling. It seemed to me that I was hearing a voice of God.”

OBOES, CLARINETS, HORNS, BASSOONS...WE WANT YOU!

Following the concert will be a jaw-dropping opportunity for amateur musicians of all ages and levels to join the CSO musicians on stage to sight-read Mozart Wind Serenade in E-flat Major.  We are pleased to offer another Late Night Chamber Jam! This time for wind players - specifically oboes, clarinets, horns and bassoons.  All ages and levels are welcome to participate. Tickets to the CSO Winds concert are not required to participate in the Late Night Chamber Jam, but reservations are required for the reading.  To sign up, click here.

The winds of the Berlin Philharmonic play an excerpt of the 3rd movement of Mozart's Gran Partita

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“It seemed to me that I was hearing a voice of God.”

- Amadeus" playwright Peter Shaffer depicting Antonio Salieri recalling his reaction the first time he heard the "Gran Partita
Stefan Jackiw, Violin & Anna Polonsky, Piano Photo
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Stefan Jackiw, Violin & Anna Polonsky, Piano

Thursday, February 5, 2015, 8:00 PM Musical preview featuring Opus 21, a chamber music collective of Princeton students, at 7pm, free to ticketholders

PLEASE NOTE: This concert is a substitution for the originally scheduled Isabelle Faust and Alexander Melnikov who were forced to cancel due to illness
Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Maurice Ravel Tzigane

Witold Lutoslawski Partita

Kaija Saariaho Nocturne in memory of W. Lutoslawski

César Franck Sonata in A Major

In their Washington, DC debut at the Kennedy Center just last year, the Washington Post described the performance of the Lutoslawski, which Princeton audiences will be treated to next week, as the following:  “The real heart of the evening (part of Washington Performing Arts Society’s “Virtuoso Series”) came in Witold Lutoslawski’s “Partita for Violin and Piano” from 1984, a work so explosive that the word “volcanic” barely covers it. Darkly lyrical, wildly atmospheric, it built to such white-hot intensity in the central Largo (aptly described by Jackiw as “an apocalyptic meditation”) that you thought the violin would erupt in flames. Jackiw threw himself into the music as if nothing else mattered and turned in the kind of playing you always hope for at a concert but rarely hear. It was an absolutely spectacular performance, run through with urgent and often unsettling beauty.”

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About the Artist

Jackiw is no stranger to capturing the limelight on short notice.  In recent years, he has replaced cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and violinists Lisa Batiashvili and Pam Frank, catapulting his career onto an international stage.  Hailed for “talent that’s off the scale” (Washington Post), he has appeared as soloist with the Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, New York, Philadelphia, and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras, among others, and he has collaborated with such renowned conductors as Marin Alsop, Andrew Davis, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Mikhail Pletnev, and Yuri Temirkanov. His solo performance of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra at Australia’s Sydney Opera House in March was seen live on YouTube by more than 30 million people worldwide. On disc, Jackiw is garnering acclaim for his debut album of the Brahms Violin Sonatas with pianist Max Levinson (Sony). Fanfare magazine proclaimed, “Jackiw is fantastic. …This is now the recording of Brahms’s violin sonatas to have.”   Jackiw made his European debut age 14 to great critical acclaim, playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra. His sensational performance was featured on the front page of London’s Times, and the Strad reported, “A 14-year-old violinist took the London music world by storm.” Now, at age 30, he is well on his way to joining ranks with the world’s great violinists.  In 2014 his performances were mentioned among the top ten classical music events of the year in The Boston Globe and the Chicago Sun Times.  Born in 1985 to physicist parents of Korean and German descent, Stefan Jackiw began playing the violin at the age of four. His teachers have included Zinaida Gilels, Michèle Auclair, and Donald Weilerstein. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University, as well as an Artist Diploma from the New England Conservatory. In 2002, the young artist was awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant.

Anna Polonsky, Jackiw’s regular duo partner, was heard this season on our series as a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s “Meet the Music” concert for families. She made her solo piano debut at the age of seven at the Special Central Music School in Moscow, Russia. She emigrated to the United States in 1990, and attended high school at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan. She received her Bachelor of Music diploma from The Curtis Institute of Music, where she worked with the renowned pianist Peter Serkin, and continued her studies with Jerome Lowenthal, earning her Master's Degree from The Juilliard School. In addition to performing, she serves on the piano faculty of Vassar College. She has been a member of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Two program.

Artist Websites

Stefan Jackiw »
Anna Polonsky »

“Talent that's off the scale”

- The Washington Post
“Divine Winds,” Richardson Chamber Players Photo
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“Divine Winds,” Richardson Chamber Players

Sunday, November 23, 2014, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

GIULIANI Gran Duetto Concertante for Flute and Guitar, Op. 52
MOZART Quintet for Piano and Winds in E-flat Major, K. 452
POULENC Sarabande for Solo Guitar
POULENC Sextet for Winds and Piano

PLAYERS:

Jayn Rosenfeld, Flute; Matthew Sullivan, Oboe; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Chris Komer, Horn; Robert Wagner, Bassoon; Margaret Kampmeier, Piano;  Laura Oltman, Guitar

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was co-founded by Nathan A. Randall and Michael J. Pratt during the 1994-1995 Centennial season of Princeton University Concerts.  The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented students.  The repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard.

Meet The Music: The Magical World of Maurice Ravel Photo
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Meet The Music: The Magical World of Maurice Ravel

Saturday, November 8, 2014, 1:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

At this concert, you will meet Lucas Amory, a gifted 12-year-old pianist who appears as a young pianist who is struggling to play a piece by Ravel.  In the hour-long show, he has a dream in which the composer himself appears and explains the musical mysteries of his magical-sounding music. Will the young pianist play better upon awakening? Find out what happens—and learn the secrets of Ravel’s entrancing music.  To learn more about Lucas Amory, and The Magical World of Maurice Ravel, WATCH THIS VIDEO>

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About the Artist

Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she “meets the music” in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The popular concerts for kids ages 6-12 and their families return, after a first season of two sold-out performances. Featuring musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe.

Artist Websites

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »
Bruce Adolphe »

Meet the Music at Richardson Auditorium on November 8 at 1pm.

More videos at discover and listen »

“Your youngster’s life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she “meets the music” in person at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.”

Ébène Quartet Photo
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Ébène Quartet

Thursday, November 6, 2014, 8:00 PM Musical preivew featuring the Princeton Pianists Ensemble at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in F Minor, Op. 20, No. 5, HOB III:35
SCHUMANN Quartet No. 3 in A Major, Op. 41, No. 3
plus a surprise mix of jazz standards

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About the Artist

“Someday My Prince Will Come” says the Disney song. He will indeed, on November 6, and he’s bringing three other princes with him. They are the virtuosos of the Ébène Quartet, Frenchmen known for moving seamlessly and with élan between classical and jazz (“Jazzical”?), enriching performances of each with the magic of the other. “A string quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band,” lauded The New York Times, and in praising their recent Carnegie Hall performance of a Schumann Quartet, The Times said the finale “took on a decidedly jazzy swing.” The Boston Globe hails the Quartet’s non-classical fare as “exciting and ear-opening.” With the second half of the Princeton program devoted to jazz, you might hear some Miles Davis or, in a nod to a local boy, a moving take on Bruce Springsteen’s Streets of Philadelphia, performed with instrumental majesty and surprisingly princely vocals.

Artist Website

Ébène Quartet »

Ébène Quartet plays Mendelssohn

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The Ébène Quartet plays Miserlou from Pulp Fiction

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“a quartet that can easily morph into a jazz band.”

- The New York Times
“Russian Treasures,” Richardson Chamber Players Photo
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“Russian Treasures,” Richardson Chamber Players

Sunday, October 19, 2014, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

RACHMANINOFF Piano Trio No. 1 in G Minor, "Trio Elegiac" 
RUSSIAN SONGS TBD 
MEDTNER Quintet for Piano and String in C Major, Op. Post.

PLAYERS: Anna Lim, Violin; Caitlin Wood '15, Violin; Danielle Farina, Viola; Alistair MacRae, Cello; Geoffrey Burleson, Piano; Sarah Pelletier, Soprano

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players was co-founded by Nathan A. Randall and Michael J. Pratt during the 1994-1995 Centennial season of Princeton University Concerts.  The ensemble comprises musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton University, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented students.  The repertoire largely consists of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard.

Chris Thile, Mandolin & Edgar Meyer, Bass Photo
Chris Thile, Mandolin & Edgar Meyer, Bass Photo
Chris Thile, Mandolin & Edgar Meyer, Bass Photo
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Chris Thile, Mandolin & Edgar Meyer, Bass

Thursday, October 9, 2014, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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About the Artist

At Chris Thile’s sold-out solo show last season on our series, he coined the term “stouring,” telling the audience that Richardson Auditorium was so incredible that he would rather stay put and have all of his tour audiences come to him. This year he’s back with bassist Edgar Meyer. No musician has done more to bridge the 19th century’s central European classical music tradition with the sounds of Appalachia today—think Blue Danube to Bluegrass—than composer and double bass magician Edgar Meyer. Bassist on the Grammy-winning Appalachia Waltz and The Goat Rodeo Sessions (featuring Chris Thile), he has said that pleasing himself as a bass player is “a horrendous undertaking.” Meyer has composed works for cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinists Joshua Bell and Hilary Hahn, the Emerson Quartet, and Grammy-winning mandolinist Thile, whose recent recital at Carnegie Hall (warm-up to his triumphant Princeton debut) was called “breathtaking,” “revelatory,” “poignant” and “exuberant” by The New York Times. “Edgar is one of the biggest influences on my musical life, and now I’m in a duo with him and writing songs with him,” says Thile. “This was my dream.” The enthusiasm is mutual. “I can’t think of another musician with his combination of abilities,” said Meyer. “When Chris came on the scene, it was a wonderful feeling that the next generation was going to take things well beyond what we had imagined. Mandolin and bass can be an excellent instrumentation. I like the way they interact dynamically and the way they contrast each other and don’t get in each other’s space.” You be sure to get in their space at Richardson Auditorium. These two MacArthur Geniuses will cross traditional boundaries in a diverse program of largely original music.

Artist Websites

Chris Thile »
Edgar Meyer »

Chris Thile and Edgar Meyer visit Princeton on October 9...here's a preview of what you can expect.

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Chris Thile & Edgar Meyer play This is the Pig from their first Nonesuch recording

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Emerson String Quartet Photo
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Emerson String Quartet

Thursday, October 2, 2014, 8:00 PM Pre-concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7pm, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in G Major, Op. 33, No. 5
BEETHOVEN Quartet No. 11 in F Minor, Op. 95 (“Serioso”)
RAVEL Quartet in F Major

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About the Artist

Even Dream Teams must weather the retirement of a superstar. After 35 years of incomparable artistry with David Finckel, the Emerson Quartet has drafted a “young phenom”—44-year-old superstar cellist Paul Watkins, Music Director of the English Chamber Orchestra and longtime member of The Nash Ensemble of London. In Duke University’s The Thread, Watkins said his decision to join the multi-Grammy-winning Quartet was due to “the extraordinary verve and vigor to their playing, which is incredibly infectious—you just get swept up in it. These guys are absolute masters of their instruments, with phenomenally high standards.” Just as important, however, is the “real unanimity of thought” that characterizes this superlative group. “[During ‘tryout’ rehearsals] it felt so natural to make music with these three gents that, before too long, we stopped for some champagne. At that moment, I decided that life in the Emerson Quartet was for me. They’re all romantics at heart.”

Come enjoy this brand new veteran Dream Team.

Artist Website

EMERSON STRING QUARTET »

The Emerson String Quartet Plays the Second Movement of Ravel's String Quartet: Assez vif

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“Come enjoy this brand new veteran Dream Team!”

Takács String Quartet & Meryl Streep Photo
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Takács String Quartet & Meryl Streep

Friday, September 19, 2014, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Readings from Philip Roth’s novella Everyman interspersed with works for string quartet by Arvo Pärt and Schubert

About the Artist

Reading Philip Roth’s Everyman—a story described by The New York Times as “a multi-divorced advertising man grappling with family estrangement, illness and death”—Takács Quartet violinist Ed Dusinberre was struck by its “richly musical qualities.” Dusinberre was reminded of Schubert’s compelling rumination on his own mortality, Death and the Maiden. So, in an inspired concert at Carnegie Hall, the Takács paired a performance of the Schubert and moving works for string quartet by Arvo Pärt with readings from Everyman read by the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. Mr. Roth’s casting choice for the Princeton concert is both inspired and inevitable: Meryl Streep. “Of all of our American acting marvels, she is the most profound,” he told us. “To misappropriate a line from Othello, I would walk barefoot to Palestine to watch her perform.” We asked how the Princeton concert would differ from the previous one. “Since I have lengthened the narration for this performance,” he said, “I think the audience will get a fuller sense of the book’s preoccupation with assailability: with the accumulation of physical insults, the extinguishing of vitality, and the vulnerability inherent to living. The book is the story of a marked man. All are marked. Death marks everyone. To my mind the gravest line written in English between Chaucer and Shakespeare is this one from the medieval morality play, Everyman: ‘O Death, thou comest when I had thee least in mind.’” Responding to our question about his own deep connection to music, Mr. Roth replied, “The immediacy of the pleasure of music, its existence as a wholly other reality apart from the world of words, the way it fulfills some unknown need—well, I will miss it sorely when I’m gone.” You must not miss this unique collaboration among some of the most brilliant creative and interpretive artists of our time.

PLUS THERE'S MORE...

Princeton University Concerts is once again pleased to be collaborating with the Princeton Adult School.  Over the course of two evenings this Fall - September 15 and 16 - Professor Michael Wood, the Emeritus Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton University, will explore the central themes of Philip Roth's novella Everyman.  On the second evening, Philip Roth will join the discussion via Skype, as will Edward Dusinberre, the first violinist of the Takács String Quartet.  Class participants are then invited to attend this performance on Friday, September 19.  Participants may attend the class on its own, or purchase tickets to the concert as part of the registration to the course.  Space in this class will be limited, especially to those who want to attend the concert.

RESERVATIONS FOR THE CLASS WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AUGUST 15 ON THE PRINCETON ADULT SCHOOL WEBSITE.

Artist Websites

Takács String Quartet »
Meryl Streep »

The Takács Quartet perform Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14

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The Takács Quaret plays an excerpt for Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" Quartet

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“Don't miss this unique collaboration among some of the most brilliant creative and interpretive artists of our time.”

Piotr Anderszewski, Piano Photo
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Piotr Anderszewski, Piano

Thursday, May 1, 2014, 8:00 PM Musical preview featuring the Princeton Clarinet Ensemble at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PADEREWSKI MEMORIAL CONCERT

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH  English Suite No.1, BWV 806
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH  Overture in the French style, BWV 831
LEOŠ JANÁČEK On the Overgrown Path, Book II
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN  Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major, Op.110

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About the Artist

"Not just a significant artist," said the New York Times, "Mr. Anderszewski is a colorful personality who cultivates a 'Polish punker' look with his sleek black hair and tight leather pants.  He would seem to have everything."  On another occasion it opined, "It can be hard not to wax hyperbolic when confronted with Anderszewski's sensitive touch and potent imagination."  Now, listen to this magical pianist's own tormented thoughts about the pursuit of musical perfection: "When I play with orchestra I sometimes tell myself, I'll never play a concerto again.  Too many artistic compromises; I only want to do recitals.  When I come through the extreme loneliness of the recital -- the heroism and also the cruelty involved -- I sometimes think that I'll never do recitals ever again; from now on I'll only make recordings.  When I am recording and I'm free to repeat the work as often as I wish, the possibility of doing better, of it being the best possible performance, and where everything can turn against me -- the piano, the microphone, and above all, my own sense of freedom -- I think to myself, I'll never go into a recording studio ever again; it's even more cruel.  In fact, the real, the ultimate, temptation would be to stop everything, lie down, listen to the beat of my heart, and quietly wait for it to stop." Do not miss this awe-inspiring, and inspirational, artist. 

Artist Website

Piotr Anderszewski »

Piotr Anderszewski plays Bach live in Warsaw

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Schumann Humoreske Op. 20 played by Piotr Anderszewski

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“a colorful personality who cultivates a 'Polish punker' look”

- The New York Times
Just Added! Gallicantus Photo
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Just Added! Gallicantus

Sunday, April 27, 2014, 7:30 PM Miller Chapel at Princeton Theological Seminary

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Program

“SWEET LAMENTS OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE,” music of Thomas Tallis, William Byrd, Robert Whyte, Robert Parsons and John Sheppard. At the heart of each half of this program lies a monumental setting of the Lamentations of Jeremiah, each now considered a masterpiece of its type. Here, as in the rest of the program, the music of Tallis, the 'Father' of Elizabethan music, is set against works by his most important colleagues. The names of Robert Whyte, Robert Parsons and John Sheppard are not as widely recognized as those of Byrd and Tallis today, though this is not for any lack of quality, as this program attempts to show.

For information on the first concert by Gallicantus, click here.

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About the Artist

Literally meaning "rooster song" or "cock crow," Gallicantus takes its name from the term used in monastic antiquity for the office held just before dawn: a ceremony which evokes the renewal of life offered by the coming day. With members drawn from such renowned English vocal ensembles as Tenebrae (whom Princeton audiences heard last season), The Tallis Scholars and King's Singers, Gallicantus are as meticulous about providing context and insight for audiences as they are about crafting interpretation of the music they love.  Listen to this ensemble but a few minutes and you will find yourself believing in the higher power.  Of Music.

Artist Website

www.gallicantus.com »

Philippe de Monte Motets Book V: Voce mea ad Dominum clamavi

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Gallicantus, Renaissance Vocal Ensemble, Gabriel Crouch, Director Photo
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Gallicantus, Renaissance Vocal Ensemble, Gabriel Crouch, Director

Saturday, April 26, 2014, 7:30 PM Procter Hall in The Princeton Graduate College

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Program

"The Word Unspoken," music of WILLIAM BYRD and his contemporaries

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About the Artist

Literally meaning "rooster song" or "cock crow," Gallicantus takes its name from the term used in monastic antiquity for the office held just before dawn: a ceremony which evokes the renewal of life offered by the coming day. With members drawn from such renowned English vocal ensembles as Tenebrae (whom Princeton audiences heard last season), The Tallis Scholars and King's Singers, Gallicantus are as meticulous about providing context and insight for audiences as they are about crafting interpretation of the music they love. "The Word Unspoken" reveals the real William Byrd -- devout Catholic deeply troubled by the persecution of his brethren, and composer with expressive and emotive powers beyond any of his contemporaries. His music is paired with his most prominent contemporaries, including his great teacher Thomas Tallis and Philippe de Monte, the Flemish composer whose secret gift to Byrd of a setting of Psalm 136 expressed the solidarity of an entire continent, and moved Byrd to repay de Monte with a gift of his own setting of the same psalm. Listen to this ensemble but a few minutes and you will find yourself believing in the higher power.  Of Music.

This program is available on CD on the Signum Label.

Artist Website

www.gallicantus.com »

Philippe de Monte Motets Book V: Voce mea ad Dominum clamavi

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“higher power”

Richardson Chamber Players: This England Photo
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Richardson Chamber Players: This England

Sunday, April 6, 2014, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

RALPH VAUGHN WILLIAMS Selections from "Along the Field"
ARNOLD BAX Folk Songs
BENJAMIN BRITTEN Selections from "A Birthday Hansel"
EDWARD ELGAR Quintet for Piano and Strings in A Minor, Op. 84

About the Artist

PLAYERS: Anna Lim & Stephanie Liu, Violins; Shmuel Katz, Viola; Susannah Chapman, Cello; Jennifer Tao, Piano; Elaine Christy, Harp; Rochelle Eliis, Soprano; David Kellett, Tenor

“This England”

The Nash Ensemble of London, Amelia Freedman CBE, Artistic Director Photo
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The Nash Ensemble of London, Amelia Freedman CBE, Artistic Director

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 8:00 PM Musical Preview featuring Princeton student pianists at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PROGRAM:

SMETANA Overture to The Bartered Bride
VIET CUONG  Trains of Thought (World Premiere)
SCHUMANN  Fairy Tales, Op. 132
SHOSTAKOVICH  Four Waltzes for Flute, Clarinet and Piano
DVORAK  Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81

Ian Brown, Piano
Philippa Davies, Flute
Richard Hosford, Clarinet
Stephanie Gonley, Violin
Laura Samuel, Violin
Lawrence Power, Viola
Rebecca Gilliver, Cello

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About the Artist

Adventurous programming and virtuoso performances are hallmarks of this London-based chamber collective, the resident Ensemble of London's Wigmore Hall.  They have recorded prodigiously, with nearly 90 CDs of music from Mozart to Dave Matthews, and will soon release a collection of chamber works by Czech composers incarcerated in the Theresienstadt concentration camp.  They have also, quite notably, premiered more than 270 new works, 170 of which they've commissioned!  Presented in collaboration with Princeton's Music Department, the Nash musicians will premiere a works by graduate student Viet Cuong, written expressly for them.  As a result, you will have the rare opportunity to see and hear the creative process that brings a new piece to life, while stealing a glimpse of one of the country's next great composers. 

Artist Website

nashensemble.org »

We look forward to welcoming the Nash Ensemble to Princeton, Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 8PM

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Dvorak Piano Quintet in A Majort: Movt. 3

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“Charles S. Robinson Memorial Concert”

Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano & Craig Terry, Piano Photo
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Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano & Craig Terry, Piano

Thursday, March 27, 2014, 8:00 PM pre-concert event at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Songs and arias by Fernando Obradors, Rossini, Mozart, Handel, Hasse and Reynaldo Hahn.

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About the Artist

"A commanding, royal presence" is how Vanity Fair refers to golden-voiced mezzo Joyce DiDonato, who says the characters in her recent album, "Drama Queens," run the gamut of emotions from "suicidal sadness to rapturous bliss." For Gramophone Magazine's Hall of Fame issue, composer Jake Heggie said the Kansas-born mega-star's staggering artistry "reminds us that in any generation there are few giants... She is a transformative presence...  Joyce sings and the world is suddenly brighter. Every gleaming note and phrase is infused with connection, meaning and an almost unnerving empathy."  And here is Alex Ross in The New Yorker: "There are singers who are secure in technique but cautious in expression, there are singers who deliver passion but damage the ears, and then there is Joyce DiDonato, who consistently finds the golden mean... [She] has a way of capturing extreme emotions without resorting to excess: she is a singer not only of flair and power but of intelligence and taste."  The intelligent (not to mention tasteful) thing for you to do would be to purchase tickets to her only 2014 United States recital -- right here in Princeton -- right now.
 

Artist Website

joycedidonato.com »

Joyce DiDonatao performs Rossini

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Che Peca by Reynaldo Hahn sung by Joyce DiDonato and Julius Drake, Live from Wigmore Hall

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“Joyce sings and the world is suddenly brighter.”

- Composer Jake Heggie
MEET THE MUSIC - “Leave it to Ludwig” Photo
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MEET THE MUSIC - “Leave it to Ludwig”

Saturday, March 15, 2014, 1:00 PM recommended for kids ages 6-12 and their families Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"LEAVE IT TO LUDWIG" - Beethoven's instrumental music creates powerful stories.  But what is the tale?  His music tells of everyday human life, full of action and emotions.  Beethoven himself will appear in Richardson to help a young pianist play his music as he meant it to be played.  Featuring music of Beethoven

About the Artist

Your youngster's life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she "meets the music" in person in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  Kids ages six and up embrace the joys of classical chamber music in this renowned program of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe, Director of Family Programs at CMSLC.  A 21st Century embodiment of composer/educator Leonard Bernstein and comedian/performer Victor Borge, Adolphe makes the discovery -- or rediscovery -- of chamber music a hoot for the whole family.

Artist Website

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center »

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Bruce Adolphe return to Richardson Auditorium

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“Leave it to Ludwig!”

Richard Goode, Piano & C.K. Williams, Poet Photo
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Richard Goode, Piano & C.K. Williams, Poet

Sunday, March 9, 2014, 3:00 PM pre-concert talk at 2 pm Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

A recital with poetry.

(Many people have asked which poems were read at this event, so we have listed them after the fact.  In addition to the ones listed below, Mr. Wiliiams also read "Sixty" (not yet published) and as an encore he read "All at Once" (also not yet published).  "All at Once" was paired with Janacek's
"Goodnight" from On an Overgrown Path.

"Yours"
SCHUMANN  Davidsbündlertänze, Op. 6, No. 9

"Wood" and "Back"
MOZART  Ein Kleine Gigue, K. 574

"Droplets"
SCHUMANN "Des Abends" from Fantasiestücke, Op. 12

"My Mother's Lips"  and "Swifts"
CHOPIN Scherzo from Sonata No. 3 in B Minor, Op. 58

"Realms"
BRAHMS Capriccio in C Major, Op. 76, No. 8

"Invisible Mending"
BACH Sinfonia No. 5 in E-flat Major, BWV 791

"Wait"
BACH Fugue No. 20 in A Minor BWV 889 from The Well Tempered Clavier, Book 2

"Breeze with Flowers" and "Garden"
JANÁCEK "A Blown Away Leaf" from On an Overgrown Path

"Dust"
JANÁCEK No. 4 (Presto) from In the Mists

"Beethoven Reinvents the Species Again"
BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 28 in A Major, Op. 101

Additional readings tba.  Program subject to change.

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About the Artist

On the heels of the successful Princeton University Concerts collaboration of countertenor David Daniels and choreographer Mark Morris, two more superlative artists partner in 2014: Grammy-winning pianist Richard Goode and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet C.K. Williams. The New York Times calls the poetry-loving Mr. Goode "a poet of the piano," while Paul Muldoon hails Mr. Williams, who has written of music as "this exaltation, this splendor, this bliss," as "one of the most distinguished poets of his generation."  Missing the partnership of these like-minded poets -- a Princeton exclusive -- would be tragic indeed.  

Please note that this concert was rescheduled from the 2012-2013 season and will be offered free to all subscribers who were originally holding a ticket to the concert on May 9, 2013.

______

PLUS THERE'S MORE...

RICHARD GOODE MASTERCLASS
Monday, March 10, 2014 10:00AM-12:00PM
Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

Richard Goode will work with three Princeton student pianists.  The class is free and open to the public. 

Artist Website

Richard Goode »

Richard Goode performs Bach Partita no.1 in B-flat major at Jerusalem Theater

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Richard Goode Plays Bach from Partita No. 1 in B-flat Major, BWV 825 (Praeludium)

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“this exaltation, this splendor, this bliss”

- C.K. Williams on Beethoven
Richardson Chamber Players: Quiet City Photo
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Richardson Chamber Players: Quiet City

Sunday, March 2, 2014, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ROY HARRIS Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight for Piano Trio and Soprano
SAMUEL BARBER Adagio for String Quartet
LEONARD BERNSTEIN Sonata for Clarinet for Piano
ELLIOTT CARTER Tempo e Tempi
AARON COPLAND Quiet City

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About the Artist

Players to include: Elizabeth DiFelice, Piano; Wayne DuMaine, Trumpet; Jo-Ann Sternberg, Clarinet; Alistair MacRae, Cello; Sarah Pelletier, Soprano; Mathew Sullivan, Oboe; Members of the Princeton University Orchestra, Michael Pratt, Conductor

“Quiet City”

Leonidas Kavakos, Violin & Enrico Pace, Piano Photo
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Leonidas Kavakos, Violin & Enrico Pace, Piano

Thursday, February 27, 2014, 8:00 PM pre-concert event at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN

Sonata No. 4 in A Minor, Op. 23
Sonata No. 5 in F Major, Op. 24, "Spring" 
Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96, "The Cockcrow" 

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About the Artist

One of classical music's hottest properties, Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos regularly concertizes with the world's greatest orchestras, but his recitals in this country are a precious few.  Together with pianist Enrico Pace, Kavakos will perform three of Beethoven's Violin Sonatas, including two written just before the composer penned his Heiligenstadt Testament, in which he explained that encroaching deafness was responsible for his withdrawal from society.  Here's the violinist speaking from his heart about the "Abergavenny" Stradivarius with which he has performed for the last three years.  "I'm very fortunate to have the privilege to live with an instrument like this and play on it every day and learn from its sound and be challenged by the possibilities it gives.  Many of these are museum pieces, and to be able to live with one of them -- what else can a violinist ask for in life?  The fascinating thing with an instrument... you get to know each other. But because it is great doesn't necessarily mean it's what one needs....  The chemistry is like that with another human being.  An instrument adjusts to the playing of a player and the player adjusts to the instrument. It's a give-and-take relationship." Imagine the magic these devoted partners will make together.

THERE'S MORE...

Pianist Enrico Pace will give a masterclass on Wednesday, February 26 5pm-7:30pm in Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall.  The class will be free and open to the public.

Artist Website

Leonidas Kavakos »

Leonidas Plays and Discusses the Beethoven Violin Sonatas

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Beethoven Sonata No. 1 in D Major, Op. 12, No. 1

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“astoundingly virtuosic and blazingly insightful”

- The Guardian (London)
Danish String Quartet Photo
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Danish String Quartet

Thursday, February 6, 2014, 8:00 PM musical preview featuring students from the Princeton Pianists Ensemble at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

NIELSEN String Quartet No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 14
A JOURNEY THROUGH SCANDINAVIAN FOLK MUSIC
MENDELSSOHN String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 13
 

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About the Artist

Three Danes and a Norwegian, all in their early 30s and boasting copious amounts of hair and humor, comprise the Danish String Quartet, newly chosen as members of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center's CMS Two. They joke about being modern Vikings -- "perhaps a touch more harmless than our ancestors. We're not pillaging cities or razing the English coastline!  We are simply your friendly neighborhood string quartet with above average amounts of beard." And talent. The three Danes began to play together while in their teens, and in 2008 were joined by a Norwegian cellist whom they found "hidden away in a castle outside Stockholm."  Playing string quartets is their job, and, they allow, it is hard work, "but we mostly do it for pleasure, like we always did." Whether their own or their listeners' pleasure is the greater is debatable. Their musical offering mixes Scandinavian folk music with Nielsen's Quartet No. 3, a rarely heard Scandinavian masterpiece, and Janacek's "Kreutzer Sonata," inspired by Tolstoy's tale of murderous passion.

Artist Website

danishquartet.com »

The Danish String Quartet makes its Princeton debut on February 6.

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Danish Quartet plays Nielsen Quartet No. E in E-flat Major, Op. 44: Movt. IV

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“Modern Vikings”

Behzod Abduraimov, Piano Photo
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Behzod Abduraimov, Piano

Thursday, November 21, 2013, 8:00 PM pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 12 in A-flat Major, Op. 26
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 23 in F Minor, Op. 57, "Appassionata"           
CHOPIN  Fantasia in F Minor, Op. 49
LISZT Benediction de Dieu dans la solitude, S. 173/3
SAINT-SAËNS/LISZT/HOROWITZ  Danse Macabre Op.40

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About the Artist

"Behzod Abdu-who?" quipped National Public Radio last year. "Not for long."  As rewarding as it is to bring you the world's most renowned musicians, there's special joy in introducing a little-known young artist poised to join the ranks of the all-time greats.  Behzod Abduraimov, a 23-year-old native of Uzbekistan, is such a talent.  "Rip-roaringly exciting" and "a gift from God" are among the breathless reviews he's elicited, as well as this from the International Record Review: "He has the neuro-motor responses of a jungle cat and the energy reserves of an Olympic athlete on peak form." After achieving a sensational victory in the 2009 London International Piano Competition, winning first prize with a thrilling performance of Prokofiev's Third Concerto, the young phenom toured with the Sydney Symphony under Vladimir Ashkenazy, a great pianist in his own right. Abduraimov's electrifying version of Saint-Saens's Dance Macabre is that of an artist possessed -- and sporting a rather sly grin.

Artist Website

Behzod Abduraimov »

Introducing Behzod Abduraimov

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An excerpt from Saint-Saëns Danse Macabre

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“Behzod Abdu-who?”

MEET THE MUSIC - “A Trilling Event” Photo
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MEET THE MUSIC - “A Trilling Event”

Saturday, November 16, 2013, 1:00 PM recommended for kids ages 6-12 and their families Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

"A TRILLING EVENT" - A wacky private ear, Inspector Pulse, must determine the identity of a highly ornamented tune for a desperate client.  The tune has a familiar ring, but it is so full of trills, trinkets, and decorative doodads that the Inspector must investigate all the ways a melody can be embellished in order to solve the mystery.  Featuring music of Telemann, Handel, Bach, and more

This concert is part of a new set of concerts for kids ages 6-12 and their families.

FULL PROGRAM:

BRUCE ADOLPHE, Inspector Pulse
SOOYUN KIM, Flute
NICHOLAS CANELLAKIS, Cello
ARETA ZHULLA, Violin
YING FANG, Soprano
GILLES VONSATTEL, Piano

HANDEL "Sweet Bird" for Soprano, Flute, and Continuo from L'Allegro, il Pensieroso ed it Moderato
RAMEAU Pieces de Clavecin
BACH Sonata in G Major for Viola da gamba and Keyboard, BWV 1027
TELEMANN Trio Sonata No. 3 in G Major for Flute, Violin, and Continuo, TWV 42
ROSSINI Partir o ciel, desio! from Il Viaggio a Reims
RAVEL Tzigane, rapsodie de concert for Violin and Piano

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About the Artist

Your youngster's life-long love of music will begin the moment he or she "meets the music" in person in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  Kids ages six and up embrace the joys of classical chamber music in this renowned program of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe, Director of Family Programs at CMSLC.  A 21st Century embodiment of composer/educator Leonard Bernstein and comedian/performer Victor Borge, Adolphe makes the discovery -- or rediscovery -- of chamber music a hoot for the whole family.

Artist Website

chambermusicsociety.org »

Come Meet The Music at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall on November 16, 2013 at 1pm

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“A trilling event!”

Richardson Chamber Players: Brass Bonanza Photo
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Richardson Chamber Players: Brass Bonanza

Sunday, November 10, 2013, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

GIOVANNI GABRIELI Work TBD
GEORGE GERSHWIN Transcriptions for Trumpet and Piano
OSKAR BOEHME Sextet for Brass in E-flat Minor, Op. 30
DAVID SANFORD  Forlorn Rags for Trombone and Marimba
BRAHMS Horn Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 40

About the Artist

Players:

Chris Komer, french horn
Wayne DuMaine, trumpet
Nicolas Crowell '14, trumpet
Henry Whitaker '17, trumpet
Benjamin Herrington, trombone
Brian Brown, tuba
John Ferrari, marimba
Anna Lim, violin
Francine Kay, piano

“Brass Bonanza”

St. Lawrence String Quartet Photo
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St. Lawrence String Quartet

Thursday, November 7, 2013, 8:00 PM Post-concert: Late Night Jam Session with the St. Lawrence String Quartet, open to all amateur string quartet players (see info below) Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in D Major, Op. 71, No. 2
R. MURRAY SCHAFER Quartet No. 3
DVORAK Quartet in A-flat Major, Op. 105

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About the Artist

It takes a brainy group indeed to be Ensemble-in-Residence at Stanford University, which is where the St. Lawrence String Quartet calls home. Its members are as committed to new works by such leading composers of our day as John Adams and Osvaldo Golijov as they are to the established quartet literature of Haydn and the 19th and 20th century giants who followed him.  In fact, among their honors are two Grammy Award nominations for Golijov's Yiddishbbuk.  Said Alex Ross in The New Yorker, "The St. Lawrence are remarkable not simply for the quality of their music making, exalted as it is, but for the joy they take in the act of connection." In addition to performing quartets by Haydn and Dvorak, they will perform R. Murray Schafer's String Quartet No. 3, in which they may seem more like samurai warriors than string players. A staple of the ensemble's repertoire, Schafer's quartet was described by Mr. Ross as a "spellbinding spectacle, and a hilarious send-up of the emotional infantilism of the ultramodern repertory."

CALLING ALL AMATEUR STRING QUARTET PLAYERS...THE ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET WANTS YOU!

Following the concert, we are hosting a "late night jam session" with the St. Lawrence String Quartet.  We are asking all amateurs of any age and ability to join the Quartet on stage at Richardson to read a Haydn String Quartet. The St. Lawrence Quartet has a special love for the Haydn Quartets and they have said that their "primary focus for this event is our wild enthusiasm for Haydn and how we want to convert the masses to the religion of Haydn."

To sign up, please call the Concert Office at 609-258-2800 or e-mail John Burkhalter at jburkhal@princeton.edu.  Please send your name, phone number and instrument.  The sign up deadline is November 4 and space is limited so act quickly.  The Concert Office is open Monday - Friday, 10AM -4PM.  Please leave a message if you call and get an answering machine.

Tell all of your music playing friends! The event is open to all string players - violins, violas and cellos.

Artist Website

slsq.com »

St. Lawrence String Quartet performs R. Murray Schafer's String Quartet No. 3

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Live Performance of the Canzonetta from Mendelssohn Quartet No. 1 in E-flat Major, Op. 12 played by The St. Lawrence String Quartet

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“samurai warriors”

Chris Thile, Solo Mandolin Photo
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Chris Thile, Solo Mandolin

Thursday, October 24, 2013, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Violin Sonatas and Partitas plus original compositions and other contemporary works.

About the Artist

Here's how multiple Grammy-winning mandolinist Chris Thile learned that he was a 2012 recipient of a MacArthur "Genius" Award of $500,000.  "I started getting these calls from a 312 number, which is Chicago," he told the Wall Street Journal, "and in this day and age, does anyone answer their phone when they don't know the number?... I just figured it was a robot call telling me to vote. Finally they left a message: "Tell no one about this call." I don't watch tons of TV but I've seen enough to know that that's what someone says right before you get shot!  My tour manager googled the number and it was the MacArthur Foundation.... I still kind of thought that maybe my band mates were messing with me!"  Mr. Thile transitions between genres with the greatest of ease.  A former member of the trio Nickel Creek and current member of the Bluegrass quintet Punch Brothers... collaborator with cellist Yo-Yo Ma, bassist Edgar Meyer and fiddle player Stuart Duncan on the Grammy-winning "Goat Rodeo Sessions"... and composer of music for the post-apocalyptic film "The Hunger Games," he will release an album of Bach Violin Sonatas and Partitas this summer. For more information on that release, click here.  He is, as the New York Times summed it up, "the instrument's brightest star."

This concert is funded through the American Masterpieces program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Wall Street Journal caught this footage of Chris Thile performing Bach

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Chris Thile plays solo Bach

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“the instrument's brightest star”

- The New York Times
Takács String Quartet (Part Two) Photo
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Takács String Quartet (Part Two)

Friday, October 11, 2013, 8:00 PM pre-concert talk given by Professor Scott Burnham at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders; post-concert "talk back" with members of the quartet, moderated by Professor Steven Mackey following the concert Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

All six BARTÓK String Quartets performed in two evenings.
October 10:  Quartets Nos. 1, 3 & 5
October 11:  Quartets Nos. 2, 4 & 6

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About the Artist

The Takács Quartet -- the sole string quartet in Gramophone Magazine's Hall of Fame -- will perform all six of Bartók's string quartets, which have been part of their repertoire since their origins in the 1970s.  It was Takacs' recordings in the 1990s of these seminal works that cemented their position among the world's top quartets.  What will make this event even more compelling are talks and commentary by Princeton musicologist Scott Burnham, and others.  Here is Princeton professor and composer Steven Mackey's reaction to the quartets as a teenager playing electric guitar in rock bands. "Their punchy melodies, muscular rhythms, trippy atmospheres and mind-bending continuities struck me as being the most psychedelic rock music I had ever heard.  Bartok ingested folk music and avant garde techniques in equal measure to make a music that tickled the viscera as well as the intellect. This music is at once quirky, playful, scary and sublime -- and well ahead of its time." 

This concert will be followed by a "talk back" with the quartet, moderated by Professor Steven Mackey.  This brief post-concert exchange will give audiences a chance to hear the musician's perspective on these important works.  The quartet will also take quesitons from the audience.

For anyone interested in immersing themselves in this important repertoire, consider this...
THE BARTÓK STRING QUARTETS DECONSTRUCTED - a class offered in collaboration with the Princeton Adult School.  Princeton University Concerts salutes the Princeton Adult School on its 75th anniversary by teaming up to give you a detailed look at musical repertoire that is rarely presented. Béla Bartók's six string quartets stand beside Beethoven's quartets as the core of the string quartet repertoire. Professor Derek Katz from the University of California, Santa Barbara, will demystify these important and compelling works and will prepare you to fully appreciate the works played live by the Takács Quartet on the opening nights of our season. For more information or to register for the class, visit princetonadultschool.org.

Artist Website

takacsquartet.com »

Takács Quartet Plays and Talks about Bartók

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Takacs String Quartet plays Haydn from String Quartet in C Major, Op. 74, #1, Movt. 1 (Allegro)

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“the most psychedelic rock music I had ever heard.”

- professor and composer Steven Mackey on hearing the Bartók Quartets for the first time
Takács String Quartet (Part One) Photo
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Takács String Quartet (Part One)

Thursday, October 10, 2013, 8:00 PM pre-concert talk given by Professor Scott Burnham at 7:00 PM, free to ticketholders; post-concert "talk back" with members of the quartet, moderated by Professor Steven Mackey following the concert Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

All six BARTÓK String Quartets performed in two evenings.
October 10:  Quartets Nos. 1, 3 & 5
October 11:  Quartets Nos. 2, 4 & 6

About the Artist

The Takács Quartet -- the sole string quartet in Gramophone Magazine's Hall of Fame -- will perform all six of Bartók's string quartets, which have been part of their repertoire since their origins in the 1970s.  It was Takács' recordings in the 1990s of these seminal works that cemented their position among the world's top quartets.  What will make this event even more compelling are talks and commentary by Princeton musicologist Scott Burnham, and others.  Here is Princeton professor and composer Steven Mackey's reaction to the quartets as a teenager playing electric guitar in rock bands. "Their punchy melodies, muscular rhythms, trippy atmospheres and mind-bending continuities struck me as being the most psychedelic rock music I had ever heard.  Bartok ingested folk music and avant garde techniques in equal measure to make a music that tickled the viscera as well as the intellect. This music is at once quirky, playful, scary and sublime -- and well ahead of its time."  Click here to hear what Professor Steven Mackey has to say about these important works, and here to hear Professor Scott Burnham's thoughts.

This concert will be followed by a "talk back" with the quartet, moderated by Professor Steven Mackey.  This brief post-concert exchange will give audiences a chance to hear the musician's perspective on these important works.  The quartet will also take quesitons from the audience.

For anyone interested in immersing themselves in this important repertoire, consider this...
THE BARTÓK STRING QUARTETS DECONSTRUCTED - a class offered in collaboration with the Princeton Adult School.  Princeton University Concerts salutes the Princeton Adult School on its 75th anniversary by teaming up to give you a detailed look at musical repertoire that is rarely presented. Béla Bartók's six string quartets stand beside Beethoven's quartets as the core of the string quartet repertoire. Professor Derek Katz from the University of California, Santa Barbara, will demystify these important and compelling works and will prepare you to fully appreciate the works played live by the Takács Quartet on the opening nights of our season. For more information or to register for the class, visit princetonadultschool.org.

Artist Website

www.takacsquartet.com »

Takács Quartet Plays and Talks about Bartók

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Allegretto pizzacato from Bartók 4th String Quartet

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“the most psychedelic rock music I had ever heard.”

- professor and composer Steven Mackey on hearing the Bartók Quartets for the first time
Richard Goode, Piano Photo
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Richard Goode, Piano

Thursday, May 9, 2013, 8:00 PM Please note: there is no pre-concert talk for this event Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

ALL-BEETHOVEN
Piano Sonata No. 30 in E Major, Op. 109
Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major, Op. 110
Selections from Bagatelles, Op. 119

Piano Sonata No. 32 in C Minor, Op. 111

About the Artist

"It is virtually impossible to walk away from one of Richard Goode's recitals without the sense of having gained some new insight, subtle or otherwise, into the works he played or about pianism itself," wrote Allan Kozinn in The New York Times. By now, superlative descriptions of this eminent American pianist have become commonplace anywhere he plays.  In this recital, Princeton audiences will be treated to a program featuring Beethoven's last three piano sonatas as well as six of the Bagatelles, Op. 119.  Discussing the Beethoven sonatas recently with the San Francisco Classical Voice, Mr. Goode spoke about  "the tremendous human force of Beethoven, the emotional and human meaning of his music, and that immense formal power."

PLEASE NOTE:  This event has changed. Goode was to have been joined by poet C.K. Williams for a collaborative performance, as previously announced, however Mr. Williams has had to cancel, due to illness.  The duo event has been postponed until next Spring.  Mr. Williams has said "I am disappointed to miss the event on May 9 with Richard Goode who, after many months of working together, has become a friend and a trusted colleague.  I am pleased, though, that this event can be rescheduled and look forward to appearing with him on the Princeton University Concerts series next Spring." 

Artist Website

Richard Goode »

Richard Goode performs Bach Partita no.1 in B-flat major at Jerusalem Theater

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Richard Goode Plays Bach from Partita No. 1 in B-flat Major, BWV 825 (Praeludium)

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“this exaltation, this splendor, this bliss”

Tokyo String Quartet Photo
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Tokyo String Quartet

Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

Haydn Quartet in D Minor, Op. 103, Hob. III:83 (unfinished)
Bartok Quartet No. 6, Sz. 114
Mendelssohn Quartet in E Minor, Op. 44, No. 2 

About the Artist

This FREE concert, a gift to the Princeton community, will mark one of the Tokyo Quartet’s final performances before its extraordinary 44-year history comes to an end in June 2013.  Princeton’s love affair with the quartet spans four decades and dozens of appearances.  They leave behind an amazing legacy, including close to 20 CD’s recorded in Princeton’s own Richardson Auditorium.  We are proud of our association with this exceptional ensemble and invite you to join us in bidding them a musical farewell.

Artist Website

www.tokyoquartet.com »

Tokyo Quartet plays Beethoven

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Tokyo String Quartet Plays Beethoven from Quartet Op. 130 (Presto)

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“farewell performance”

“Something Slavic” Photo
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“Something Slavic”

Sunday, April 28, 2013, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BARTÓK Romanian Folk Dances for Violin and Piano
RACHMANINOFF Vocalise for Viola and Piano
GYÖRGY KURTÁG Bach Transcriptions for Piano Four Hands
CHOPIN Polonaise Brillante for Cello and Piano
DVOŘÁK Quintet for Piano and Strings, Op. 81

Players to include Margaret Kampmeier and Edmund Niemann, pianos; Lisa Shihoten, violin; Jessica Thompson, viola; Alberto Parrini, cello

About the Artist

The Richardson Chamber Players are our resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students.  Formed in 1994-1995 more to come...

Rafal Blechacz, Piano Photo
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Rafal Blechacz, Piano

Thursday, April 25, 2013, 8:00 PM Pre-Concert Talk by Ruth Ochs at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

BACH Partita No. 3 in A Minor, BWV 827
BEETHOVEN Sonata in D Major, Op. 10, No. 3
CHOPIN Two Polonaises, Op. 40 and Scherzo No. 3 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 39
SZYMANOWSKI Sonata No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 8

About the Artist

In 2005, a young Polish pianist was the uncontested winner of the 15th Chopin International Piano Competition in Warsaw. What’s more, Rafal Blechacz took home special prizes for the best performances of mazurka, polonaise, concerto and sonata as well. That led to an exclusive recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon, which in turn led to “Best of the Year” honors from Gramophone Magazine for Mr. Blechacz’s recording of the Chopin Piano Concertos. With those bona fides, the young Pole is ideally suited to perform the varied works on this concert.

Artist Website

blechacz.net »

Pianist Rafal Blechacz plays Szymanowski and Debussy

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Rafal Blechacz Play Haydn from Sonata in E-flat Major, HOB XV1:52 (Allegro)

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“sad beauty, beaming”

Inon Barnatan, Piano Photo
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Inon Barnatan, Piano

Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 7:30 PM Pre-Concert Talk given by Professor Stanley Katz, Woodrow Wilson School and Professor Derek Katz, University of California, Santa Barbara at 6:30PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PADEREWSKI MEMORIAL CONCERT

“HONORING WOODROW WILSON”
BEETHOVEN Thirty-two Variations, C Minor
BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 21 in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”)
SCHUMANN Carnaval, Op. 9
CHOPIN Selected Pieces
SCHELLING Nocturne à Raguse
STOJOWSKI By the Brookside

About the Artist

Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan gave a memorable performance here with cellist Alisa Weilerstein in the Fall of 2011, earning an invitation to return to Princeton for a solo recital. He will do so in historic fashion with a tribute to the friendship between Woodrow Wilson, President of Princeton from 1902 to 1910 and later, of the United States, and Ignacy Paderewski, pianist, composer, and, in 1919, second Prime Minister of an independent Poland. When Wilson died in 1925, Princeton University Concerts invited Paderewski to perform a recital in honor of his late friend, colleague and political ally. Mr. Barnatan will recreate that recital to mark 100 years since Wilson entered the White House. The program includes Beethoven’s famed Waldstein Sonata and Schumann’s charming Carnaval. Mr. Barnatan was recently praised by The New Yorker for “uncommon sensitivity” in a “brilliant recital,” while the San Francisco Chronicle said he “possesses tons of technique,” and added that his West Coast audience “cheered the performance to the rafters.” Given the uniquely Princetonian nature of this concert, we predict that Richardson Auditorium will be filled to its rafters.

_________________

This concert is part of the Woodrow Wilson Centenary.  For more information on all of the events in honor of Woodrow Wilson, visit their website.

Artist Website

inonbarnatan.com »

Inon Barnatan plays Beethoven, Sonata in C major

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Inon Barnatan Plays Schubert from Sonata in B-flat, D. 960 (Allegro ma non troppo)

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“uncommon sensitivity”

Elias String Quartet Photo
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Elias String Quartet

Thursday, April 4, 2013, 8:00 PM Musical Preview at 7PM featuring Princeton students Tessa Romano, Soprano Doris Lee and Kevin Lee, Pianos is free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HAYDN Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 64, No. 6
JANÁČEK Quartet No. 2 (“Intimate Letters”)
SCHUMANN Quartet in A Minor, Op. 41, No. 1

About the Artist

It wasn’t the first time an older, married man fell in love with a younger, unattainable woman—just one of the more artistically fruitful ones. In his 60s, Leoš Janáček met Kamila Stösslová, 38 years his junior, whose image he would call “translucent as mist.” Over the next decade plus, he wrote hundreds of intimate letters to her, kept a “Kamila” diary, and modeled operatic heroines after her. His Second String Quartet, “Intimate Letters,” is filled with “that sweetest longing” for Kamila. Her family joined Janáček in his native village in July, 1928; we can picture the composer pleased when Kamila’s husband departed. Then fate intervened. Kamila’s son got lost, and while looking for the little boy, Janáček literally caught his death of cold, expiring in August. The intensely talented Elias Quartet, newly recorded in a live concert at Wigmore Hall, will perform this powerful music along with quartets by Schumann and Haydn, the father of the form.

Artist Website

www.eliasstringquartet.com »

The Elias Quartet makes its Princeton debut on Thursday, April 4 at 8PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.

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Elias String Quartet Plays Schubert from Quartettsatz

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“Translucent as mist”

Artemis String Quartet Photo
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Artemis String Quartet

Thursday, March 14, 2013, 8:00 PM Musical Preview at 7PM featuring Princeton University pianists Mariana Olaizola '13 and Darya Koltunyuk '15, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MENDELSSOHN String Quartet in D Major, Op. 44, No. 1
BACH Selections from The Art of the Fugue
ASTOR PIAZZOLLA Fugues
MENDELSSOHN String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 80

About the Artist

Mendelssohn’s exuberant String Quartet in D Major, the first movement of which calls to mind his famous Octet, was written less than a year into his marriage and following the birth of his first child in 1838. Nine years later, after his beloved sister Fanny died, he wrote, “With her kindness and love she was part of myself every moment of my life… I will never, never be able to get used to it. Perhaps she is lucky, in her marvelously harmonious existence, not to have experienced the pain of old age, of life gradually ebbing….” His anguished Quartet in F Minor was a memorial to Fanny. Within six months of her passing, Mendelssohn, too, escaped the pain of old age, dead at 38. These very disparate works, along with music of Bach and Piazzolla, will be in the sensitive hands of the Berlin-based Artemis String Quartet, one of the leading ensembles of their generation.

____________________________________________________

Members of the Artemis Quartet will coach Princeton students in a masterclass open to the public on Friday, March 15, 2013  - 10:30AM-12:30PM in Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall.

Artist Website

www.artemisquartet.com »

The Artemis Quartet appears at Princeton on Thursday, March 14 at 8PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Artemis Quartet plays Beethoven from Op. 59, No. 3 (Menuetto)

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“Marvelously harmonious existence”

The English Concert - Harry Bicket, Director Photo
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The English Concert - Harry Bicket, Director

Thursday, February 21, 2013, 8:00 PM Pre-Concert Talk by Professor Steven Zohn at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HARRY BICKET, Director/Harpsichord
Nadja Zwiener,  Violin
Alfonso Leal del Ojo, Viola

PURCELL Suite from King Arthur, Z 628
HANDEL Concerto Grosso Op. 3 No. 2 in B-flat Major, HWV 313
TELEMANN Concerto for Viola in G Major, TWV 51:G9
BACH Concerto for Violin No. 1 in A Minor, BWV 1041
HANDEL Watermusic Suite (selections from Suites No 1, 2 and 3)  

About the Artist

When the Father of our country was born in 1732, Henry Purcell, alas, was long dead—but Georg Philipp Telemann was writing music in Hamburg, and George Frideric Handel was composing in London. The music of these three composers will be performed here by one of the world’s finest chamber orchestras, the English Concert. The ensemble is acclaimed for its Handel interpretations, and its appearance on our series anchors the biennial American Handel Festival in Princeton in 2013. In the 1970s, this chamber orchestra, according to London’s Daily Telegraph, blazed the trail of “historically informed” performances of Handel and his baroque brethren. “Audiences were amazed to hear this music played on instruments appropriate to the period, and with a dancing kind of expressivity rather than a heavy, romantic one,” said the newspaper, a revolutionary approach that George Washington surely would have related to.

Artist Website

www.englishconcert.co.uk »

The English Concert performs with singer, Alice Coote, at the Library of Congress

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The English Concert plays Handel from Il caro Sassone, Delirie Amoroso, HWV 99

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“dancing expressivity”

“Bachianas & More” Photo
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“Bachianas & More”

Sunday, February 17, 2013, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

VILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 for Flute and Bassoon
KURT WEILL Frauentanz, 7 Poems from the Middle Ages, Op. 10 for Soprano and Instruments
HINDEMITH Die junge Magd, Song cycle for Mezzo-soprano, Flute, Clarinet, and String Quartet
VILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 for Soprano and an Orchestra of Cellos

Players to include Jayn Rosenfeld, flute; Jeff Hodes '12, clarinet; Bob Wagner, bassoon; Chris Komer, horn; Ruotao Mao, violin; Dean Wang '13, violin; Danielle Farina, viola; Bradley Berman '16, cello; Sean Chen '14, cello; Andrew Day '13, cello; Nathan Haley '14, cello; Greta Hayes '14, cello; Sohee Khim '14, cello; Alberto Parrini, cello; Elliot Pearl-Sacks '15, cello; Martha Elliott, soprano; Barbara Rearick, mezzo-soprano; Michael Pratt, conductor

Read more about the program »
East Coast Chamber Orchestra & You Photo
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East Coast Chamber Orchestra & You

Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

MOZART Divertimento in F Major, K. 138
TCHAIKOVSKY  Serenade for Strings in C Major
GEMINIANI/WIANKO  Variations on "La Follia" for String Orchestra
plus… a community reading of BENJAMIN BRITTEN'S Simple Symphony with ECCO—all amateur string players invited!

To sign up call us at 609-258-2800 or e-mail John Burkhalter with your name, phone number and instrument.

DEADLINE TO SIGN-UP FOR THE COMMUNITY READING IS FEBRUAY 1, 2013.

Click on program information link below to download a PDF with details about the Community Reading.

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

​Imagine hearing two dozen of the very best young string players in the country play music they love with all the passion and fire at their command. Now imagine that, as a bonus, they ask you to play with them! It would be like winning the lottery, minus the taxes. That’s precisely what ECCO is, and what they’ll do in Princeton. The East Coast Chamber Orchestra comprises members of the world-renowned orchestras of Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco, along with leading young chamber musicians and Time For Three’s Nick Kendall. What this democratic ensemble does not have is a conductor. Their concert will include a delightful Divertimento by Mozart and a Tchaikovsky's lush Serenade for Strings. In between those two works, every string player with an instrument in tow will be invited to perform with ECCO! Even if you’re not concertizing yourself, the experience is guaranteed to reverberate for a very long time.

For more videos, check out ECCO’s YouTube channel.

Artist Website

www.eastcoastchamberorchestra.com »

Preview of the East Coast Chamber Orchestra in action

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East Coast Chamber Orchestra plays Tchaikovsky from Serenade for Strings in C Major

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“like winning the lottery, minus the taxes”

Angelika Kirchschlager, Mezzo-soprano  & Ian Bostridge, Tenor & Julius Drake, Piano Photo
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Angelika Kirchschlager, Mezzo-soprano & Ian Bostridge, Tenor & Julius Drake, Piano

Thursday, February 7, 2013, 8:00 PM Pre-Concert Talk by Professor Susan Youens at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

HUGO WOLF Selections from Spanisches Liederbuch

About the Artist

Religious fervor and sexual ecstasy are almost indistinguishable in these songs.”  Now that we have your attention, here’s what else Britain’s Opera Today said of this duo’s performance of Hugo Wolf’s treatment of 16th- and 17th-century Spanish poems: “Ian Bostridge and Angelika Kirchschlager revealed the profound emotional intensity of Wolf’s art; the concentrated ardour of their performance intimated the heightened passion and expressive angst which, as well as driving Wolf’s creative spirit, also led to persistent depression and resulted in insanity and finally death in a mental asylum at the age of 42.”

Mr. Bostridge ranks Wolf with Schubert and Schumann as the best of the 19th-century’s song composers. He and Ms. Kirchschlager will only perform these alluring songs at two other venues—Lincoln Center and the Kimmel Center—which puts Princeton University at the center of the lieder universe in 2013.

Artist Websites

Ian Bostridge »
Angelika Kirchschlager »

Ian Bostridge and conductor, Antonio Pappano, collaborate for the first time

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Tenor Ian Bostridge Sings Hugo Wolf from Morike Lieder: Gebet

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“Religious fervor and sexual ecstasy”

Christian Tetzlaff, Violin Photo
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Christian Tetzlaff, Violin

Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 7:30 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

PLEASE NOTE:  THIS CONCERT IS A REPLACEMENT FOR JULIA FISCHER WHO HAS CANCELLED DUE TO FAMILY REASONS.  TICKET HOLDERS WITH QUESTIONS SHOULD CALL THE CONCERT OFFICE AT 609-258-2800.

YSAŸE Violin Sonata, Op. 27, No. 1
BACH Violin Sonata for Violin Solo No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1005
GYÖRGY KURTÁG from "Signs, Games and Messages"
BÉLA BARTÓK Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin

Read more about the program »

About the Artist

"Since the time of Paganini, violin virtuosos have tried to overwhelm audiences with feats of agility.  Tetzlaff is after something different," according to The New Yorker, who profiled Tetzlaff this past August 2012.  "A character actor in a field of matinée idols, he prefers to disappear into the sound world he creates onstage.  "You become the thing," Tetzlaff says.  "Or that's the hope."

Again, according to the The New Yorker, "Tetzlaff is distinguished by his deep musical empathy--his ability to open a window onto a composer's inner life."  He has been doing this for over 20 years, these days playing more than a hundred concerts a year.  One focus of the 2012/13 season consists of 10 concerts in London: at the Proms, with the London Philharmonic and Osmo Vänskä, London Symphony with Daniel Harding as well as a residency at the Wigmore Hall. Christian Tetzlaff is also Artist-in-Residence with the Tonhalle Orchestra Zürich where he opened the season in August 2012 with Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto under David Zinman. He will also be present there under Christoph von Dohnanyi, with a chamber music project, a duo recital with Leif Ove Andsnes and with his string quartet.

In addition, Christin Tetzlaff makes return visits to orchestras such as the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, BR Symphony Orchestra Munich, Berlin Philharmonic, Gewandhaus orchestra Leipzig, New York Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony, Montreal Symphony, and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. At the end of the season he will appear with the Berlin Philharmonic in their famed open-air arena "Waldbühne" under Simon Rattle.

In recital Christian Tetzlaff appears in several major cities with pianist Leif Ove Andsnes. In spring 2013 he embarks on an extensive tour with his string quartet with concerts in Oslo, Cologne, London, Zürich, Freiburg, Berlin and Paris. At the Konzerthaus Vienna and the Wigmore Hall London he can be heard in a program of solo Bach.

Tetzlaff's discography for Virgin Classics and other labels includes the major concerto repertoire, Bartok Sonatas with Leif Ove Andsnes, and the three Brahms Violin Sonatas with Lars Vogt. Christian Tetzlaff has received several awards for his recordings: the Diapason d'Or twice, the Edison prize, the Midem Classical Award as well as the ECHO Klassik prize and several nominations for the Grammy.

Artist Website

christiantetzlaff.com »

Christian Tetzlaff plays Solo Bach

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Christian Tetzlaff plays Bach

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“explosive virtuosity”

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Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips, Director

Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 8:00 PM
“Music for a While” Photo
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“Music for a While”

Sunday, November 11, 2012, 3:00 PM Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Program

All-Purcell, instrumental and vocal works, including selections from The Fairy Queen and The Mock Marriage played on original instruments

Laura Heimes, soprano; Nancy Wilson and Vita Wallace, baroque violins; David Miller, baroque viola; Vivian Barton Dozor, baroque cello and gamba; Wendy Young, harpsichord

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Tenebrae - Nigel Short, Director

Thursday, November 8, 2012, 8:00 PM Presented in collaboration with McCarter Theatre Princeton University Chapel

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Program

Presented in collaboration with McCarter Theatre

RACHMANINOV  Priidite, poklonimsya (All-Night Vigil)
RACHMANINOV Great Litany (Liturgy of St John Chrysostom)
RACHMANINOV The Cherubic Hymn
RACHMANINOV Blazhen muzh (All-Night Vigil)
CHESNOKOV  Izhe Heruvimi
KALINNIKOV I will love thee
PAUL MEALOR Now sleeps the crimson petal
PAUL MEALOR Salvator mundi
RACHMANINOV Bogoritse Devo
ARVO PART The Beatitudes
PAUL MEALOR  Locus iste
PAUL MEALOR Ubi caritas
CHESNOKOV Svete tihi
RACHMANINOV  Nÿne otpushchayeshi
TCHAIKOVSKY Legend (The Crown of Roses)
KEDROV  Otche nash
RACHMANINOV Vzbrannoy voyevode (All-Night Vigil)

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About the Artist

“Song shows us a world that is worthy of our yearning, it shows us our selves as they might be if we were worthy of the world.”    — Salman Rushdie, from The Ground Beneath Her Feet

Few things can move us as deeply as the human voice in song—in exaltation, in ecstasy, in memorial. In just over a decade, Britain’s 17-voice Tenebrae has combined passion and precision to become one of the premier chamber choirs in the world. This year they won a BBC Music Magazine Award after being the first artists nominated twice in one category. Their concert will reveal treasures of the Russian repertoire as well as works by Paul Mealor, the British choral composer who’s been wildly popular since his music was performed at the recent Royal Wedding. The evening will be downright Princetonian as well, since one of Tenebrae’s principal singers, Gabriel Crouch, directs Princeton’s Glee Club and Choral Program. And Tenebrae are known for exploiting the unique qualities of the space in which they’re performing, which in this case will be the gothic splendor of the Princeton University Chapel.

Artist Website

www.tenebrae-choir.com »

Meet Tenebrae: Britain's Premier Chamber Choir

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Tenebrae Sings Paul Mealor from Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal (Four Madrigals on Rose Texts)

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“worthy of our yearning”

Takács String Quartet Photo
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Takács String Quartet

Thursday, October 4, 2012, 8:00 PM Pre-Concert Talk by Professor Scott Burnham at 7PM, free to ticketholders Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Ticket Info

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Program

SCHUBERT String Quartet No. 13 in A Minor, D. 804 (“Rosamunde”)
BRITTEN String Quartet No. 2 in C Major
DVOŘÁK String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American”)

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About the Artist

​The Takács has entered the pantheon of the world’s great string quartets, as evidenced by their hugely engaging performances and unique blend of drama, warmth and humor, as well as their recent appointment as Associate Artists of London’s prestigious Wigmore Hall. Takács “established itself as one of the world’s eminent string ensembles soon after its founding in 1975,” according to The New York Times, which termed their recent Carnegie Hall performance “utterly gripping.” Their program begins with one of Schubert’s last quartets and, marking the centenary of his birth, one by Britten, who in 1945 called it “the greatest advance that I have yet made.” The evening concludes with Dvořák’s “American” Quartet, which, during a visit to the Czech community in Spillville, Iowa, spilled out of the composer in a matter of days.

Artist Website

www.takacsquartet.com »

The Takács Quartet perform Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14

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Takacs String Quartet plays Haydn from String Quartet in C Major, Op. 74, #1, Movt. 1 (Allegro)

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“utterly gripping.”

- The New York Times
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